Providence Neighborhood
Market Analysis
Phase One Findings
ICIC
City Advisory Practice
1
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Project Sponsors:
Rhode Island Economic Policy Council
Urban Ventures
Rhode Island Housing & Mortgage Finance
Corporation
2
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Table of Contents
I. Project Overview and Timeline
II. Demographic and Economic Profile
III. Metal Manufacturing
IV. Education & Knowledge Creation
3
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Providence Neighborhood Market Analysis
Project Objectives
• Provide useful analytics for identifying marketbased opportunities in select Providence
neighborhoods
• Identify potential links between neighborhood
markets and regional/city cluster strategies
• Collaboratively determine strategic direction
4
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Providence Neighborhood Market Analysis
Scope of Work
Scope of work includes
Scope of work does not includes
•
Cluster Profiles
•
Site-specific real estate analysis
•
Neighborhood Asset Mapping
•
Business Surveys
•
Strategic expert interviews
•
Strategy development
•
Value Chain Analysis
(2 clusters)
•
Implementation
Inform strategic direction for economic revitalization in
and near low-income neighborhoods that benefit local
residents and businesses
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
5
Project Timeline
Oct.
Nov.
Dec..
Jan.
Feb.
= Working
Group Meeting
November
December
February
•
Introduction to ICIC & project
• City cluster profile
• Value chain analysis
•
Study area definition
•
Demographic and business
base analysis
• Detailed cluster analysis for
top 10 clusters
– Education &
Knowledge Creation
• Initial neighborhood
business segmentation
– Metal Manufacturing
•
Discussion of ongoing efforts
• Discussion of strategy
going forward
6
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Table of Contents
I. Project Overview and Timeline
II. Demographic and Economic Profile
III. Metal Manufacturing
IV. Education & Knowledge Creation
7
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
The Providence
Neighborhood Market
Analysis
Study Area will include
the following
neighborhoods:
NO RT H PRO V IDE N CE
PAW T U CK ET
02 90 4
W a ns k uc k
C h a rl es
Hope
B la c k s to n e
02 90 8
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Downcity
The Jewelry District
West End
Upper South
Providence
Lower South
Providence
Elmwood
Resevoir
South Elmwood
Washington Park
M o un t P lea s a n t
M o un t H o pe
M a nt o n
S m it h H il l
C o lle g e H ill
V a lle y
02 90 9
F e d e ra l H ill
Fo x P o in t
O l ne y v il le
S ilv e r L a k e
W a y la n d
D o wn to w n
JOH N S TO N
H a rt fo rd
02 90 6
E lm h u rs t
EAS T P RO V I DEN C E
02 90 3
W est End
U p p er S o u th P ro v id e nc e
Lo w er S o u th
02 90 7
P ro v ide n c e
E l m w oo d
R e s e rv o i r
T o w n B o u n d a r ie s
W a s h in g to n P a rk
S o u th E l m w oo d
N e ig b o rh o o d B o u n d a r ie s
02 90 5
0290 3
0290 4
0290 5
0290 6
0290 7
0290 8
0290 9
CR AN S TO N
Study Area
8
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
The Study Area Lags Behind the City and the Regional Economy in
a Number of Dimensions1
Population by Race
Poverty
100%
Study Area
21%
80%
O th e r
City
19%
Prov. MSA
14%
A s ia n
60%
H is p a n ic
40%
W h ite
B la c k
Boston MSA
20%
12%
0%
S tu d y
Educational Attainment
C ity
A re a
P ro v .
B o s to n
M SA
M SA
100%
80%
Graduate Degree
60%
College Degree
40%
Some College
Median Household Income
Study Area
City
$39K
$41K
20%
High School
Less than High
School
Prov. MSA
Boston MSA
$50K
$62K
B
os
t
on
v.
M
SA
M
SA
i ty
C
Pr
o
St
u
dy
A
re
a
0%
(1) The Providence MSA includes Bristol, Kent, Providence, and Washington counties in Rhode Island.
Notes: MHI estimated based on weighted average of census tracts’ MHI. Poverty estimated as percentage of households with less than $15K income. Educational attainment
accounts for people above the age of 25.
