Year Two in a Global
Behavioral Safety Implementation
Tenneco Automotive’s Strategy and Results to
Maintain Focus and Achieve Sustainability
Tim Gordon, CIH, CSP; Tenneco Automotive
John Heussner, PhD, CIH; Tenneco Automotive
Don Groover, CIH, CSP; Behavioral Sciences Technology, Inc.
American Industrial Hygiene Conference and Exposition
“PREVENTION— Our Mission for the 21st Century”
Orlando, May 22, 2000
© 2000 by Timothy A. Gordon
Worldwide Facilities
Ride Control
Emission Control
Elastomers
Headquarters
The Behavioral Accident
Prevention Process®
4 Essential Elements

Identifying behaviors

Data gathering

Providing feedback

Removing Barriers
©1997 Behavioral Science Technology, Inc ®. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission.
The Behavioral Accident
Prevention Process®
©1997 Behavioral Science Technology, Inc ®. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without written permission.
Implementation Strategy

Leadership

Global Implementation

Internal Consultants

Communication

Performance Metrics
Strategy
Leadership

Rethinking how employee safety and
health is integrated into the business

Injury-Free Careers vs. Total Case Rate

TCR of 2.0 by 2000, “Here’s a tool to get
there.”
Strategy
Global Implementation

Pilot delays implementation

Staged roll-outs have a high failure rate

U.S. approach frequently unsuccessful
outside North America

Desire for global culture
Strategy
Internal Consultants

In-house Expertise

Language and Culture

Intensive Training by BST

Develop Site Self-Sufficiency
Strategy
Communications

Introductory video

Communications Network

Translation of materials

Performance metrics
Strategy
Performance Metrics

Percent employees trained

Observation (contact) rate

Observation quality
Year 2 Challenges

Transition from Process Construction to
Process Maintenance

Internal Consultant Staffing

Reorganizations and Turnovers

The Business

“Flat” Performance in 1999
Tenneco Automotive
Total Case Rate
5.50
Favora ble
Monthly TCR
12 Month AVG
5.00
4.50
TCR
4.00
3.50
3.00
2.50
beginning of BAPP Initiative
2.00
8
8
00 r-00
00
98
98 t-98 v-98 -98 -99 b-99 r-99 r-99 -99 -99 l-99
99
99 t-99 v-99
99
98
-9
-9
y
n
n
c
c- an- ebg- epa
a
ul- ug- epu
p
c
c
o
o
e
ay Jun
a
a
u
e
e
u
J
J
J
A
J
J
O
N
F
M
O
N
F
M
A
S
D
A
S
D
M
M
Year 2 Enhancements

Video: “Behavioral Safety in Action”

Demonstrated the Impact on Safety
Dec-99
Oct-99
Aug-99
Jun-99
25
Apr-99
Feb-99
Dec-98
30
Oct-98
Aug-98
Jun-98
Apr-98
Feb-98
Dec-97
Oct-97
Aug-97
Jun-97
Total Case Rate
Marshall, Michigan Plant
Monthly Injury Rates
35
Observat ions
Begin
Favorable
20
15
10
5
0
Year 2 Enhancements

Video: “Behavioral Safety in Action”

Demonstrated the Impact on Safety

Focus on Improving Observation Quality
–

Coaching Contact Rate
Communicated the Impact on Productivity
Productivity
Impact on Labor Efficiencies (Seward, Nebraska)
100
1.2
1.1
1
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4
95
90
85
80
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Observation Rate Target
Observations
Total Labor Efficiency
Year 2 Enhancements

Formal Process Assessments

Began Integration with other Business
Processes

Convinced Senior Management that BBS
was a Key Business Metric

Encouraged Regional Facilitator Networks
Implementation Results

Process now active in 69 facilities in 20
countries

4,771 trained observers

3,339 trained “observees”

14,000 employees observed and given
feedback every month
Historical Safety Performance
Total Case Rate
25
19.8
20
15
19.2
19.1
20.3
17.5
16.2
13.7
15.3
13.5
12.4
10
10
16.9
9.3
5
7.6
6.1
4.3
4
0
1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
Tenneco Automotive
Industry Average
Assessment Results
Process Implementation Elements
37 Plants through 4-17-00
70%
62.7%
60%
52.6%
52.4%
51.3%
50%
42.6%
40%
30%
Overall Process
Organization and
Management
Critical Behavior
Identification,
Definition, and
Communication
Data Gathering
Feedback
Barrier Removal
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