Broward County Office of Prevention Programs
and
Safe Schools South Florida Present:
Bullying
and
Sexual Minority Youth Issues
101
www.SafeSchoolsSouthFlorida.org
PO Box 24444, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33307
(305) 576-2126 ~ (954) 771-4799
[email protected]
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© 2010-2011
Agenda
 Welcome
 Who is Safe Schools South Florida?
 Goals of the workshop
 Why we are here today
 Issues facing LGBTQ students
 Student panel and questions
 As professionals, how do we respond?
 Strategies for helping professionals
 Utilizing resources
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Welcome
 Acknowledgements
 Thank you:




The Graves Charitable Fund of the Community Foundation of Broward.
Gamma Mu Foundation.
Aqua Foundation.
Office of Prevention Programs of Broward County Schools.
 Introductions
 Who we are.
 Who are you?
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How We Fulfill Our Mission
 We empower students
 We train educators
 We educate parents and the
public
 We review our programs for
value and improvement
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“I hate you people for leaving me out of so
many fun things…you had my number and I
asked and all, but no, no, no, no --- don’t let the
weird looking Eric kid come along.”
From the journal of Eric Harris,
Columbine High School shooter
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Common Reasons for Bullying
and Harassment in School
Source:
From Teasing to Torment: School Climate in America,
A Survey of Students and Teachers
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Work
background
Gender
Race
Learning
style
Age
Education
Religion
Dimensions
of
Diversity
Geographic
location
Appearance
Class:
socioeconomic
Ability
Language
Ethnicity
Sexual
Orientation
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Broward County School Board
Policy
The School Board of Broward County, Florida (Hereinafter referred to as “The Board”) shall not
discriminate against students, employees, applicants, contractors, or individuals participating in
school board sponsored activities. The school board is committed to the provision of equal access
in all student, employment, and business programs, activities, services, and operations that are
operated or provided directly by The Board, as well as those operated or provided by another
entity on behalf of The Board under contractual or other arrangements. This policy is
established to provide an environment free from discrimination and harassment based
upon age, race, color, disability, gender, marital status, national origin, religion, or sexual
orientation.
It is the intent of this policy, and respective procedures, to support and implement protections
against discrimination and harassment as prohibited by the constitution, federal and state
statutes, county ordinance, and all other applicable laws or regulations.
AUTHORITY: F.S. 230.22(1)(2) & The Federal Americans with Disability Act
Policy Adopted 9/5/74
Policy Amended: 7/22/75; 3/4/82; 7/14/87; 5/18/93 Amended Policy Approved 3/18/97
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BCPS Bullying and
Harassment Policy
Adopted July 2009
“Bullying” means systematically and chronically
inflicting physical hurt or psychological distress on
one or more students or employees.
It is further defined as:
unwanted purposeful written, verbal, nonverbal, or physical behavior,
including but not limited to any threatening, insulting, or dehumanizing
gesture, by an adult or student, that has the potential to create an
intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational environment or cause long
term damage; cause discomfort or humiliation; or unreasonably interfere
with the individual’s school performance or participation, is carried out
repeatedly and is often characterized by an imbalance of power.
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Research Tells Us…
How did it feel to be displaced?
"At first I was in complete and utter shock but
soon after I started to believe that I was created
to demonstrate negativity. I felt that all of my
intellect, compassion, morals and talents were
soon to be abolished. I was sickened to look at
myself and after countless vain attempts to try
and be "normal" I felt there may be nothing to
live for. My mind was flooded, and still very
much is, with the painful reality that I would
never have a family again. I tried to escape
reality with false hopes and empty promises to
myself but none of this gave me a sense of
genuine hope.“
David Hitchcock
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Research Tells Us…
 Lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth are up to four
times more likely to attempt suicide than their
heterosexual peers.1
 Nearly half of young transgender people have
seriously thought about taking their lives and one
quarter report having made a suicide attempt.2
 Various studies have found depression strikes
LGBT youth four to five times more severely.
 Three-fifths (60.8%) of LGBT students felt unsafe
at school because of their sexual orientation.3
 LGBTQ teens have twice the number of unwanted
pregnancies as straight teens.