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Source: Spatial Insights, 2001
9
Providence Business Base
Profile
Employment Share
Providence
Metro Area1
City of
Providence
Study
Area
Central
Business District
Establishments
Share of MSA (%)
Share of City(%)
28,883
5,618
2,627
1,613
19%
9%
46%
5%
28%
Employment2 (K)
Share of MSA (%)
Share of City (%)
408
111
63
36
27%
15%
52%
10%
36%
Est. revenues ($B)
113
Share of MSA (%)
Share of City (%)
34
30%
26
23
23%
20%
75%
68%
Study Area
(46% of City)
City of
Providence
(27%)
MSA Remainder
(75%)
The study area in Providence represents 46% of the City’s and 13% of the
region’s employment
Notes: (1) The Providence MSA includes Bristol, Kent, Providence, and Washington counties in Rhode Island.
Sources: 2000 State Unemployment Compensation data (ES202); 2000 Dun & Bradstreet; ICIC analysis
10
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
The Region*1 is Growing in Almost Every Cluster
Growth: MSA Employment CAGR*2 (95-00)
11%
9%
Local Retail
Local Housing & Household Goods
7%
5%
3%
Education &
Knowledge Creation
Business Services
Local Health Services
Hospitality & Tourism
Local Construction &
Development
Local Personal
Transport
Metal Mfg
Local
Commercial
Services
1%
7%
12%
17%
-1% Communications
Equipment
-3%
22%
Info 27%
Technology
32%
37%
42%
47%
Financial Services
Medical Devices
Distribution Services
Local Hospitality
Analytical Instruments
10,000
EMP
Publishing & Printing
Local Ent & Media
-5%
Local Food & Beverage Processing
Jewelry & Precious Metals
-7%
Share: City Jobs / MSA Jobs (2000)
Traded
Clusters
(*1) The Providence Region includes four Rhode Island Counties: Bristol, Kent, Providence and Washington
(*2) CAGR -- Compounded Annual Growth Rate
Note(s): The Local Community and Civic Organizations Cluster is not included in this picture. Publishing and Printing is included in this picture due to its relation to Creative hub not because the employment is in the top 15
Source: Cluster Mapping Project, Institute for Competitiveness and Strategy; 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); ICIC analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
11
City Employment CAGR*2 (95-00)
15%
Local
Local
Hospitality
Retail
10%
Hospitality & Tourism
Local Food & Beverage Processing
5%
Local Construction & Devt
Local Housing &
Household Goods
Local
Commercial
Services
Local Health Services
Medical Devices
0%
0
1
Local Personal
Transport
Distribution
Services
-5%
Info
Technology
-10%
Communications
Equipment
-15%
10
Local Ent
& Media
100
Education &
Knowledge Creation
Jewelry &
Precious Metals
Business Services
Financial Services
10,000
EMP
Metal Mfg
Publishing & Printing
Analytical Instruments
City Location Quotient*3
(*1) Traded Clusters are clusters that produce goods and services locally and distribute them across the nation or globe. Conversely local clusters produce goods and
services which are needed by the local population.
(*2) CAGR -- Compounded Annual Growth Rate
(*3) Location Quotients are measures of hoe the cluster employment concentration compares with the employment concentration nationwide
Note(s): The Local Community and Civic Organizations Cluster is not included in this picture. Publishing and Printing is included in this picture due to its relation to Creative
hub not because the employment is in the top 15
Source: Cluster Mapping Project, Institute for Competitiveness and Strategy; 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); ICIC analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Traded
Clusters
12
In Many Traded Clusters, Where Wages
Are On Average Higher, Providence is Losing Jobs
While the Region is Gaining
11%
9%
Local Housing & Household Goods
7%
Local Personal Transport
MSA Emp CAGR* (95-00)
Education & Knowledge Creation
Local Construction & Development
Local Health
Hospitality & Tourism
Services
5%
Metal Mfg
Business Services
Publishing & Printing
Financial Services
-12%
Local
Hospitality
3%
Local Ent & Media
1%
Info Technology
-7%
Communications
Equipment
Local Commercial
Services
-2%
Analytical Instruments
Local Utilities
Local Retail
3%
-1%
8%
Local Food & Beverage Processing
25%
Distribution
Services
