Database Design: Logical Model
Design & Access DB Creation
University of California, Berkeley
School of Information Management
and Systems
SIMS 257: Database Management
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 1
Lecture Outline
• Review
– Database Design, Conceptual Model
– Object-Oriented Modeling
• Logical Design for the Diveshop
database
• Access Database Creation
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 2
Lecture Outline
• Review
– Database Design, Conceptual Model
– Object-Oriented Modeling
• Logical Design for the Diveshop
database
• Access Database Creation
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 3
Database Design Process
Application 1
External
Model
Application 2
Application 3
Application 4
External
Model
External
Model
External
Model
Application 1
Conceptual
requirements
Application 2
Conceptual
requirements
Application 3
Conceptual
requirements
Conceptual
Model
Logical
Model
Internal
Model
Application 4
Conceptual
requirements
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 4
Object-Oriented Modeling
• Becoming increasingly important as
– Object-Oriented and Object-Relational DBMS
continue to proliferate
– Databases become more complex and have
more complex relationships than are easily
captured in ER or EER diagrams
• (Most UML examples based on McFadden, “Modern
Database Management”, 5th edition)
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 5
DiveShop ER Diagram
Customer
No
DiveCust
1
Destination
Name
Destination
no
Customer
No
ShipVia
n
Dest
n
1
DiveOrds
n
1
ShipVia
ShipVia
1
Destination
no
Site No
1
n
Site No
BioSite
Species
No
1
Destination
n
Sites
Order
No
n
1
1/n
ShipWrck
Order
No
DiveItem
n
Item
No
n
Site No
1
Species
No
BioLife
IS 257 – Fall 2004
1
DiveStok
Item
No
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 6
Entities
•
•
•
•
•
Customer
Dive Order
Line item
Shipping information
Dive Equipment
Stock/Inventory
• Dive Locations
IS 257 – Fall 2004
• Dive Sites
• Sea Life
• Shipwrecks
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 7
What must be calculated?
• Total price for equipment rental?
• Total price for equipment sale?
• Total price of an order?
– Vacation price
– Equipment (rental or sale)
– Shipping
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 8
What is Missing??
• Not really an “enterprise-wide” database
– No personnel
•
•
•
•
Sales people
Dive masters
Boat captains and crew
payroll
– Local arrangements
• Dive Boats
• Hotels
– Suppliers/Wholesalers for dive equipment
• Orders for new/replacement equipment
– No history (only current or last order)
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 9
Object-Oriented Modeling
• Becoming increasingly important as
– Object-Oriented and Object-Relational DBMS
continue to proliferate
– Databases become more complex and have
more complex relationships than are easily
captured in ER or EER diagrams
• (Most UML examples based on McFadden, “Modern
Database Management”, 5th edition)
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 10
Object Benefits
• Encapsulate both data and behavior
• Object-oriented modeling methods can be
used for both database design and
process design
– Real-World applications have more than just
the data in the database they also involve the
processes, calculations, etc performed on that
data to get real tasks done
– OOM can be used for more challenging and
complex problems
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 11
Unified Modeling Language (UML)
• Combined three competing methods
• Can be used for graphically depicting
– Software designs and interaction
– Database
– Processes
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 12
CLASS
• A class is a named description of a set of objects
that share the same attributes, operations,
relationships, and semantics.
– An object is an instance of a class that encapsulates
state and behavior.
• These objects can represent real-world things or conceptual
things.
– An attribute is a named property of a class that
describes a range of values that instances of that
class might hold.
– An operation is a named specification of a service
that can be requested from any of a class's objects to
affect behavior in some way or to return a value
without affecting behavior
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 13
UML Relationships
• An relationship is a connection between or
among model elements.
• The UML defines four basic kinds of
relationships:
– Association
– Dependency
– Generalization
– Realization
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 14
UML Diagrams
• The UML defines nine types of diagrams:
– activity diagram
– class diagram
• Describes the data and some behavioral
(operations) of a system
– collaboration diagram
– component diagram
– deployment diagram
– object diagram
– sequence diagram
– statechart diagram
– use case diagram
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 15
Class Diagrams
• A class diagram is a diagram that shows a
set of classes, interfaces, and/or
collaborations and the relationships
among these elements.
