Update on the 2010 Census
This Year and Next
Oregon State Data Center Meeting
Portland State University
April 14, 2009
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2010 Census Strategy
Count everyone,
count them once, and
count them in the right place.
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Census History
1790 – The first census
1850 – Counting individuals
1920 – No reapportionment
1940 – First use of sampling
1970 – Mailout / mailback
2000 – Increased response rates
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Why a Census?
• The Constitution requires a census every
10 years to determine the number of
representatives to Congress for each
state based on the population.
$3,000,000,000,000+
• In the next decade, over $3 trillion in
federal funding will be allocated to tribal,
state and local governments using census
data.
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Ensuring the Confidentiality
of Your Information
• By law, the Census Bureau does not share
personal information with ANYONE
• Not even with other federal or law
enforcement agencies
• The Census Bureau strips all
identifying information and
publishes only summary data
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Seven Topics on the
2010 Census Form
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Name
Age
Gender
Race
• Ethnicity
• Relationship
• Rent/own house
Takes an average household ten minutes to complete
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Update on the Census in Oregon
• Address Canvassing
– Checking all addresses in the field
– Capturing GPS coordinates
– Schedule
• Portland Local Census Office (LCO)
– April 6 through June 19, 2009
• Eugene Local Census Office (LCO)
– April 20 through July 3, 2009
• Recruiting / staffing
– 2100 people will be hired for 2009
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What’s Next?
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Address List Development • Language Assistance
Questionnaire Delivery
• Recruiting Efforts
Mail Back Phase
• Communications Campaign
• Paid advertising
Enumeration
• Transitory locations
• Partnerships
• Group Quarters
• Census in Schools
• Households
• Earned media
• Public relations
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Address List Development
2008 Local Update of Census Addresses
2009 Address Canvassing (Spring / Summer)
2009 Group Quarters Validation (October 2009)
2010 Update/Leave (March 1 – April 2, 2010)
700,000 applicants are needed in
2009 for Address Canvassing
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Questionnaire Delivery
• Questionnaires delivered or mailed to all
housing units in March 2010
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March 8-10
March 15-17
March 22-24
APRIL 1
April 1-10
Advance Letter
Questionnaires Mailed
Reminder Postcard
CENSUS DAY
Replacement Questionnaire
• Bilingual questionnaires (Spanish /
English) delivered or mailed in tracts
with more than 40% Spanish-speaking
households - - 15 million housing units
in 44 states
• We expect a 64% mail response
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Group Quarters Enumeration
• Group Quarters Validation (October 2009)
• Group Quarters Advance Visit (February – March 2010)
•
Service-Based Enumeration (March 29 – 31, 2010)
– Targeted Non-Shelter Outdoor Locations
– Shelters
– Soup Kitchens
– Regularly Scheduled Mobile Food Vans
• Military Group Quarters Enumeration (April – May 2010)
• Group Quarters Enumeration (April – May 2010)
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Transitory Locations Enumeration
• Locations include RV parks, campgrounds,
hotels, motels, marinas, racetracks, circuses,
and carnivals
• Designed for people who do not have a
“Usual Home Elsewhere” at time of census
operations
• Transitory locations are identified through
Address Canvassing and local knowledge
• March 22 to April 16, 2010
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Household Enumeration
• Nonresponse Followup (NRFU)
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Most costly component of the census
Enumerators visit close to 47 million addresses
Multiple attempts made with households
700,000 field staff hired locally in 2010
Multilingual enumerators
Late April through June 2010
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Language Assistance Program
• Targeted mailing of bilingual Spanish/English
questionnaire
• Questionnaires display both English and Spanish
Telephone Questionnaire Assistance (TQA)
telephone numbers
• Bilingual TQA operators available in the 5 primary
non-English languages
• Language Assistance Guides available online in 59
languages and through Telephone Questionnaire
Assistance and Questionnaire Assistance Centers
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Language Assistance Program (continued)
• Language identification flashcards to be provided to
all enumerators and Questionnaire Assistance
Center Representatives
• Be Counted forms available in 6 primary languages:
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English
Spanish
Chinese (Simplified)
Korean
Vietnamese
Russian
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Language Flash Cards
• Provided to enumerators and
QAC Representatives during
enumeration phase
• Assists Census worker with
identification of respondent’s
language
• Bilingual enumerator or
translator is then used to
conduct interview
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Language Assistance Guides (59)
Albanian
Amharic
Arabic
Armenian
Bengali
Bulgarian
Burmese
Cambodian
Cebuano
Chamorro
Chinese (simplified)
