Numeracy Across the Curriculum
St Alban’s Catholic
High School
Influencing Attitudes
• Poor learning experiences and fear of getting the ‘wrong’
answer contribute to the negative impression many adults
have of mathematics. Problems can be created if these
views are passed on to pupils by staff or parents.
• Some teachers may put pupils under pressure in their
lessons to perform mathematical routines that are
insufficiently developed or are unfamiliar, this can
reinforce negative feelings which pupils may already have.
• Some teachers may avoid the mathematical elements of
their subject, thereby losing opportunities to demonstrate
the necessity of mathematics.
Aims of the day
• To introduce teachers to the underlying principles
of the National Numeracy Strategy.
and
• To begin the process of ensuring that there exists a
consistency of practice across the curriculum.
Approaches to Mathematics
Estimation Skills
48.34 / 5.13 =
50 / 5 = 10
14.56 x 10.6 =
15 x 11 = 165
15 x 10 = 150
E stim ation G am e
1 4 .49
1 638
2 0 .1
5 .67
54
9 .6
1 26 .7 2
30
7
1 43 .9 9
52
9 6 .6
E stim ation G am e
1 4 .49
1 638
2 0 .1
5 .67
2.1 x 6.9
42 x 39
62.31 / 3.1
6.8 x 0.9
54
9 .6
1 26 .7 2
30
5130 / 95
62 / 9.8
12.8 x 9.9
930 / 31
7
1 43 .9 9
52
9 6 .6
4 8 .51 / 6 .9 3
1 1 .9 x 12 .1
26 / 0.5
46 x 2.1
Mental Calculations
45 + 46 =
2039 - 1996 =
60 - 19 =
37 + 198 =
23 x 42
x
40
2
20
800
40
3
120
6
800 + 40 + 120 + 6 = 966
16 x 54
10 x 54 = 540
+
5 x 54 = 270
+
1 x 54 = 54
16 x 54 = 864
16 x 54
-
2 x 54 = 108
20 x 54 = 1080
4 x 54 = 216
16 x 54 = 864
38724
387
10 x 24 = 240
147
5 x 24 = 120
27
1 x 24 = 24
3
Answer: 16 r 3 or 16 3/24
-
32024
1 x 24 = 24
2 x 24 = 48
4 x 24 = 96
8 x 24 = 192
192 + 96 = 288 + 24 = 312
32024
1 x 24 = 24
2 x 24 = 48
4 x 24 = 96
8 x 24 = 192
192 + 96 = 288 + 24 = 312
Answer:
1+4+8 =12 r 8 or 12 8/24
Problem Solving
and Discussion
Brainteaser 1
Solve the following brainteaser, without discussing it.
In a mathematics test, no two pupils scored the same.
Brian scored less than 4 and Julie scored more than 6,
but did not get full marks. Simon’s score was the sum
of Brian’s and David’s. Rachel scored three times as
many as Brian. Brian, Julie and Rachel all scored even
numbers, while Simon’s and David’s scores were both
odd. David’s score was half of Rachel’s.
What did each pupil score out of 10?
Brainteaser 1
Brian
2 out of 10
Julie
8 out of 10
Simon
5 out of 10
David
3 out of 10
Rachel
6 out of 10
Brainteaser 2
Real-Life Graphs
Washing Up
Give a plausible explanation for the shape of this graph.
© Cr own copyright 2001
Scales
0
10
3
© Crown copyright 2001
Scales
0
20
6
© Crown copyright 2001
Scales
2
3.5
© Crown cop yright 2001
7
Mental Imagery
Listen carefully and draw
what you see in your mind.
Some possible visualisations
The Handling Data Cycle
Common difficulties in
Handling Data
• Graphs and charts are incorrectly drawn or
labelled
For example, the bars in a bar chart representing the
votes cast for candidates in a school election are
joined together or are of different widths
• Graphs and charts are read incorrectly or
interpreted inappropriately
For example, the vertical scale marked in thousands
on a population graph is misread: 350 000 is read as
350
Common difficulties in
Handling Data
• Mean, median and mode are confused or used
inappropriately
For example, the mean is used when referring to the
average monthly rainfall in India
• Data are represented by inappropriate graphs or
charts
For example, a pie chart is used to represent the
distances of the different planets from the Sun
Common difficulties in
Handling Data
• Activities are aimless or contexts inappropriate
For example, vast quantities of data are collected
without any consideration of the purpose of the
enquiry
• Undue time is spent on mechanical skills and there
is insufficient emphasis on interpreting data and
making inferences
For example, pupils are taught to draw pie charts or
calculate a mean without understanding of when it is
appropriate to use these or how to interpret them
The Handling Data Cycle
Handling Data Video
The Ofsted framework for school
inspection (September 2012)
When evaluating the achievement of pupils, inspectors
consider how well:
• pupils develop a range of skills, including reading, writing,
communication and mathematical skills, and how well they
apply these across the curriculum
[Section 52 Page 17]
The Way Forward
• Agreed approaches to calculation (including
calculations involving fractions, percentages, ratio)
• School policy on calculator use
• Agreed mathematical vocabulary and notation
• Lists of units used for measurement
• Agreed methods for drawing and labelling graphs,
charts and diagrams
• References to reasoning, communicating,
investigating and problem solving in schemes of work
The Way Forward
• References to Mental Imagery and oral work
• An ongoing part of the School Improvement Plan
• References to Numeracy included in Departmental
Schemes of work
• Glossary
• Displays in classrooms
Cross-Curricular Priorities
• To improve accuracy, particularly in
calculation, measurement and work involving
formulae
• To improve interpretation and presentation of
graphs, charts and diagrams
• To improve reasoning and problem solving
Cross-Curricular Priorities
O p p o rtu n itie s e xist to im p ro ve
in te rp re ta tio n a n d p re se n ta tio n o f
g ra p h s, ch a rts a n d d ia g ra m s
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Maths in other Subjects
By referring to your schemes of work
please identify what opportunities exist
in your subject area, that satisfy the
cross-curricular numeracy objectives.
Please go to the
following rooms
Design and Technology
Geography, June and Dennis
Science
History and RE and Chris
ICT and Celia
Languages
Music, Art and PE
Caroline and Maureen
S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
S6
PSA
PSA
Numeracy Across the Curriculum
St Alban’s Catholic
High School
Calculator skills expected by
the end of Year 6
• Use a calculator to perform a one-step calculation and
interpret the result
• Key in and interpret money and measurement
calculations
• Extend to calculations with more than one step, e.g. 18
x (137 + 258)
• Recognise rounding errors, e.g. recognise 2.9999999
as 3
• Recognise negative numbers and use the sign change
key if appropriate
Calculator skills expected by
the end of Year 6
• Find decimals equivalent to fractions
• Recognise recurring decimals, e.g. 0.33333333
• Start to use memory keys and perform more complex
calculations, such as: (234 + 739) ÷ (145 – 89)
• Have a feel for the size of an answer and check it
appropriately
Calculator Skills
Q 1.
Q 2.
Q 3.
23
2  33
233
0.66666
2
-2.33333
Q 4.
2  (3  3)
No solution
Q 5.
2  3 4
14
3 . 1  4 . 23
1.397
Q 6.
4 . 6  2 . 04
6   3 .1  6 .3   1 .6
3
Q 7.
203.79
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