Sources:
1Massachusetts
2007 Youth Risk Survey
AH, D’Augelli AR - Suicide and Life Threatening Behavior 2007
32007 GLSEN National School Climate Survey
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2Grossman
An 11-year-old
Massachusetts boy, Carl
Joseph Walker-Hoover,
hanged himself after
enduring bullying at
school, including daily
taunts of being gay,
despite his mother's
weekly pleas to the
school to address the
problem.
http://www.glsen.org/cgibin/iowa/all/news/record/24
00.html
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Biased Language in School
 Homophobic remarks are the most common
type of biased language heard at school:
 Approximately 90% of students hear “that’s so
gay” or ”you’re so gay” frequently.
 Approximately three quarters of students hear
other homophobic remarks (e.g., “dyke” or
“faggot”) frequently.
 Nearly a fifth of students hear homophobic
remarks from teachers or other school staff.
Source:
2007 GLSEN School Climate Survey
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Biased Language in School
 Negative remarks about gender expression were
also common:
 Just over half of students hear frequent remarks
about someone not acting masculine enough and
39% heard remarks about someone not acting
feminine enough.
 More than a quarter (28%) of students hear
negative remarks about gender expression from
teachers or other school staff.
Source:
2007 GLSEN School Climate Survey
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Sexual Orientation:
One of the Human Diversities
 Heterosexual
 Homosexual
 Bisexual
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Paradigm of Human Sexuality
Sexual
Behavior
Gender
Role
Sexual
Orientation
Gender
Identity
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Sexual Behavior
Heterosexual
Bisexual
Homosexual
 Sexual behavior is a choice.
 Behaving homosexually does not necessarily mean that
one’s sexual orientation is homosexual.
 Likewise behaving heterosexually does not necessarily
mean that one is heterosexual.
 Significant numbers of people have engaged in both
heterosexual and homosexual behavior.
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Sexual Orientation
Heterosexual
Bisexual
Homosexual
 Sexual orientation seems to be formed at a very
early age.
 Adolescence and early adulthood are an unfolding of that
orientation.
 The development of sexual orientation does not seem to
be a choice.
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Gender Identity
Male
Androgyne
Female
 Gender identity is the sense of “I am male” or “I am
female.”
 Formed at a very early age and not subject to choice.
 Gender identity is revealed by feelings, dreams and fantasies
about one’s body and genitals.
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Gender Role
Masculine
Androgynous
Feminine
 Gender role most often reflects the ways in which our culture
invites us to behave depending on our genitals.
 Gender role is similar to sexual behavior in that it is a choice.
 “Be a man”
 “Act like a lady”
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Counselors and Teachers:
Responding to Students
Find Privacy
Assure Confidentiality
Maintain Calm
Be Honest with Yourself
Validate Feelings
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Counselors and Teachers:
Responses to Coming Out
 Recognize the importance of this process for the gay
student.
 Respect the risk the student is taking by coming out to
you.
 Show your appreciation and support of the student.
 Help to make it a happy occasion.
 Also remember to never out a student to parents,
guardians, or others due to possible severe ramifications
for the student.
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Step One and Step Two:
Identify the Bullying or Harassment:
Connect and Reflect
 Be assertive, yet connect with the aggressor. Label the
form of harassment: “Paul, you just made a harassing
comment based upon… appearance, race, ethnicity,
religion, gender, sexual orientation, economic status,
abilities, size, age, etc.).
 Do not imply the target is a member of that identifiable
group.
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Step Three:
Say What’s Not Okay
 Do not personalize your response at this stage:
 Consider this: “We at ____ school do not harass
people – we do however ensure that everyone here
feels welcome and valued.”
 Re-identify the offensive behavior: “This name
calling/this type of language can also be hurtful to
others who overhear it.”
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Step Four:
Request a Change and/or
Ask for Change in Future Behavior
 “So, let’s give it a rest.” “______ is a great school, let’s keep it that
way, okay?”
 “Jessica, please cut it out. I know you and am sure you can make
the right decision.”
 “Miguel, please pause and think before you act.” “We want
everyone to be safe at this school.”
 Check in with the target, either offline or in the moment, depending
on context and situation: “If this continues, please tell me, and I will
take further action, and/or we will talk about what to do next.”
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Intervening in
Anti-gay Bullying
 It might sound like this:
 Connect: “Vanessa, you’ve got a great head on your
shoulders.” PAUSE…
 Reflect: “But, I just overheard you call Jylene a dyke,
and it doesn’t look like she’s laughing.”
 Say What’s Not Okay: “Calling her a dyke is a
putdown and our school is a place where everyone is
valued and respected.”
 Request a Change: “So, stop it/cut it out. I have
confidence in you to make good choices.”
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© 2010-2011
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