English Language Learner
Valeria Silva ELL Director St. Paul Public Schools
Collaboration: A Model for Success for Literacy
Valeria Silva • Director, ELL Programs • Saint Paul Public Schools
Who are our students?
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Who are our students?
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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District Overview
District Overview
Saint Paul Public Schools
Saint Paul, Minnesota
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
Diverse urban school district, largest in state
42,009 students; more than 100 schools and programs
17,997 with home language other than English: 43% of students
103 home languages and dialects
 Largest: Hmong, Spanish, Somali
 SPPS ELL population makes up 27% of state ELL population
 SPPS ELL population makes up 42% of the district’s total
student population
 Since 1990, the ELL population in SPPS has increased by more
than 270%
 1,700 Hmong refugee students from Wat Tham Krabok enrolled
in SPPS between 2004-2006
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Which Students are considered
English Language Learners in MN
Students:
• Whose home language is other than English
• Who lack the English language skills as
determined by appropriate measures and
practices (developmentally appropriate
assessment instruments, observations, teacher
judgment, parent recommendations and/or state
tests )
• Those who score lower than 4 in the Writing
section of the Test of Emerging Academic
English (TEAE), and 5 in the Reading section
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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SPPS Student Language Distribution
2005-2006
Top 8 Languages in SPPS
Language
Approx. Count
English
24,000
Hmong
10,600
Spanish
4,100
Somali
700
Vietnamese
335
Amharic
235
Burmese/Karen
220
Oromo
170
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Closing the Gap
In the Council of the Great City
Schools Beating the Odds VI report
(2006), SPPS stands out as having
made among the best gains of the
Great City Schools districts in closing
the achievement gap between ELL
and non-ELL students.
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Special Education & ELL
SPPS Special Ed as a Percent of Each Language Group Spring 2006
25.00%
P ercen t
20.00%
15.00%
10.00%
5.00%
0.00%
Pct ELL
Amhari
c
Cambo
dian
Chinese
English
Hmong
Karen
Oromiff
a
Somali
Spanish
Tigriny
a
Vietna
mese
Others
4.44%
10.48%
5.94%
21.49%
10.52%
1.82%
4.76%
7.44%
15.11%
8.18%
10.37%
13.79%
Language
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Special Education & ELL
SPPS ELL Special Education Distribution Spring 2006
Other health disabilities
5%
Autism spectrum disorder
Deaf–hard of hearing
3%
7%
DevCogDisMild-moderate
(DCD1)
4%
DevCogDisSevere-profound
(DCD2)
3%
Speech/language impaired
23%
Developmental delay (DD)
8%
Emotional/behavioral
disorders (EBD)
3%
Specific learning disabilities
(LD)
44%
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Special Education & ELL
SPPS NonELL and ELL Special Ed Distribution Spring 2006
8000
7000
6000
Co u n t
5000
4000
3000
2000
1000
0
Autism
spectrum
disorder
Deaf–hard of
hearing
DevcogdisMil
d-moderate
(DCD1)
DevcogdisSe
vereProfound
(DCD2)
Development
al delay
(DD)
Emotional/b
ehavioral
disorders
(EBD)
Specific
learning
disabilities
(LD)
Speech/lang
uage
impaired
Other health
disabilities
Total
TotNoELL
243
80
326
130
383
1145
1223
932
743
5205
ELLCount
54
135
86
59
164
69
885
447
136
2035
Classification/Count
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Factors in Managing Complex Change
Vision + Skills
Skills
Vision +
+ Incentive + Resources + Action Plan = Change
+ Incentive + Resources + Action Plan = Confusion
Incentive + Resources + Action Plan = Anxiety
Resources + Action Plan = Resistance
Vision + Skills
Vision + Skills
+ Incentive
Vision + Skills + Incentive + Resources
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
+ Action Plan = Frustration
= Treadmill
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ELL Vision
Support staff to move from a pull-out model to a push-in model of
ELL instruction by:
•Aligning district and state ELL standards
•Expecting all staff to use ELL and mainstream standards during instruction
•Raising expectations of ELL teachers on what ELL students can accomplish
•Provide professional development to ELL and mainstream staff on collaboration
•Provide professional development to ELL on collaboration in district-wide
Writers and Readers Workshop models (SPPS literacy reform model)
•Provide materials and resources to embed ELL instruction during Writers and
Readers Workshop
•Provide on-site coaching support and study groups for ELL teachers
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Why Collaboration?