-3%
Jewelry & Precious Metals
-5%
Medical
Devices
Traded
Clusters
10,000
EMP
-7%
City Emp CAGR* (95-00)
(*) CAGR -- Compounded Annual Growth Rate
Note(s): The Local Community and Civic Organizations Cluster is not included in this picture. Publishing and Printing is included in this picture due to
its relation to Creative hub not because the employment is in the top 15
Source: Cluster Mapping Project, Institute for Competitiveness and Strategy; 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program
(ES202); ICIC analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
13
There are Opportunities to Strengthen Clusters Where
Providence is Losing Jobs While the Region is Gaining
2000 City
Employment (K)
Cluster
City Employment
CAGR ‘95-’00
MSA
Employment
CAGR ‘95-’00
Average
City Share
City Business
of MSA Cluster
Size
Employment (%) (Employees)
1. LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES
22880
1.4%
2.2%
36%
45
2. Education and Knowledge Creation
10827
-0.6%
2.6%
47%
45
3. LOCAL COMMERCIAL SERVICES
9799
2.1%
1.7%
40%
25
4. Jewelry and Precious Metals
6394
-5.2%
-4.6%
40%
19
5. LOCAL HOSPITALITY ESTABLISHMENTS6159
7.3%
2.7%
22%
16
6. Financial Services
5464
-9.0%
0.7%
35%
18
7. Business Services
4668
-8.4%
2.5%
29%
11
8. Hospitality and Tourism
3004
5.6%
2.9%
36%
28
9. LOCAL FOOD AND BEVERAGE PROCESSING
2928 AND4.6%
DISTRIBUTION
0.4%
17%
17
10.
Medical Devices
2850
1.6%
1.3%
32%
32
2651
-2.9%
1.9%
20%
11
17. LOCAL RETAIL CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES
2176
23.3%
2.2%
18%
16
21. Metal Manufacturing
-7.6%
2.2%
14%
13
11. LOCAL ENTERTAINMENT AND MEDIA
1798
Source: Cluster Mapping Project, Competitiveness Institute; 1995, 2000 Rhode Island Labor Market Information; 1995, 2000 National Covered Employment and Wages Program (ES202); ICIC Analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
14
Bringing Cluster Strategy to the Neighborhood Level
Builds on the Business Base in the Neighborhoods
Assessing the competitiveness of these companies and their links to regional
clusters helps shape strategy. The Neighborhood Business Inventory
Matrix, a comprehensive database of all enterprises operating in the
neighborhood, is a valuable tool for this analysis.
Industry
Competitiveness
Neighborhood Business Inventory Matrix
Ideal quadrant for a
Company: High Industry
Company Competitiveness and High
X
Operational Efficiency
1
1
Operational Efficiency
Size of bubble reflects
an equally weighted
composite of sales,
employment and wages
of the firm relative to
other firms in the
neighborhood.
Operational Efficiency =
Industry Competitiveness =
•
•
Industry MSA Employment CAGR/
MSA Employment CAGR
IC measures whether the industry’s
area employment is growing faster or
slower than the area’s employment in
general.
•
Company Sales Per Employee/
National Industry Sales Per Employee
•
A ratio greater than one indicates that
the company is more efficient than its
industry average
15
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Major Anchors in the South Elmwood Neighborhood
10
Size of bubble reflects an equally
weighted composite of sales,
employment and wages of the
firm relative to other firms in the
neighborhood.
8
6
SAFE-HOME SECURITY
SONG JEWELRY INC
SYSTEMS
Industry Competitiveness
4
R I BUREAU INVESTIGATION
ANCONA BUILDERS INC
AIR CLEANING CONCEPTS
INC
TSANG & TSANG
INSURANCE SVC
MCM JEWELRY CORP
2
E L FIELDING ELECTRIC INC
SHELLY JEWELRY
S K JEWELRY
0
0
-2
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
EDGAR MODELIERS INC
ACCU-CARE SUPPLY INC
RECYCLING FOR RI
EDUCATION
VILMAIN & KLINGER INC
-4
RENCLIF INC
XIONG EMPLOYMENT
AGENCY
-6
-8
Operational Efficiency
Source: American Business Info Data, Federal ES 202 Data (1995, 2000), Bureau of Labor Statistics Data (1995, 2000), ICIC Analysis
Note: In order to accurately represent the private sector business base, many public sector and non-profit businesses were not included in this analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
16
Major Anchors in the West End Neighborhood
8
Size of bubble reflects an equally
weighted composite of sales,
employment and wages of the
firm relative to other firms in the
neighborhood.
