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Leadership
 Communicating the Vision
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State Staff
Program Managers
Teachers and Tutors
Students
Partner Organizations
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What’s in a name?
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Family Literacy
Workplace Education
English for Speakers of Other Languages
Adult Secondary Education
GED Preparation
English Literacy/Civics
 What do we call our employment
preparation component?
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What if….
 What if you had an adult education
component called…
or maybe
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Think about…
 What message would that send to
 Adult
learners?
 Instructors and program managers?
 Your state staff in providing support?
 Your partner organizations and
agencies?
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What would a Pathway look like?
 Sequential steps—certifications—throughout
the ABE/GED curriculum
 Applied reading, math, English instruction
 Soft Skills
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Work ethics
Problem solving
Critical thinking
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England’s Adult Ed
 Word Power and Number Power
Certificates
 Level
A Certificates
 Level B Certificates
 Matched to Specific Jobs
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 WorkKeys Certificates
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Gold
Silver
Bronze
5s and above
4s and above
3s and above
 Applied Mathematics, Reading for
Information, and Locating Information
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Today’s Session
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Today’s Session
 Introduce a sample career pathways framework to
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begin the discussion
Introduce the quality elements of a DRAFT career
pathways system from NCEE
Provide a series of sample state-level decision points
based on the quality elements
Learn about the process Ohio followed in responding
to some of the decision points
Give you an opportunity to discuss the implications of
some of the decision points in your state
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Small groups based on program size
Report will be developed from your responses.
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Tomorrow
 Expand upon the Quality Elements
 Integrated training and certificate programs
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Work readiness certificates
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College transition strategies
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Strategies for involving partnering agencies
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An alternative pathway to high school completion
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Closing session: The Power of the Unified Message
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A Sample Pathway Framework
 For the purposes of discussion, let’s just
imagine what one pathway framework might
look like…
Adapted from
Ohio’s
Pathway for
Adult Learners
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HIRE EXPECTATIONS
A Sample Integrated Pathway for Adult Learners
 The main ingredients
 A system of stackable certificates
 Progressive levels of skill
 From basic skills through postsecondary
 Integrated
 Lower Level: Applied reading, math, English with soft
skills, problem solving, critical thinking—aligned with
high-demand jobs in the community
 Upper Level: Combining adult education with skill
training in high-demand occupations
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Not necessarily linear
 Dual enrollment
A picture is worth a thousand words!
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Pg. 60
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Adult Education Certificates
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Purpose of the Framework
 Serve as a starting point to begin discussions
 Provide a base framework to create a common
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language
Lots of great things going on in the states
NAEPDC will build a clearinghouse of your effective
pathway practices
Following NTI – online survey
Fortunately, we now have some good guidance to
help us!
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Adult Education For Work Report
 Developed by National Center on Education
and the Economy—IN DRAFT—completion
date Spring 2009.
 Provides specific steps for implementing a
career pathway system that moves low-skilled
adults through workforce-oriented adult
education programs on to postsecondary
programs
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Adult Education For Work
 Not suggesting work readiness and
preparation for postsecondary become the
only purpose of Adult Education
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Recognizes important role for family literacy,
citizenship training, etc.
Creates a Work Preparation focus within the
Adult Education umbrella
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Adult Education For Work
Pg. 61
 Quality Elements for Seven Components
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Program Design
Curriculum and Instruction
Assessment and Credentialing
High Quality Teaching
Support and Follow-Up Services
Connections to the Business Community
Monitoring and Accountability Systems
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Quality Elements & Decision Points
 Side-by-Side
 We’ve added sample State-Level Decision
Points that relate to the Quality Elements.
 Example:
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QE: Work with community partners in a
community-wide career pathways learning
system to clearly define the role of Adult
Education for Work programs in the broader
system.
DP: Who are the key state partners you need to
involve in the planning process? How do you do
that?