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Moving from Pull-out to Collaboration
Collaboration is not just two or more individuals working
together.
–It involves joint planning, delivery, and evaluation of instructional
practices students results and performance.
–Teachers take risks and support each other in the process of ongoing
learning and improvement of practice that is focused on student
achievement.
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Overview of Clustering
In schools with a relatively low percentage of ELL students, no more than
38-40%, clustering is the best method for providing more ELL support
•
•
•
•
•
•
Developing consistent school-wide guidelines for student placement
(according to language proficiency, home language, or academic
needs) can strengthen instructional services.
Clustering is not segregation. Students in clustered classrooms have
equal access to all instructional resources and overall better support.
All school staff must understand the rationale and system for student
placement so that new students are placed appropriately.
Academic needs of students, and NOT equality of class size or racial
diversity should guide student placement decisions.
The ELL cluster classroom(s) per grade level should not be the classes
where the low academic performing students get placed. The Englishspeaking students that are in the ELL Cluster classroom should
represent a range of academic abilities.
Mainstream teacher and ELL teachers must have common prep times
in order to work collaboratively.
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Students benefit from this clustering model because:
Native language, culture and emotional support for students:
• Clustering can be done by students' native language, to provide more bilingual
support during instruction time
• More language learner role models
• More opportunities to interact with other newcomer peers outside of school due
to the relationships developed in class
• Social and emotional support from peers who look the same and share the same
language
Students can:
• Teachers provide more differentiation of the instruction to students (harder to
ignore a large group of students)
• Access to additional materials that are appropriate for newcomers and ELLs
• More opportunities to interact with more than one adult (ELL + Mainstream)
• More opportunities to hear more than one adult language model (ELL +
Mainstream)
More instructional support and professional development opportunities for staff
• Mainstream teachers who have ELL licensure as well as elementary licensure
are the best candidates to be the teacher in this model
• Instruction provided by a mainstream teacher that has more additional training
on working with newcomers and ELL students
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Gr a de
Le v el
Kin d er g ar ten
1 st G rade
2 nd G rade
3 rd G rade
4 th G rade
5 th G rade
6 th G rade
Cla s s A
Non ELL /E L L
Cla s s A
14 /8
Cla s s A
17 /7
Cla s s B
Non ELL /E L L
Cla s s B
18 /0
Cla s s B
24 /0
Cla s s A
16 /5
Cla s s A
17 /7
Cla s s A
18 /6
Cla s s A
18 /8
Cla s s A
17 /7
Cla s s B
23 /0
Cla s s B
23 /1
Cla s s B
17 /7
Cla s s B
22 /2
Cla s s B
24 /0
Gr a de
Tot a l
ELL T ea ch e r
Workin g with
2-3 cla ss es
32 /8
ELL T. #1
38 /7
ELL T. #1
39 /5
ELL T. #1
40 /8
ELL T. #2
35 /1 3
ELL T. #2
40 /1 0
EL L T. #3
41 /7
ELL T. #3
SPPS ELL Instructional Model
Philosophy:
•Language through content
(collaboration with ELL &
mainstream teachers)
•Supported by language
acquisition strategies
•Grade-level content made
comprehensible using scaffolding
and sheltered English
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Old ELL Instructional Model
QuickTime™ and a
TIFF (LZW) decompressor
are needed to see this picture.
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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New ELL Instructional Model
QuickTime™ and a
TIFF (LZW) decompressor
are needed to see this picture.
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Collaboration
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Basics of Co-Teaching
• Professionals working together (ELL and
mainstream staff)
• Delivering substantive instruction in
reading and writing
• A diverse group of students
• A single space
• Reduced student-teacher ratio
• Professional development during coteaching
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Basics of Co-Teaching
Station teaching
One teach, one observe
One teach, one
support
Team teaching
Alternative teaching
Parallel teaching
Adapted from: Friend, M. & Barsack, W. (1990). Including students with special needs:
A practical guide for classroom teachers. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Co-Teaching Models Working Form
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Professional Development for All Staff
• ELL department provides professional
development on collaboration for ELL
and mainstream staff
• Since 2001, more than 500 mainstream and ELL
teachers have received this professional development
•100% of ELL teachers have completed professional
development on Writers Workshop.