6
ALLIED BUSINESS
DOCUMENTS
SAFE-WAY ELECTRIC
MOTOR CO
4
Industry Competitiveness
ALLTEK LIMITED
PIEZO SWITCH
DEVELOPMENT INC
JOHN F ALLEN & SON INC
2
J & R Corp
MILTON FABRICS
WILLIAM M JETTE & SON
-1000
JOSEF CREATIONS INC
0
FULFORD
0 FINDINGS
TWO HANDS INC
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
INTERNATIONAL ETCHING
INC
-2
PILGRIM SCREW CORP
GEORGE GREER CO
SAGE MANUFACTURING CO
VIRGINIA & SPANISH
PEANUT CO
-4
SALVADORE TOOL &
FINDINGS INC
Metal
Manufacturing
-6
Operational Efficiency
Source: American Business Info Data, Federal ES 202 Data (1995, 2000), Bureau of Labor Statistics Data (1995, 2000), ICIC Analysis
Note: In order to accurately represent the private sector business base, many public sector and non-profit businesses were not included in this analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
17
The Working Group Chose Two Clusters with the
Potential to Broaden the City’s Economic Development
ICIC Cluster Selection Criteria
Economic Performance
Which clusters are the major
economic engines of the region
and of the inner city?
Which clusters offer
the most opportunity
for inner-city
business development
and growth?
Metal Manufacturing: Retain a
small but critical job base
• Strong presence in study area
• Relatively low barrier to entry
Which clusters have future growth
potential
• Related to the jewelry and precious metals
cluster that has dominated Providence
historically
Which clusters provide broad
economic impact?
• Competitive wages and accessible jobs
Inner City Opportunity
Which clusters derive competitive
advantages or disadvantages
from their location?
Which clusters offer job
opportunities and
foster career paths with desirable
wages?
Which hold potential for
entrepreneurship
and business formation?
Education: Build on one of the
city’s greatest strengths
• Dominant cluster in terms of employment
• Strong links to commercial services cluster
• Not a strong presence in the study area,
but significant impact and potential impact
through business and workforce
development
• Related to “creative economy” that is a key
component of Providence
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
18
Goals of Cluster Value Chain Analysis
• Understand the cluster’s core industries, customers and
competitive challenges
• Quantify cluster presence in study area, city, and region
• Understand the relationships and trends within the cluster
both locally and nationally
• Identify links and gaps to regional economy
AND
• Tap into the thinking, aspirations and concerns of
Providence business owners
This information will inform neighborhood and regional
strategy development
19
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Table of Contents
I. Project Overview and Timeline
II. Demographic and Economic Profile
III. Metal Manufacturing
IV. Education & Knowledge Creation
20
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Metal Manufacturing Overview
63 study area companies employ
7% of the region’s 12,800 metal manufacturing workers
Providence
Study Area
2000 Establishments
2000 Employment
Employment CAGR (1995-2000)
Average Business Size (Emp.)
City of
Providence
Providence
MSA
63
140
524
917
1798
12,806
-3.8%
15
-7.6%
13
2.2%
24
89% of Providence Metal Manufacturers Have Less Than 50 Employees
Source: 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202)
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
21
Upper South Providence
Company
#of Emp
PN Patrick
5-9
Aluminum & Copper
5-9
RN Durrell
1-4
John Olson
1-4
Providence Elctroplating 1-4
Regal Plating
50-99
Ideal Plating
10-19
Frank’s Plating
5-9
E&S Tool
1-4
Star Enameling
1-4
McGough&Kilguss
5-9
Poly-tech Diamond
10-19
Metal Manufacturing Companies Are
Spread Throughout the Study Area and
City
Downtown
Company
# of Emp
Valley Brass
1-5
Lower South Providence
Company
# of Emp
Improved L.
100-249
NAB Metal
5-9
RE Sturdy
5-9
Scott’s Plating
1-4
Atlantic Co.