Chinese (traditional)
Chuukese
Croatian
Czech
Dari
Dinka
Dutch
Farsi
French
German
Greek
Gujarati
Haitian Creole
Hebrew
Hindi
Hmong
Hungarian
Ilocano
Italian
Japanese
Korean
Laotian
Lithuanian
Malayalam
Marshallese
Navajo
Nepali
Panjabi
Polish
Portuguese
Romanian
Russian
Samoan
Serbian
Somali
Spanish
Swahili
Tagalog
Tamil
Telugu
Thai
Tigrinya
Tongan
Turkish
Ukrainian
Urdu
Vietnamese
Yiddish
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Recruitment Efforts
• Approximately 3.8 million applicants needed
• Two major recruitment drives
– Address Canvassing - December 2008 to April 2009
- - 700,000 applicants needed
– Nonresponse Followup - October 2009 to April 2010
- - 3,100,000 applicants needed
• Toll-free jobs line launched nationwide
• Recruiting Web site
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Recruitment Efforts (continued)
• Recruitment advertising
• Local recruiting and testing
• Multilingual applicants needed
• Hiring waivers
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Challenges in Achieving
an Accurate Count
• Charged political environment
• Hyper-charged immigration debate
• Growing diversity in the Nation’s population
• Measuring up to the “Best Census Ever” in
2000
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2010 Census
Communications Campaign:
It’s In Our Hands
• Paid advertising
• Earned media
• Public relations
• Census in Schools
• Partnerships
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Paid Advertising
• Paid advertising in 14 languages
• Ads to be on radio, television, Out of Home
(OOH), newspapers, magazines, and
interactive as well as nontraditional media in
places such as barbershops
• Ads to be tested with intended audiences
• Ads scheduled to run from January through
April 2010
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Hard to Count (HTC) Populations
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• Public assistance
recipients
• Poverty
• Low education
• High
unemployment
Renters
Crowded housing
Immigrants
Non-English
speakers
• Female-headed
households
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Partnership Methods
• Complete Count Committees
• Specialized outreach to HTC populations
• Language support
• Faith-based outreach
• Census in Schools implementation
• Be Counted and Questionnaire Assistance Centers
• Targeted special events
• Media buzz
• 680 Partnership staff
– January 2009 through June 2010
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Partnership Tools
• 2010 Census public Web site
• Partnership toolkits
• Promotional materials - - electronic and print
• Customizable materials
• Promotional giveaway items
• 2010 Census Planning Database
• Complete Count Committee training materials
• Partner Support Program
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Complete Count Committees
• Volunteer committees
established by local or
tribal governments
• Urge community
participation in census
Local
Media
Community
organizations
Neighborhood
Associations
CCC
• Conduct targeted outreach
• Give true expression to
“It’s in Our Hands”
campaign theme
Government
Agencies
Churches
Businesses
Schools
Census 2000 = 11,800 Complete Count Committees
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Questionnaire Assistance Center
(QAC) and Be Counted (BC) Sites
Questionnaire Assistance
Centers are locations
where individuals receive
help completing their
questionnaire
March 19 – April 19, 2010
Paid Questionnaire Assistance
Center Representatives
Be Counted sites are
locations where people go
to get a blank
questionnaire if they feel
they were missed
30,000 Questionnaire
Assistance Centers
40,000 Be Counted sites
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What Your Community Can Do
to Get the Best Count
• Form a local Complete Count Committee
• Analyze 2010 Census Planning Database and develop
strategic mobilization plan
• Convene a 2010 Census Community Kick-off with trusted
leaders
• Create venue for Mayor’s participation as Census
advocate
• Motivate high-level trusted community leaders to support
Census
• Urge local residents to apply for Census jobs
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What Your Community Can Do
to Get the Best Count (continued)
• Educate residents about importance of being counted
• Identify Be Counted / Questionnaire Assistance Center sites
• Publicize Census through community-level communication
networks
• Publicize Census at community festivals, parades, and
special events
• Use all local resources to mobilize your residents to be
counted
• Create your own 2010 Census promotional materials
• Engage local media to promote Census participation
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Questions to Contemplate
• Who are the hardest to count in our community?
• How can we use existing communication channels in
our community to increase mail response?
• What strategies can we implement to reach the
hardest to count populations in our community?
• Where can the best local spokespersons we recruit
advocate for full census participation?
• When should we mobilize our local campaign?
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Supporting the 2010 Census
is like writing a check
to your community
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Thank you!
Seattle Regional Census Center
19820 North Creek Parkway
Bothell, WA 98011
Linda Clark
Information Services Specialist
[email protected]
(425) 908-3062
Gladys Romero
Partnership Specialist
[email protected]
(206) 478-2449
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Update on the 2010 Census This Year and Next