THE ROSE REVIEW –
IMPLICATIONS FOR PRIMARY
INTITIAL TEACHER EDUCATION
UCET 2009
Dr Samantha Twiselton – University of Cumbria
Dr Alice Hansen – University of Cumbria
Dr Sally Elton-Chalcraft – University of Cumbria
Dr Mark Chater - QCDA
Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency is the non-regulatory part of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority. © QCA 2009
Not Protected - Restricted- Confidential (Delete as Applicable)
The changing primary curriculum:
implications for ITT
Voices from student teachers and schools
Think-pair-share 1
The changing primary curriculum
Think-pair-share 2
How one provider is doing it
More voices from schools
Think-pair-share 3
Voices from student teachers
and schools
A case study: “Teachers as learners: curriculum
innovation with trainee teachers”
What do head teachers say?
“The advantage of having groups of students was in the
first instance the benefit of powerful collaboration on
creative ideas and the planning for implementation of them,
the opportunity to make professional use of individual skills
in specific curriculum areas.”
“It was possible also through the Skills-Based Approach to
link through every subject especially for Literacy and
mathematical skills, thereby contextualising the learning
and making it more meaningful.”
What do head teachers say?
“There were very high levels of pupil enjoyment and
tremendous opportunities created for development of
Speaking and Listening skills in particular. The school also
has a wealth of ICT resources and these were utilised to
the full. Staff were able to value fully the real advantages
of being able to transform the curriculum through the team
of students.”
“A fantastic week in which the generation and planning of
creative ideas were not constrained by thoughts of anything
being ‘impossible’.”
What do our NQTs say?
“I learned not to be afraid to give the children freedom to
explore.”
“Creativity is not just about drama, art and music etc. but
can be found in all aspects of the curriculum and this is why
finding meaningful links throughout your teaching is so
valuable.”
“The highlight for me was working as part of a team,
experimenting and bouncing ideas off colleagues and
having a flexible plan for the week which could incorporate
children’s ideas and questions.”
What do our NQTs say?
“What could be managed on the creative week has
to be done in part or in a very different way with the
everyday resource of one teacher and possibly a
teaching assistant.”
“I think the distinct teaching of the subjects on the
PgCE could be altered to better address the new
Primary Curriculum changes.”
Think-pair-share 1
From what you have seen and heard from the
primary school case studies …
What is new?
What is challenging?
What could work for you?
(5 minutes discussion)
Primary Review - building on EYFS :
From this…
…to this –
Oct 2009
Levels of Specification
(Mick Waters)
Content
H
stagnation
regimentation
OLD
fragmentation
L
NEW
Design
coherence
H
Interdependence is key
Curriculum with assessment:
personalising learning at every
level
THE REMIT
• help schools design engaging, challenging and inspiring
learning experiences to meet their pupils’ individual needs and
strengths - put personal development at the heart of the
curriculum
• encourage attitudes and attributes such as creativity and a
commitment to lifelong learning
• reflect what we know about how children learn - reflect the
distinctive features of the primary phase
• support learners’ transition into and out of the primary
curriculum
• meet the needs of our future society
• inspire and galvanise the workforce and promote public
understanding
The story so far…
Children’s Plan – December 2007
Independent review by Sir Jim
Rose – January 2008
Final report to Secretary of State –
April 2009
Public consultation – May to July
2009
Consultation reports to DCSF –
September 2009
The primary curriculum consultation
1057 survey responses
9 conferences attended by 750
educationalists
49 focus groups and seminars for 800
participants
Pupil consultation – 507 responses
Parent consultation – 375 responses
Hundreds of emails, letters, speaking
engagements, school visits…
Evidence Base
0-14 advisory group: including system
leaders, Ofsted, National Strategies, ITT
providers, TDA, Primary Heads
International comparison studies and probes
Subject expert group
Co-development
Evidence from Ofsted
Literature review
Commissioned research and probes
Universities and academics
Policy steer: Personal development, ICT,
flexibility
Evidence Base
0-14 advisory group: including system
leaders, Ofsted, National Strategies, ITT
providers, TDA, Primary Heads
International comparison studies and probes
Subject expert group
Co-development
Evidence from Ofsted
Literature review
Commissioned research and probes
Universities and academics
Policy steer: Personal development, ICT,
flexibility
Key messages from the final report
a well planned vibrant curriculum recognises that primary children relish
learning independently and cooperatively; they love to be challenged and
engaged in practical activities; they delight in the wealth of
opportunities for understanding more about the world’
Sir Jim Rose
‘
What is set out in the draft programmes of learning
represents a national entitlement with full scope for
teachers to shape and supplement it.’ Sir Jim Rose
‘
‘How schools choose to organise their curriculum and timetable
will remain a matter for them’ Sir Jim Rose
What are the implications of these changes for ITT?