10-19
West End
Company
# of Emp
Pilgrim Screw
20-49
LM Hovey
10-19
Kraemer Findings 10-19
Surface Coatings
10-19
Richard’s Polishing 10-19
Austin hard
10-19
Spencer Plating
10-19
International Etching 20-49
Cut-Rite Steel
10-19
BDY Hun&Die
1-4
RayDaigle
1-4
Peacock Tool
1-4
#
### ##
#
#
#
# # #
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
##
###
# #
#
#
### # ##
#
##
#
Industry
Reservoir
Company
Quality S&S
AFG Enterprises
J & M Spra
# of Emp
50-99
50-99
1-4
Elmwood
Company
# of Emp
Mario Glueing 1-4
Source: 2001 ABI; ICIC Interviews
Metal Coating & Engraving
Non-Automotive Metal Stamping
Screw Machine Products
Metal & Die Castings
Plating & Polishing
Wire & Related Products
Rolling & Heat Treating
Display Cases, Safes & Vaults
Metal Working Equipment
Furnaces, Mills & Refineries
Providence
Study Area
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Washington Park
Company
# of Emp
Carroll Coatings
1-4
Refining One
20-49
Soluble Metals
10-19
Metal Solutions
20-49
RI Heat Treating
5-9
Moody Machine
10-19
Wellington Mftg
5-9
Narragansett Screw 10-19
Technodic
10-19
Monarch M.Finishing 20-49
National Plating
10-19
Rib Co. Ind.
50-99
Fewrguson Wire 100-249
Hanscom
20-49
Frank Morrow
1-4
Anjil International
1-4
AZ Tool
1-4
Oar Moldworks
20-49
Applitek Tech
10-19
22
Providence Companies Represent a Range of Industries in the Cluster
Cluster Core*
Inputs/Suppliers*
Furnaces, Mills
and Refineries
•Gilmore-Kramer
•Armbrust Intrnl
Customers
Metal & Die
Castings
•Fielding Mnfg
•Stevells Casting
Non-Automotive
Metal Stamping
•Kraemer Findings
•Ira Green Inc.
Rolling and Heat
Treating
•Frys Metals
•Mutual Metals
Medical
Instruments
Machine Tool,Dies,
and Fixtures
•Meckandil Tool
•Precision Industries
Metal Coating &
Engraving
•AFG Enterprise
•JMT Epoxy
Screw Machine
Products
•Pilgrim Screw
•Wellington Mnfg
Plating &
Polishing
•Victory Finishing
•Monarch Metal
Supporting Industries*
Display Cases,
Safes & Vaults
•Frank Morrow Co
•The Elliot Group
RIMES
RIEDC
Slater Center
Agility Alliance
Training
• Manufacturers’
Partnership
• CCRI
• Davies Vo-Tech
(*) The company lists for each industry are not exhaustive.
Telecommunications
Aerospace and
Defense
Specialized Institutions
•
•
•
•
Jewelry, Silverware
and Plateware
Electronics
Wire and Related
Products
•Hansome Inc
•Mahr Federal
Technical Assistance/
Incubation
Plastics
Trade Orgs /
Industry Networks
• Rhode Island Export
Assistance Center
• RIMA
• Mnfg Jewelers and
Suppliers of America
• Nat’l Tooling & Machining
Ass.
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Critical Support Cluster
Transportation &
Logistics
23
Metal and Jewelry Manufacturing are Related But
Distinct in Providence
• Providence’s historical dominance of the jewelry industry has
influenced the type of metal manufacturing now present there
– Many precision manufacturers
– Plating and polishing is the most prominent industry
• Most jewelry manufacturers have diversified into fields such as
electronics and telecommunications
• Some metal manufacturing companies that do not primarily focus on
jewelry still maintain jewelry manufacturing as some component of
their business
24
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Rapid Job Loss Threatens Providence’s Historic
Position in Key Industries
Wire & Related Products 5
City CAGR*1 (95-00)
1%
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
1000
27 Metal working Machinery & Equipment
8
Non-Automotive Metal Stamping
-4%
83
34
Jewelry Manufacturing
Plating & Polishing
-9%
5
Metal & Die Casting
Display Cases, Safes & Vaults
Rolling & Heat Treating
3 Furnaces, Mills & Refineries
12
23
5
-14%
Metal Coating & Engraving
6
Screw Machine Products
MSA Emp CAGR >3%
200
EMP
Size of employment
-19%
City Location Quotient*2 (2000)
#
Number of Establishments
(*1) CAGR -- Compounded Annual Growth Rate
(*2) Location Quotient -- Location Quotients are measures of hoe the cluster employment concentration compares with the employment concentration nationwide