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 16
UML Class Diagram
DIVEORDS
Order No
Customer No
Sale Date
Shipvia
PaymentMethod
CCNumber
No of People
Depart Date
Return Date
Destination
Vacation Cost
CalcTotalInvoice()
CalcEquipment()
IS 257 – Fall 2004
Class Name
List of Attributes
List of operations
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 17
Object Diagrams
307:DIVORDS
Order No = 307
Customer No = 1480
Sale Date = 9/1/99
Ship Via = UPS
PaymentMethod = Visa
CCNumber = 12345 678 90
CCExpDate = 1/1/01
No of People = 2
Depart Date = 11/8/00
Return Date = 11/15/00
Destination = Fiji
Vacation Cost = 10000
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 18
Differences from Entities in ER
• Entities can be represented by Class
diagrams
• But Classes of objects also have
additional operations associated with them
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 19
Operations
• Three basic types for database
– Constructor
– Query
– Update
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 20
Associations
• An association is a relationship that
describes a set of links between or
among objects.
• An association can have a name that
describes the nature of this relationship.
You can put a triangle next to this name
to indicate the direction in which the
name should be read.
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 21
Associations
• An association contains an ordered list of
association ends.
– An association with exactly two association
ends is called a binary association
– An association with more than two ends is
called an n-ary association.
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 22
Associations: Unary relationships
*
0..1
Person
0..1
IS 257 – Fall 2004
Is-married-to
manages
Employee
0..1 manager
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 23
Associations: Binary Relationship
Employee
0..1
Is-assigned
Parking
Place
0..1
One-to-one
Product
Line
1
contains
*
Product
One-to-many
Student
*
Registers-for
*
Course
Many-to-many
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 24
Associations: Ternary Relationships
Part
*
Vendor
IS 257 – Fall 2004
*
Supplies
* Warehouse
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 25
Association Classes
Registers-for
Student
*
Course
*
Computer Account
Registration
_________________
________________
acctID
Term
issues
Password
*
0..1
Grade
ServerSpace
________________
CheckEligibility()
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 26
Derived Attributes, Associations, and
Roles
Course
Student
Course
Offering
_________
____________
____________ Scheduled-for
name
Registers-for
crseCode
term
ssn
*
crseTitle
*
*
1
section
dateOfBirth
creditHrs
time
Derived
/age
location
attribute
*
*
/participant Derived role
{age = currentDate – dateOfBirth}
/Takes
Derived association
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 27
Generalization
Employee
____________
empName
empNumber
address
dateHired
____________
printLabel()
Hourly Employee
_______________
HourlyRate
_______________
computeWages()
IS 257 – Fall 2004
Salaried Employee
_______________
Annual Sal
stockoption
_______________
Contributepension()
Consultant
_______________
contractNumber
billingRate
_______________
computeFees()
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 28
Other Diagramming methods
• SOM (Semantic Object Model)
• Object Definition Language (ODL)
– Not really diagramming
• Access relationships display
• Hybrids
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 29
Application of SOM to Diveshop
DIVECUST
Name
Address
Street
City
StateProvince
ZIPPostalCode
Country
Phone
FirstContact
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
1.1
DIVEORDS
IS 257 – Fall 2004
1.N
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 30
DIVEORDS
DIVEORDS
OrderNo
SaleDate
DIVECUST
id
SHIPVIA
DESTINATION
DIVEITEM
PaymentMethod
CCNumber
CCExpDate
NoOfPeople
DepartDate
ReturnDate
VacationCost
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 31
Lecture Outline
• Review
– Database Design, Conceptual Model
– Object-Oriented Modeling
• Logical Design for the Diveshop
database
• Access Database Creation
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 32
Database Design Process
Application 1
External
Model
Application 2
Application 3
Application 4
External
Model
External
Model
External
Model
Application 1
Conceptual
requirements
Application 2
Conceptual
requirements
Application 3
Conceptual
requirements
Conceptual
Model
Logical
Model
Internal
Model
Application 4
Conceptual
requirements
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 33
DiveShop ER Diagram
Customer
No
DiveCust
1
Destination
Name
Destination
no
Customer
No
ShipVia
n
Dest
n
1
DiveOrds
n
1
ShipVia
ShipVia
1
Destination
no
Site No
1
n
Site No
BioSite
Species
No
1
Destination
n
Sites
Order
No
n
1
1/n
ShipWrck
Order
No
DiveItem
n
Item
No
n
Site No
1
Species
No
BioLife
IS 257 – Fall 2004
1
DiveStok
Item
No
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 34
Logical Design: Mapping to a Relational
Model
• Each entity in the ER Diagram becomes a
relation.
