FAMU-FSU College of Engineering
Computer
Architecture
EEL 4713/5764, Spring 2006
Dr. Michael Frank
Module #1 - Introductory Lecture
Introductory Lecture

Overview of Computer Architecture


What’s it all about?
Course Administrative Matters

Overview of Syllabus, Course Objectives



Grading Policies & Procedures
First Homework out – Due next Wed.
(Time Permitting) Begin Chapter 1

Review of Combinational Logic
What’s Computer Architecture?

Architecture (in general) =


Design of a functional structure
Computer Architecture (CA) =

Design of the logical structure and
functional organization of a computer system.


Especially its CPU and associated components
Computer Architecture does not traditionally include
other aspects of computer system design…

Enclosures, styling, packaging, applications, power
supplies, cooling systems, peripheral devices…

But these are all important in designing real-world products!
What is a Computer?

Not Just
This!
A computer is (most generally) any
information processing system!

Today, this almost always
means a digital system…


Though simple analog “computers” do exist…
Medieval
astrolabe
Also, today we usually mean a general-purpose,
universal, or at least programmable computer

Although a wide range of non-programmable digital
components exist that perform fixed functions

These could be considered simple special-purpose computers
Types of Computers


In this course, a “computer”
could be anything from the
simplest embedded
microprocessor…
…to the largest
supercomputer!

We will discuss architectural
techniques for parallel
computing if time permits…
Intel 4004 (1971)
(4-bit, 740 kHz)
IBM Blue Gene/L (2005)
(65,536 processors,
136 TFlops, 1MW, 300 tons)
Levels of Computer Architecture

Computer architects may deal with design
elements at a variety of different levels…



Custom logic circuit & functional-unit designs.
CPU datapath pipelines, memory hierarchies.
Instruction-Set Architectures (ISAs)



Or other programming models.
Special compiler & operating system support.
Multiprocessing systems, interconnection
networks, distributed systems...
Levels of Design & Abstractions
Useful Real-World Products
Hardware
description
languages
Computer
Architecture
HW/SW
interface
}
Processor example:
Intel Itanium 2
(McKinley) 64b Processor
• 221 million transistors!
(~US adult population)
• How are they used?
• What will we do as
transistor counts grow?
Most of chip is used for
memories, inst. decoding,
dynamic scheduling…
• Why is it done this way?
• How much more efficient
could it be if more of area
went to actual processing?
Dual-Core CPUs
Intel “Smithfield” Pentium D die photo
Course Administrative Matters

Go over syllabus:


Go over course website:


Objectives, Outcomes, Grading Policies
Slides, Assignments, Submission Procedures
First homework available right after class!


Covers Ch. 1: Review of combinational logic.
Due next Wednesday, BEFORE CLASS
Course Instructional Objectives (CIOs)
CIO #
Mnemonic
Description
Relevant book
Chapters
1.
Metrics
Calculate and interpret different performance and cost metrics of
computer systems.
Parhami ch. 4,
P&H ch. 4
2.
AsmML
Derive machine code from assembly instructions.
Parhami ch. 5,
P&H ch. 2 + app. A
3.
CAsm
Derive assembler code from an equivalent C code representation.
Parhami chs. 6-7,
P&H ch. 2 + app. A
4.
FP-rep
Calculate and interpret IEEE standard binary floating-point number
representations.
Parhami chs. 9+12,
P&H sec. 3.6
5.
Ctl/DF
Analyze the control and data flow within a single-cycle CPU and/or
arithmetic logic unit when executing specific instructions.
Parhami ch. 13,
P&H secs. 5.1-5.4
6.
Mult/Div
Design and implement multiplication and division algorithms.
Parhami ch. 11,
P&H secs. 3.4-3.5
7.
McycDP
Analyze a multicycle datapath of a microprocessor.
Parhami ch. 14,
P&H sec. 5.6
8.
Cache
Analyze and compare different cache architectures, and/or identify
the most suitable cache design for a given need.
Parhami ch. 18,
P&H ch. 7
9.
Contemp
Explain or analyze contemporary issues in computer architecture.
Parhami part 7,
P&H ch. 9, etc.
10.
LLL
Recognize the need for and engage in life-long learning.
N/A
Program Outcomes (POs) and
The Course CIO-PO Matrix
 Program
Outcomes: Students graduating from the
BSEE and BSCpE programs will have:
(a) Apply: An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics,
science, and engineering;
 (c) Design: An ability to design a system, component, or
process to meet desired needs;
 (e) Solve: An ability to identify, formulate, and solve
engineering problems;
 (i) LLL: A recognition of the need for, and an ability to
engage in life-long learning;
 (j) Contemp.: A knowledge of contemporary issues;
 (o) Topics: (EE) A knowledge of electrical engineering
applications selected from the …digital systems… areas.
(CpE) A knowledge of computer science and computer
engineering topics including … computer architecture.
ECE Program
Outcomes

 Each
outcome is assessed through…
3 = an examination or quiz problem requiring individual
effort by the student.
 2 = a HW assignment, project assignment or laboratory
experiment requiring group effort.

CIO #
a c e
i
3
j o
1. Metrics
3
3
2. AsmML
3
3
3. CAsm
3 3
3
4. FP-rep
3
3
3
5. Ctl/DF
3
3
3
6. Mult/Div
3 2
7. McycDP
3
3
3
8. Cache
3 3 3
3
9. Contemp.
2
10. LLL
2
3
2 2
2
Grading Scale & Weightings

Scale: A ≥ 90%, B ≥ 80%, C ≥ 70%, D ≥ 60%


Rigid; no curves, exceptions, or rounding!
The overall course grade is determined as the
weighted average of the following items:
Grading Category
Undergrads
Grads
Attendance and participation
5%
5%
Homework assignments and small projects
10%
10%
Short papers (U) or research project (G)
5%
15%
Midterm Exam #1
25%
20%
Midterm Exam #2
25%
20%
Final Exam
30%
30%
Your Assignment for Today is…






Sign the attendance sheet before you leave.
Sign and turn in a prerequisite form before
you leave.
Get the textbook from the bookstore ASAP.
Get on the course’s Blackboard site ASAP.
Download homework #1.
Do it by next Tuesday!
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Computer Architecture - FAMU