Source: Cluster Mapping Project, Institute for Competitiveness and Strategy; 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); 2000 National Covered Employment & Wages Program
(ES202); ICIC analysis
Note: 1% of Providence employment in Metal Manufacturing is not captured in this graph0
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
25
Employment CAGR ‘95 - ‘00
In These Key Industries, Providence is Losing Job
Share Relative to the Region and the Nation
0.2
589
0.15
358
0.1
51
0.05
72
7
0
-0.05
34
146
4194
1013
5739
225
-19K
9414
726
-1019
-4428
-50
-26
-21
-284
-85
-616
-79
-98
Screw Machine
Products
Wire & Related
Products
MSA
Nat'l
-102
-318
Furnaces, Mills
& Refineries
-74
City
-34
-0.2
-944
-144 -229
-0.1
-0.15
21K
9086
Non-Automotive
Metal Stamping
Rolling & Heat
Treating
Metalworking
Machinery
Metal Coating
& Engraving
Plating &
Polishing
Metal & Die
Casting
Source: 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); 1995 and 2000 National
Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); ICIC analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Jewelry
Manufacturing
Display Cases,
Safes & Vaults
26
21
Providence is Losing Jobs in Industries Where the Wage
Rate is Up to Four Times Greater than Minimum Wage
Plating and Polishing
Industry
Industry Share of City Cluster
Emp 00 (Rank*)
Total City Industry
Jobs 2000
625
Total Change Industry
Jobs 95-00
-229
Industry Avg Wage CAGR
95-00
5.5%
Industry
Occupation
35%(1)
Wage ($/H)
•
Patternmaker; Metal
•
Heating/Annealing/Tempering Machine Operators $11.27
•
Welders & Cutters
•
Painting, Coating & Decorating Workers, Hand
$8.23
•
Grinding & Polishing Workers, Hand
$9.61
•
Electrolytic Plating & Coating Machine Operators $11.56
$16.96
$12.86
Non-Automotive Stamping
Industry Share of City Cluster
Emp 00 (Rank*)
Occupation
11%(3)
Total City Industry
Jobs 2000
206
Total Change Industry
Jobs 95-00
-27
Industry Avg Wage CAGR
95-00
Wage ($/H)
•
Metallurgists/ical, Ceramic & Materials Engineers
$23.05
•
Machine Tool Cutting Operators, Metal
$16.22
•
Machine Forming Setters, Operators, Metal
$11.97
•
Punching Machine Setters, Operators, Metal
$11.49
•
Metal Molding, Coremaking & Casting Machine Setters
$11.41
2.2%
*Rank of Highest Employment out of the eight Metal Manufacturing Cluster Industries
Source: 1997, 2000 Bureau of Labor Statistics
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
27
Metal Manufacturing Performance is Affected by
Economic Context, Firm Competitiveness, and
Business Environment
FIRM
COMPETITIVENESS
ECONOMIC
CONTEXT
• Many Providence companies are
diversifying, moving, or going
under.
• Geographical diversification
• Many Providence manufacturers
have not adopted sophisticated
technologies and practices.
• Industrial diversification
• Jewelry-related manufacturers are
left with antiquated equipment.
• September 11 exaggerated the
effects of an already declining
economy.
• Many firms are expanding
markets to compensate for market
share lost to overseas competition
• The jewelry industry, once a major
customer of Providence metal
manufacturers, has shrunk by 65%
• Development of new
customers
• The region is experiencing growth in
metal stamping, metalworking
machinery, and display cases.
• Development of new product
line
• Collaboration between firms has
increased as a result of the
economic downturn
BUSINESS
ENVIRONMENT
• A significant number of
manufacturers have left Providence
• Some have moved out of
Rhode Island to escape high
taxes and energy costs
• Some have moved out of
Providence because of
expansion challenges in the
city
• While finding workers is less of a
challenge than it was during the
economic boom, skilled workers
are still in short supply.
• Potential to tap immigrant
workforce.
• The vocational system in
Providence needs improvement.
28
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
ECONOMIC CONTEXT
Metal Manufacturers are Hard-Hit by Economic Downturn
Nationally, manufacturing profits have
seriously declined since October 2000
89% of Providence metal manufacturers
are small or micro, making them
particularly vulnerable to recession.