• A properly normalized ER diagram will indicate
where intersection relations for many-to-many
mappings are needed.
• Relationships are indicated by common columns
(or domains) in tables that are related.
• We will examine the tables for the Diveshop
derived from the ER diagram
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 35
Customer = DIVECUST
Customer No
Name
Street
City
State/Prov Zip/Postal Code
Country
1480 Louis Jazdzewski
2501 O'Connor
New Orleans
LA
60332
U.S.A.
1481 Barbara Wright
6344 W. Freeway
San Francisco
CA
95031
U.S.A.
1909 Stephen Bredenburg
559 N.E. 167
Indianapolis
Place IN
46241
U.S.A.
1913 Phillip Davoust
123 First Street
Berkeley CA
94704
U.S.A.
1969 David Burgett
320 Montgomery
SeattleStreet
WA
98105
U.S.A.
2001 Mary Rioux1701 Gateway
Pueblo
Blvd. #385
CO
81002
U.S.A.
2306 Kim Lopez 14134 Nottingham
HonoluluLane
HI
96826
U.S.A.
2589 Hiram Marley
7233 Mill Run
SanDrive
Francisco
CA
94123
U.S.A.
3154 Tanya Kulesa
505 S. Flower,
NewMail
YorkStop
NY 48943 10032
U.S.A.
3333 Charles Sekaron
110 East Park
Miller
Avenue,SD
Box 8
57362
U.S.A.
3684 Lowell Lutz915 E. Fesler
Dallas
TX
75043
U.S.A.
4158 Keith Lucas56 South Euclid
Chicago IL
60542
U.S.A.
4175 Karen Ng 2134 ElmhillKlamath
Pike Falls
OR
97603
U.S.A.
5510 Ken Soule 58 Sansome
Aurora
Street CO
89022
U.S.A.
IS 257 – Fall 2004
Phone
First Contact
(902) 555-88881/29/95
(415) 555-43212/2/93
(317) 555-36441/5/93
(415) 555-91843/9/98
(206) 555-75803/12/99
(719) 555-20103/15/97
(808) 555-50501/29/99
(415) 555-64302/18/99
(212) 555-67501/30/99
(613) 555-43333/16/98
(214) 555-27222/15/99
(312) 555-43103/17/98
(503) 555-47003/20/99
(303) 555-66952/5/99
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 36
Dive Order = DIVEORDS
Order No Customer No
Sale Date
307
1480
9/1/99
310
1481
9/1/99
313
1909
9/1/99
314
1913
9/1/99
317
1969
9/1/99
320
2001
9/1/99
321
2306
9/1/99
325
2589
9/1/99
326
3333
9/1/99
327
3684
9/1/99
329
4158
9/1/99
330
4175
9/1/99
331
5510
9/1/99
333
5926
9/1/99
336
5719
9/1/99
IS 257 – Fall 2004
Ship Via
UPS
FedEx
Walk In
FedEx
FedEx
Walk In
Emery
Emery
FedEx
DHL
Walk In
FedEx
FedEx
DHL
FedEx
PaymentMethod
CcNumber CcExpDateNo Of People
Depart DateReturn DateDestinationVacationCost
Visa
12345 678 90 1/1/01
2 11/8/00 11/15/00 Fiji
10000
Check
1
4/4/00
4/18/00 Santa Barbara 6000
Visa
456456456 9/11/00
4 6/27/00
7/11/00 Cozumel
8000
Check
3
2/7/00
2/14/00 Monterey
6000
AmEx
432432432 12/31/02
4
5/9/00
5/16/00 Fiji
20000
Cash
1 10/10/00 10/17/00 Santa Barbara 3000
Master Card
1112223334 8/12/00
1 3/15/00
4/12/00 New Jersey
8000
AmEx
332332332 12/10/99
1 3/15/00
4/12/00 New Jersey
8000
Money Order
2 2/10/00
2/17/00 Monterey
4000
Master Card
122122321 11/9/99
4 3/10/00
3/23/00 Florida
24000
Cash
1
5/4/00
5/15/00 Cozumel
1571
Check
2
7/3/00
7/10/00 Florida
6000
Money Order
6 6/20/00
6/30/00 Santa Barbara 36000
Discover 123123123 12/21/00
2 6/10/00
6/17/00 Fiji
10000
Cash
10
4/2/00
4/24/00 Great Barrier Reef
200000