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One State’s Model
Ohio’s New Path for
Adult Learners
Denise Pottmeyer
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The Ohio Model for Career
Pathways
Pg. 64
National Training Institute
November, 2008
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Quality Elements and
Decision Points
 In the process of working through the
decision points
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Some we have addressed.
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I’ll share with you what we have learned.
Some we have not.
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I’ll tell you what we hope to learn.
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Quality Elements and
Decision Points
 Elements and decision points I’ll discuss
today
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Program Design
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Who are the key partners that you need to
involve? How do you do that?
Do you want to develop different levels of
certificates?
Will you offer specialized career pathways to
accelerate pathways through the system?
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Quality Elements and
Decision Points
 Elements and decision points I’ll discuss
today
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Curriculum and Instruction
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Who can develop contextualized curriculum for
your selected career pathways and make sure
that curriculum and instruction focuses on work
and help adults learn by doing?
Support and Follow-Up
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How can you develop a counseling component?
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Quality Elements and
Decision Points
 Elements and decision points I’ll discuss
today
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High Quality Teaching
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Who will develop and deliver specialized
professional development for career pathways?
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Program Design
Who are the key partners that you need to
involve?
How do you do that?
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Expanding ABLE’s Role
To achieve common goals,
partnerships should be
developed with:
Postsecondary institutions
Other ABLE programs
Business/Industry
Corrections
Other agencies
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Background
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Background
Amended Sub. House Bill 119
►
Craft a strategy for the successful transition
of certain adult workforce development programs from
the Ohio Department of Education to the Ohio Board of
Regents.
►
Complete the transfer of responsibilities
by January 1, 2009.
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University System of Ohio
Key Partners in New System
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Key Strategy for Change
Increase adults’ access to postsecondary
education and training
Better align Ohio’s educational assets
with industry needs
Promote articulation and transfer among
educational institutions
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Ohio Skills Bank
Education Consortium
(University System of Ohio)
connects
Business and Industry Consortium
(Regional Economic Development
Directors)
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Ohio Skills Bank
Conduct business sector analyses
resulting in
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Career pathway development
Regional partnerships
Establish Stackable Certificates through
the University System of Ohio
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Program Design
Do you want to develop different levels of
certificates?
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Stackable Certificates
 Give adult learners an accessible pathway
to college-level degrees and improved employment
opportunities
 Separate from, but connected to traditional
education programs
 Allow adults to see a transparent path to learning and
skill development with an “open door” and drop-in
and drop-out opportunities.
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Stackable Certificates
 Offer adults a series of small steps with defined
rewards that build confidence for both students and
employers
 Promote student transfer and learning flexibility
 Recognize that adults can be at different levels in
mathematics, reading, writing and language
 Offer ESL at all pre-college levels
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A New
Path for
Adult
Learners
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Pre-College
Certificates
Language
& Literacy
Mathematics
Writing
Reading
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Certificate Competencies
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Competencies for the
Basic and Advanced Skills
 Certificates were
developed by committees
from postsecondary and
ABLE – aligned to College
Readiness Expectations
ESOL – Oral Communications
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Program Design
Will you offer specialized
career pathways to
accelerate pathways
through the system?
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• Health Care
ABLE and
Technical
Education
• Information Technology
• Advanced Manufacturing
• Others as defined
by regions
Technical education programs designed
in collaboration with local employers and
available through adult education providers,
leading to employment in a broad range
of fields.
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ABLE and Technical
Certificates
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College- and
Work-Ready
Certificates
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Regionally-specific
Regionally-specific
Ohio Statewide
Ohio Statewide
Medical Assistant
Automotive
Information Tech
Nursing
College-Level
Certificates
University
Two-Year College
Adult Career Technical
Program
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Career- Technical College Transfer
Information
Technology
Fire Fighter
Practical
Nursing
Electrical
Engineering
Technology
Mechanical
Engineering
Technology
Law Enforcement
Medical Assisting
Automotive
Technology
Emergency
Medical
Technician
Culinary Arts/
Restaurant Management
First Responder
Medical Records/
Health Information
Management
Construction
Management
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Our Piloting Process
What we hope to find out
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Curriculum and Instruction
Who can develop contextualized curriculum
for your selected career pathways?