Manufacturer’s After-Tax Profits
2%
90
Billions of dollars
80
9%
70
38%
60
50
51%
40
30
20
4Q 2001 not yet available
10
Micro (1-4)
Medium (50-249)
Small (4-49)
Large (>249)
0
1st Qtr
1997
2nd Qtr
1998
3rd Qtr
1999
Sources: National Association for Manufacturers
4th Qtr
2000
2001
“In 2001, we switched into short-term
planning -- managing for survival.”
- Providence metal manufacturer
Sources: US Census Bureau; 2002 Dun & Bradstreet; ICIC interviews
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
29
Uncertain Prospects in Major Markets
Make Long Term Planning a Challenge
Growth Prospects
ECONOMIC CONTEXT
In Their Own Words...
TELECOM
Fair
“Telecommunications is where we see
opportunity for future growth”
ELECTRONICS
Fair
“Computers and semi-conductors look like
they’ll start to recover toward the end of the
first and second quarter 2002”
Uncertain
“Outlook for aerospace is good in the long
term, but slow now.”
“The shrinking defense industry is tough to
break into as a new supplier”
AEROSPACE AND
DEFENSE
MEDICAL
DEVICES AND
EQUIPMENT
AUTOMOTIVE
EQUIPMENT
JEWELRY
Fair to Good
“An aging population and increased lifetime
expectancy bodes well for demand”*
“The industry is still adjusting to the managed
care system.”*
Fair
“The amount of electronics in cars increases
each year”
“The auto industry has not gotten hit as hard
because they’ve avoided over-inventory.
They learned that lesson.”
Low
“Companies that aren’t diversifying away
from Jewelry are going out of business”
“The domestic jewelry market has shrunk 50
to 60 percent in the past 10 to 15 years.”
*Quotes from industry research
Source: US Business Reporter; Plunkett Research; Hoovers Online, ICIC interviews
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
30
FIRM COMPETITIVENESS
Lean Manufacturing and Other Cutting-edge Practices Are
Critical to Maintaining Competitiveness
“Some Providence manufacturers are vulnerable to the efficiency of their
competitors.”
- Providence Manufacturing Expert
Lean manufacturing is an approach that eliminates waste by reducing costs in the
overall production process, in operations within that process, and in the
utilization of production labor.
•
•
•
•
Improves labor utilization
Decreases inventories
Reduces manufacturing cycle times
Increases capacity without additional capital expenditure
Manufacturers implementing lean manufacturing have achieved impressive
results:
• Improves direct labor utilization by 10% or more
• Improves indirect labor utilization by up to 50%
• Reduces inventories by 50% or more
• Decreases manufacturing cycle times by 70% or more
• Increases current facility capacity by 50% or more
Most lean conversions pay for themselves within six months.
There are 8 Providence Metal Manufacturers ISO-9000 Certified
Source: 2000 Manufacturing Engineering
31
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
City and State Taxes Were Cited by Most Companies as a
Competitive Disadvantage
“We are tremendously disadvantaged compared to companies in other states.”
“Property taxes in the city are a real problem.”
-- Providence manufacturers
Taxes/Regs. Threatening City
Competitiveness
•
Providence property taxes are sited as a burden by
many manufacturers.
•
•
Providence has the highest motor vehicle
tax rate of any city in Rhode Island impacting manufacturers with truck fleets.
Differing tax rates and schedules can be
difficult for companies with multiple sites.
Taxes/Regs. Threatening State
Competitiveness
•
The combined State and local tax burden on
electric utilities in Rhode Island is estimated to be
approximately three times the State and local tax
burden on such utilities in Massachusetts
•
Rhode Island’s corporate tax apportionment
structure can discourage companies to locate in,
stay in, and/or expand in Rhode Island.
•
While wholesale and retail inventory taxes are
being phased out over 10 years, they remain a
burden.
•
Rhode Island’s limited health care market drives up
the cost of health care.