Aims of the curriculum
• The aims of the
primary curriculum are
to enable all children
to become:
• successful
learners
• confident
individuals
• responsible
citizens
The essentials for learning and life
The essentials
are embedded
throughout the
whole curriculum
literacy, numeracy
and ICT capability
learning and thinking
skills, personal and
emotional skills and
social skills
Areas of learning
Religious Education is a statutory subject, with
a non-statutory programme of study.
Areas of learning
Understanding the
arts
Understanding English,
communication and
languages
Historical, geographical
and social understanding
– exciting children’s imaginations about
the arts and developing their creativity
– developing children’s language and
communication skills
– stimulating children’s curiosity about the
past and the present and their place in the
world
Areas of learning
Mathematical
understanding
Understanding physical
development, health and
wellbeing
Scientific and
technological
understanding
– developing children’s understanding of
mathematics and its use in everyday life
– developing children’s understanding of
what makes an active, healthy and
fulfilling life
– developing children’s understanding of the
natural and made worlds and the relationship
between science and technology
What’s in a programme of learning
Each area of learning has a common format and includes:
an importance
statement
essential knowledge
key skills
cross-curricular
studies
breadth of learning
curriculum
progression
Design tool specification
Design learning from critical staring points not
content
What are we trying to achieve?
How will we organise learning?
How do we know we are being successful?
Curriculum design should be rooted in school
improvement
Embed the essentials from the start
Build capacity and capability in the workforce
Create a new phase of curriculum designers to
sustain better learning and increased capability
Revolution or evolution? Time to reflect
With what you currently know
about the changing curriculum,
what are the challenges and
opportunities for improving
assessment and curriculum in
our schools and the impact on
ITT?
What happens next?
The revised national curriculum website goes live
at the end of January, featuring
Proposed statutory curriculum content
Online tools to support curriculum design
Case studies on specific aspects of the curriculum
Curriculum design guidance and a handbook are
being prepared for circulation to all schools early in
2010
The DCSF is setting up an implementation support
programme with key partners NCSL
April 2009-September 2011
Secretary of State accepts all of Jim’s recommendations
April 2009
Formal national consultation-complete 30 April-24th July 2009
Renewed primary curriculum sent to schools
Local authority briefing events
Publication and launch of curriculum design guidance,
website, handbooks
Launch of new curriculum
Jan 2010
Early Dec
Jan 2010
Sept 2011
Interdependence is key
Curriculum
Pedagogy
Assessment
All three elements work together for
effective learning and teaching
What can you do now?
Join our online forums
http://tiny.cc/qcdaprimary
Register to receive curriculum updates at
www.qcda.gov.uk/ and follow the links to e-newsletters
Thank you
Theresa Forbes [email protected]
Think-pair-share 2
From what you have seen and heard of the changing
primary curriculum …
What are the implications for …
Primary ITT programme aims and design ?
Primary ITT partnerships and settings, including links to
school improvement?
Primary ITT standards in knowledge and understanding?