Support and Follow-up
Services
How can you develop a counseling
component?
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High Quality Teaching
Who will develop and deliver
specialized professional
development for career pathways?
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ABLE Moves Forward
All ABLE programs need to
intensify efforts to help
students become aware of
and prepare for further
education and training options
by implementing the
Ohio ABLE Transition
Framework
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Ohio ABLE Transitions Framework
Implement the Ohio ABLE
Transitions Framework
Instructional
Components
+
Support
Services
Components
+ Partnerships
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Ohio ABLE Transitions Framework
Instructional Components
Provide more rigor in math,
reading and writing instruction
Contextualize curriculum around
careers
Incorporate postsecondary
program features into ABLE
classes
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Ohio ABLE Transitions Framework
Support Services
Component
Awareness
Advising/Counseling
Comprehensive
support services
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Ohio ABLE Transitions Framework
Partnerships
Postsecondary institutions
Other ABLE programs
Business/Industry
Corrections
Other agencies
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Ohio’s Piloting Process
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Twelve pilots – one in each of 12 Economic
Development Regions
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Determine professional development needs
Begin efforts to align educational systems, policies and
practices
Initiate conversations with representatives of the state’s
business and labor communities
Conduct an inventory of student aid and institutional
financing “best practices” in Ohio and across the nation
Develop models and/or products to increase number of
students achieving certificates and entering higher
education and training
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WIA AEFLA Incentive Grant—
How
Each ABLE program will do a
needs assessment to determine
program needs in
implementing the ABLE
Transitions Framework
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WIA AEFLA Incentive Grant—
How
 Results will be analyzed by
The Ohio State University
ABLE Evaluation and Design
Project.
 ABLE Collaboratives will meet
during the Fall Directors’
meeting to discuss the results.
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WIA AEFLA Incentive Grant—
How
Each collaborative will
create a plan(s) to develop
processes and/or products
related to the Ohio ABLE
Transitions Framework
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WIA AEFLA Incentive Grant—
What
Examples of products and processes that
may be developed—
ABLE curricula contextualized or customized to
particular occupations or technical certificates
Implementation of a model to increase career and
academic advising services to students who are
transitioning to postsecondary education and to the
workplace
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Supports for ABLE
Regional Resource Centers and State ABLE
Consultants will support and convene Collaboratives.
The Ohio Literacy Resource Center will serve as
repository for developed products and processes.
OSU Evaluation and Design Project will support
assessment alignment, evaluation of Collaboratives
and Stackable Certificates.
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What do you think?
 Break-out groups
 Based on state size/budgets
 Discuss the implications of the Program
Design and High Quality Teaching
elements in your state
 Recorder/presenter from each group
 We will compile responses in a report after
the NTI.
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The Task
 For each element in the Program Design,
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What would you need if you decided to
implement this element into your Adult
Education system?
 For the professional development element:
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What would you need to prepare all teachers
to add a Pathway component to her/his
classroom?
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Large States – 1A
 Facilitator: Linda Warner
 Washington (divide between the two groups)
 Ohio
 Indiana
 Massachusetts
 Illinois
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Large States – 1B
 Facilitator: Joanie Rethlake
 Washington (divide between the two groups)
 California
 Michigan
 Minnesota
 Texas
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Medium States – 1A
 Facilitator: Karen Liersch
 Arizona
 Iowa
 Maine
 Missouri
 Tennessee
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Medium States – 1B
 Facilitator: Reecie Stagnolia
 Arkansas
 Georgia
 Kentucky
 Maryland
 South Carolina
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Small States – 1A
 Facilitator: Pam Etre-Perez
 American Samoa
 Colorado
 Mississippi
 New Mexico
 Oklahoma
 Utah
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Small States – 1B
 Facilitator: Johan Uvin
 Guam
 Nevada
 New Hampshire
 Northern Mariana Islands
 Rhode Island
 Vermont
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