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 37
Line item = DIVEITEM
Order No Item No
307
90010
307
90020
307
90021
307
90030
307
90051
310
90011
310
90045
310
90059
310
90074
310
90078
313
90127
314
90072
314
90094
314
90100
317
90012
IS 257 – Fall 2004
Rental/SaleQty
Rental
Rental
Rental
Rental
Rental
Rental
Rental
Rental
Rental
Rental
Sale
Rental
Rental
Rental
Sale
Line Note
4
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
2
This is our most popular mask.
These are our best selling fins.
A good weight belt for beginners
Holds 10 cubic feet of cargo.
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 38
Shipping information = SHIPVIA
Ship Via
DHL
Emery
FedEx
UPS
US Mail
IS 257 – Fall 2004
Ship Cost
8
11
12
10
6
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 39
Dive Equipment Stock= DIVESTOK
Item No
90010
90011
90012
90020
90021
90022
90023
90024
90025
90030
90031
90032
90033
90040
90041
90042
IS 257 – Fall 2004
DescriptionEquipment On
Class
Hand Reorder Point
Cost
Sale Price Rental Price
Shotgun 2 Snorkel - Clear
12
2 $18.00
$30.00
$2.00
Shotgun 2 Snorkel - Red
12
2 $18.00
$30.00
$2.00
Shotgun 2 Snorkel - Teal
11
2 $18.00
$30.00
$2.00
Tri-Vent Mask
Mask
- Clear
14
2 $62.50 $100.00
$5.00
Tri-Vent Mask
Mask
- Red
10
2 $62.50 $100.00
$5.00
Tri-Vent Mask
Mask
- Teal
14
2 $62.50 $100.00
$7.00
Quad Vision
Mask
Mask - Clear
11
2 $48.25
$80.00
$7.00
Quad Vision
Mask
Mask - Red
13
2 $48.25
$80.00
$7.00
Quad Vision
Mask
Mask - Teal
10
2 $48.25
$80.00
$10.00
Sea Wing Fins
Fins - Clear
12
2 $60.00 $100.00
$12.00
Sea Wing Fins
Fins - Red
11
2 $60.00 $100.00
$12.00
Sea Wing Fins
Fins - Teal
12
2 $60.00 $100.00
$12.00
Jet Fin - Black
Fins
14
2 $30.00
$60.00
$10.00
D350 Second
Regulator
Stage
11
1 $162.50 $270.00
$20.00
G250 Second
Regulator
Stage
13
1 $144.50 $240.00
$20.00
G200 Second
Regulator
Stage
12
1 $105.25 $175.00
$20.00
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 40
Dive Locations = DEST
DestinationDestination
No
Avg
Name
Temp Avg
(F) Temp Spring
(C)
Temp
Spring
(F) Temp
Summer
(C) Temp
Summer
(F) Temp
Fall Temp
(C) (F)
Fall Temp (C)
Winter Temp
Winter
(F) Temp
Accomodations
(C)
Night Life
1 Cozumel
78
25.556
76
24.444
84
28.889
78
25.556
74
23.333 Cheap
Sleepy
2 Great Barrier Reef80
26.667
76
24.444
84
28.889
78
25.556
76
24.444 Moderate Pleasant
3 Monterey
60
15.556
62
16.667
64
17.778
64
17.778
58
14.444 Expensive Wild
4 Santa Barbara
75
23.889
73
22.777
78
25.556
72
22.222
70
21.111 Expensive Wild
5 Florida
77
25
75
23.889
85
29.444
78
25.556
70
21.111 Moderate Pleasant
6 Fiji
75
23.889
76
24.444
80
26.667
74
23.333
70
21.111 Expensive Sleepy
7 New Jersey
57
13.889
57
13.89
60
15.556
58
14.444
53
11.667 Expensive Pleasant
IS 257 – Fall 2004
Body of Water
Travel Cost
Caribbean
1000
Coral Sea
5000
Pacific
2000
Pacific
3000
Caribbean
3000
South Pacific 5000
Atlantic
2000
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 41
Dive Sites = SITE
Site No
DestinationSite
No Name
Site HighlightSiteDistance