(10 minutes discussion)
Primary QTS Programmes – mass
revalidation
Common framework across all programmes
Built around 3 main types of placement:
Beginning
Developing
Extending
An integrated approach
Some discreet subject time – but the ‘main’
subject is the uniqueness of the primary phase
Much more holistic
Needs to deliver efficiency gains
Pervading Ethos
Beginning/
The learner
Assessment
For Learning
Child
Development
Understanding English,
Communication and Languages 20
Mathematical understanding 20
Inclusion
Child Development(1)/
Principles of T & L 20
Intro to Skills and Attitudes
(HE and IT through a
possible subject interest?) 20
Creativity
100
Broadening/
Widening Community
School based
learning
Inclusion, Diversity & SEN 20
Creativity through a
cross curricular approach
(PSHE & global…) 20
Learning
environment
Reflective
Practice
Reflective practice in
the core subjects 20
60 specialism
i.e. 60 common
– 40 special
PLACEMENTS
Scientific and
Technological Understanding 20
Role of adult
and relationships,
working
with others
Developing /
Learning Community
Child Development (2) /
Learning Theory, NLP,
Personalised learning…20
Historical, Geographical and
Social Understanding 10
RE, Cultural and Global Understanding 10
PE & Wellbeing (PSHE) 10
Understanding & developing the
Arts 10
60 + 40 specialism
Or make them all 20
Learning Theory,
P4C, Enquiry, Thinking
Skills, Children’s Voices, NLP,
Participatory learning
Extending,
Deepening/
Research community
Current Issues in Education 20
Curriculum Managing and Thinking 20
Personalised
learning
Researching teacher
i.e. 40 common
60 specialism
Programme Distinctive Elements
4 YEAR DEGREE:
Main subject is the uniqueness of conceptual development within the
primary phase – specialisms are in depth explorations of this within a
curriculum area
Subject specialisms will be reconstructed around Programmes of Learning.
They will use:
QCDA aims,
Importance statements,
Concepts (Essential Knowledge)
Key skills and breadth of knowledge
3 YEAR DEGREE
Built around:
QCDA ‘Big picture
ECM outcomes
FT and Flexible Modular PGCEs
Offer Professional Graduate and Post Graduate Awards to range of student
teachers.
Creative
Able to work across
boundaries, imaginative,
flexible
Aims – to be:
ECM
outcomes
Stay Safe
Enjoy and Achieve
Year 1
Knowledge and Understanding of:
Children and selves as learners
Complexities of the statutory and wider curriculum
Progression, differentiation
Different theoretical perspectives
Holistic awareness of children
Why and how effective learning occurs – and act on
this
Year 2
The Learner [20]
Responsible
For own learning, others,
planning, teaching, assessing,
evaluating
Make a Positive Contribution Economic Well- Being
Skills in:
Teaching/planning/evaluating
All areas of the Primary Curriculum Team work
Questioning self and others
Time management
Classroom organisation and management
Studying
Applying theory to practice
Attitudes and Attributes – being:
Open-minded and adaptable
Motivated and determined
Accepting
Creative
Reflective
Informed by values
Curious, Well qualified, Risk - takers
The
Curriculum
Thinkers
Reflective, critical, questioning,
independent, challenging, Life –Long
Learners
Year 3
The Learning Community 1 [10]
The Wider Community [20]
The Learning Community 2 [10]
Foundation Subjects
PE, Geog, DT, MFL [20]
Creativity X Curriculum [20]
Foundation Subjects [20]
PE, Art, History, Music
Maths [10]
English [10]
Core X Curriculum [20]
Core [20]
Maths and Science
Science [10]
Managing Change [20]
Core [20]
English and ICT
ICT [10]
Specialist Theme [20]
The Undergraduate Teacher
[20]
Electives [20]
Specialist Theme [20]
Specialist Theme [20]
Specialist Theme [20]
School Experience
Varied
Assessment
Peer
Assessment
Individual
Feedback
Assessment for Learning
Advice given on Areas
To Develop
Linked to Programme
Aims
Placement and
University
Focused
Worthwhile
TDA Professional Standards for Teachers 2007
Learning
Outcomes
Be Healthy
Professional
Relationships, qualities, manner,
attitude, approach, commitment
PgCE (5-11 pathway): One model
Meeting children's needs within and beyond the curriculum (20 credits)
Improving learning and teaching through practitioner research (20 credits)
1
day
Beginning
placement
(4 weeks)
1
day
1
day
Developing
placement
(5 weeks)
1
day
1
day
C&E
placement
(1 week)
The Creative and Effective Curriculum (20 credits)
Areas of Learning (Primary Curriculum)
(Qualificatory)
Extending
placement
(7/8 weeks)
Think-pair-share 3
From your discussion, what changes will you advocate ?
What are you trying to achieve through programme aims
and partnership arrangements ?
How will you organise your students’ learning through
programme design and partnership arrangements?
How will you measure success in subject knowledge and
understanding?
(5 minutes discussion)
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