•By fall 2006, 100% of ELL teachers will have
completed professional development in Readers
Workshop
• 100% of ELL bilingual paraprofessionals have
received professional development in Readers and
Writers Workshop
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Co-teaching Models
Key
Language Academy
ELL
Non-ELL
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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During Writers Workshop Model
ELL Instruction
mini-lesson 1
ELL
GE
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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During Writers Workshop Model
ELL Instruction
mini-lesson 2
GE
ELL
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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During Writers Workshop Model
ELL Instruction
mini-lesson 3
ELL
GE
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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During Writers Workshop Model
ELL Instruction
mini-lesson 4
GE
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
ELL
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During Writers Workshop Model
ELL Instruction
work time (first 10 minutes)
ELL
GE
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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During Writers Workshop Model
ELL Instruction
work time (remaining 30 minutes)
GE
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
ELL
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During Writers Workshop Model
ELL Instruction
share time 1
GE
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
ELL
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During Writers Workshop Model
ELL Instruction
share time 2
ELL
GE
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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During Writers Workshop Model
ELL Instruction
share time 3
GE
ELL
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Test scores
They look fantastic!
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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BST Reading—Closing the Gap
2005 Grade 8 BST Reading Percent Passing SPPS LEP & Non LEP
80
70
P e r c e n t P a s s in g
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
SPPS LEP
40.95
32.9
40.97
42.09
64.15
SPPS NonLEP
63.42
67.95
65.25
66.09
65.96
Year
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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BST Math—Closing the Gap
2005 Grade 8 BST Math Percent Passing SPPS LEP & Non LEP
60
P e rc e n t P a s s in g
50
40
30
20
10
0
SPPS LEP
SPPS NonLEP
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
38.96
32.9
36.56
30.38
47.22
51
56.13
50.65
50.08
49.64
Year
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Test of Emerging Academic English (TEAE)
TEAE Reading SPPS vs. State F04
300
250
Ave Score
200
SPPS
State
State w /o SPPS
150
100
50
0
3
4
5
6
7
8
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools
 2006
Grade
9
10
11
12
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Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment
(MCA)—State test
SPPS 2005 MCA Math & Reading 3 Year Trend
80.00
70.00
Index Points
60.00
50.00
40.00
30.00
20.00
10.00
0.00
All Students
LEP
All Students
SPPS
SPPS
SPPS
SPPS
2005 AYP Status: A
2005 AYP Status: A
2005 AYP Status: S
2005 AYP Status: S
Math
2003 Index Rate
2004 Index Rate
2005 Index Rate
LEP
70.67
68.76
75.93
Reading
63.97
64.40
73.28
69.67
67.44
73.61
Subject
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
56.70
58.87
67.72
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SAT10 Total Reading by Student Group,
2003-2005
90
2003
2004
2005
Percent of 80
students in 70
average or
above
60
average
50
range
40
30
20
10
0
Am.
Indian
Asian
Am.
Hisp. Afr-Am. Cauc.
Low
Am.
Income
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
ELL Special
Ed
44
SAT10 Total Math by Student Group,
2003-2005
2003
2004
2005
100
90
Percent of students
in average or above
average range
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Am. Asian Hisp. Afr-Am. Cauc. Low
ELL Special
Indian Am.
Am.
Income
Ed
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Closed Graduation Rate Achievement Gap
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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Adequate Yearly Progress — Title III
• 2004: SPPS as a district did not
make AYP, and it did not meet
AMAO requirements
• 2005: SPPS as a district did make
AYP and met AMAO
requirements
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Resources for Collaboration
BOOKS
•
•
•
•
Friend, M. & Barsack, W. (1990). Including Students With Special Needs:
A Practical Guide For Classroom Teachers. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Garmston, R. & Wellman, B. (1999). The Adaptive School: A Sourcebook
for Developing Collaborative Teams. Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon
Publishers.
Friend, M. & Cook, L. (2003). Interactions: Collaboration Skills for School
Professionals, 4th Ed. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Risko, V.J. and Bromley, K., Editors. (2001). Collaboration for Diverse
Learners: Viewpoints and Practices. Newark, DE: International Reading
Association.
VIDEO
• Burrello, L.C., Burrello, Jotham M., & Friend, M., Producers. (1996). The
Power of Two: Making a Difference Through Co-Teaching. Available from
The Forum on Education: 812-855-5090 (phone) or 812-855-8545 (fax).
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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For more information…
Visit our website at ell.spps.org
• Information about ELL programs in SPPS
• Data Center
• Fact sheets
• Professional development
Contact
• Phone: (651) 767-8320
• Fax: (651) 293-5411
• E-mail: [email protected]
English Language Learner Programs  Saint Paul Public Schools  2006
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