NotesDistance
from Depth
Town
from(m)
(ft)Depth
Town (km)
(m) Visibility (ft)Visibility (m)
Current
1001
1 Palancar Reef Reef
10 16.09
100
30.48
150
45.72 Strong
1002
1 Santa Rosa ReefReef
8 12.87
80
24.384
150
45.72 Strong
1003
1 Chancanab ReefR eef
4 6.437
60
18.288
100
30.48 Mild
1004
1 Punta Sur
Reef
13 20.92
120
36.576
175
53.34 Strong
1005
1 Yocab Reef
Reef
6 9.656
50
15.24
100
30.48 Mild
2001
2 Heron Island
Reef
50 80.47
90
27.432
150
45.72 Mild
2002
2 Cod Hole
Fish
45 72.42
50
15.24
150
45.72 Mild
2003
2 Butterfly Bay
Caves
20 32.19
70
21.336
70
21.336 None
2004
2 Wheeler Reef Marine Life
30 48.28
50
15.24
125
38.1 Mild
2005
2 Watanabe
Marine Life
130 209.2
150
45.72
200
60.96 None
3001
3 Point Lobos
Marine Life
3 4.828
60
18.288
75
22.86 None
3002
3 Macabee BeachMarine Life
0.1 0.161
40
12.192
40
12.192 None
3003
3 Pinnacles
Pinnacle
1 1.609
60
18.288
50
15.24 Mild
3004
3 Monastery Beach
Marine Life
3 4.828
50
15.24
40
12.192 Surge
IS 257 – Fall 2004
Skill Level
Intermediate
Intermediate
Beginning
Advanced
Beginning
Intermediate
Beginning
Advanced
Beginning
Intermediate
Beginning
Beginning
Beginning
Beginning
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 42
Sea Life = BIOLIFE
Species NoCategory Common Name Species Name Length (cm)
Length (in)
Notes Graphic
90020 TriggerfishClown TriggerfishBallistoides conspicillum
50 19.685
90030 Snapper Red Emperor
Lutjanus sebae
60 23.622
90050 Wrasse Giant Maori Wrasse
Cheilinus undulatus 229 90.157
90070 Angelfish Blue Angelfish Pomacanthus nauarchus
30 11.811
90080 Cod
Lunartail RockcodVariola louti
80 31.496
90090 Scorpionfish
Firefish
Pterois volitans
38 14.961
90100 ButterflyfishOrnate Butterflyfish
Chaetodon Ornatissimus
19 7.4803
90110 Shark
Swell Shark
Cephaloscyllium ventriosum
102 40.157
90120 Ray
Bat Ray
Myliobatis californica 56 22.047
90130 Eel
California Moray Gymnothorax mordax 150 59.055
90140 Cod
Lingcod
Ophiodon elongatus 150 59.055
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 43
BIOSITE -- linking relation
Species No Site No
90010
2001
90010
2002
90010
2003
90010
2004
90010
2005
90010
6001
90010
6003
90010
6004
90010
6005
90020
2001
90020
2002
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 44
Shipwrecks = SHIPWRK
Ship Name Site No
Delaware
7007
F.S.Loop
4004
Gosford
4001
Great Isaac
7002
Lizzie D
7001
Mohawk
7004
R.P. Resor
7006
Star of Scotland 4002
Tolten
7008
USS Moody
4006
Valiant
4003
Category Type
Interest
TonnageLength (ft)
Length (m) Beam (ft)
Beam (m)
Commercial
Steam Freighter
Treasure
1646
252
76.8096
37
11.2776
Commercial
Steam Schooner
Machinery
794
193
58.8264
39
11.8872
Commercial
Barque Rigged
Fixture
Sail
2250
280
85.344
42
12.8016
Commercial
Seagoing Tug
Fixture
1117
185
56.388
37
11.2776
Commercial
Tug/Rumrunner
Treasure
122
84
25.6032
21
6.4008
PassengerOcean Liner
Treasure
8140
402 122.5296
54
16.4592
Commercial
Oil Tanker Treasure
7450
435
132.588 66.8 20.36064
PassengerBritish Q-Boat
Treasure
1250
263
80.1624
35
10.668
Commercial
Freighter Fixture
1858
280
85.344
43
13.1064
Military
WWI Destroyer
Treasure
1308
314
95.7072
31
9.4488
PassengerLuxury Motor
Treasure
Yacht
444 162.4 49.49952
26
7.9248
IS 257 – Fall 2004
Cause
Date Sunk Comments
Passengers/Crew
Survivors
Condition Graph
Fire
66
66 Broken
Deliberate
1/1/47
0
Scattered
Fire
Intact
Collision
4/16/47
27
27 Intact
Unknown 10/19/22
8
0 Intact
Collision
1/25/35
163
118 Scattered
Military
2/28/42
50
2 Broken
Weather
1/22/42
5
4 Broken
Military
3/13/42
28
1 Intact
Deliberate
1/1/33
0
Intact
Fire
12/17/30
25
25 Intact
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 45
Mapping to Other Models
• Hierarchical
– Need to make decisions about access paths
• Network
– Need to pre-specify all of the links and sets
• Object-Oriented
– What are the objects, datatypes, their
methods and the access points for them
• Object-Relational
– Same as relational, but what new datatypes
might be needed or useful (more on OR later)
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 46
Advantages of RDBMS
• Possible to design complex data storage
and retrieval systems with ease (and
without conventional programming).
• Support for ACID transactions
– Atomic
– Consistent
– Independent
– Durable
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 47
Advantages of RDBMS
• Support for very large databases
• Automatic optimization of searching (when
possible)
• RDBMS have a simple view of the
database that conforms to much of the
data used in businesses.
• Standard query language (SQL)
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 48
Disadvantages of RDBMS
• Until recently, no real support for complex
objects such as documents, video,
images, spatial or time-series data.
(ORDBMS add support for these).
• Often poor support for storage of complex
objects from OOP languages
(Disassembling the car to park it in the
garage)
• Still no efficient and effective integrated
support for things like text searching within
fields.
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 49
Lecture Outline
• Review
– Database Design -- Object-Oriented
Modeling
• Logical Design for the Diveshop
database
• Normalization
• Access Database Creation
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 50
Database Creation in Access
• Simplest to use a design view
– wizards are available, but less flexible
• Need to watch the default values
• Helps to know what the primary key is, or
if one is to be created automatically
– Automatic creation is more complex in other
RDBMS and ORDBMS
• Need to make decision about the physical
storage of the data
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 51
Database Creation in Access
• Some Simple Examples
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 52
Next Time
• Normalization and the Relational Model
• Expanding and redesigning DiveShop
IS 257 – Fall 2004
2004.09.20 - SLIDE 53
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