•
Unlike Massachusetts, Rhode Island has no
centralized property tax administration
Source: Rhode Island Public Expenditure Council, ICIC interviews
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
32
A Range of Services Are Available to
Providence Manufacturers
Rhode Island Manufacturers
Extension Services (RIMES)
• Business strategies
• Technology adoption
• Lean manufacturing
• ISO/Quality systems
• Marketing & sales
Rhode Island
Manufacturers
Association (RIMA)
Legislative
Representation
CCRI
• Customized company
training
• Incumbent worker training
Training
Manufacturers’
Partnership
• Reduced-rate training for
members
TA
Metal
Manufacturers
Incubation
Slater Center for Design &
Innovation
• Supports cycle of design
and enterprise
Agility Alliance of New
England
• Alliances & Partnerships
BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
Government
Relations
International Trade
Assistance
Rhode Island Economic
Development
Corporation
• Retention
• Expansion
Rhode Island Export
Assistance Center
•Market Entry
•Strategies Export
Logistics
Source: ICIC interviews and research
33
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Opportunities Exist to Strengthen the Metal
Manufacturing Cluster
Strengthening the City
Relative to Region
• Ensure that metal
manufacturers are
utilizing existing technical
assistance
• Ensure that existing
specialized institutions
have an inner-city
strategy
• Take advantage of the
collaborative environment
that has resulted from the
economic downturn to
increase firm
competitiveness
Strengthening the City
Relative to the Nation
• Pursue a competitive tax
and regulatory
environment
• Focus on niche of
precision operations and
machine shops
• Advocate equipment
updates and technology
adoption
Strengthening the City
Relative to the World
• Focus on high-end or
specialized operations to
avoid competing with labor
costs
• US has the most developed
Telecommunications
market.
Telecommunications and
high tech are a Northeast
specialty and many
manufacturers are
diversifying into this field
• Better link training for job
opportunities in the future
34
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
CASE STUDY
FIRM COMPETITIVENESS
Bridgeport, CT’s Metal Manufacturing Cluster
Was Not Performing Up to National Standards
Despite national growth in metal manufacturing, Bridgeport’s metal
manufacturing cluster remained stagnant from 94-99
Threat
Bridgeport will lose an essential part of its economic base if
metal manufacturers do not adapt to the new market
Opportunity
Potential to retain existing companies and jobs and build
on this strong manufacturing base.
KEY CHALLENGE:
How can Bridgeport’s metal manufacturers become more
competitive and share in national growth?
35
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
CASE STUDY
FIRM COMPETITIVENESS
Bridgeport Formed the Metal Manufacturing Education &
Training Association to Increase Firm Competitiveness
META
Marketing
Purchasing
Joint Business
Opportunities
Utilities
Shared Marketing
Costs
Workforce
Development
Lean
Manufacturing
Cluster-Specific Skills
Training
Expert-Led
Workshops
Cutting Supplies
Job Placement
Shared Learning
Waste
Apprenticeships
Technology/
Automation
Benefits & Insurance
Transportation
Providence has existing service providers in some of these areas
Manufacturer’s
Partnership
RIMES
CCRI
36
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
CASE STUDY
Boston’s “Back Streets”
Initiative is a Potential Model
Back Streets are Boston’s manufacturing, support, wholesale, construction, and
processing businesses
–
They complement yet stand in contrast to “Main Streets” retail businesses,
as Back Streets businesses are often unknown and undervalued
Back Streets are integral to the life flow of the City and help form the City’s economic
backbone
–
Over 4,000 businesses
–
Over 100,000 jobs
Category
Manufacturing
Wholesale
Commercial Services
Logistics
Building and
Contractors
Food Processing and
Importing
Description
• Metal/chemical/high tech
• Printing and publishing
• Distribution of goods
• Receiving and reselling
• Srvcs. for other businesses
• Data/security/maintenance
• Moving/transportation
• Warehousing/storage
• General contracting
• Subcontractors
• Fish/meat processing
• Production
Examples
• Zoom Telephonics
• Spire
• Winston Flowers
• Slade Gorton & Company
• Jet-A-Way
• New World Security
• Casey & Hayes
• Boston Freight Company
• Suffolk Construction
• City Lights & Electrical
• Aqua-Nor Marketing, Inc.
• Dutch Maid Bakery
37
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
CASE STUDY
Four Objectives Drive the Back Streets Program
Mission: To retain and grow Boston’s viable industrial and commercial
businesses and their diverse job base through the strategic use of land,
workforce and financial resources
Support the Growth of Boston’s
Back Streets Businesses
Land & Space: “No net loss of
industrial space”
Make Boston an Attractive Business
Location
Navigation & Access: “A better
place to do business”
Develop and Support the Back Streets
Workforce
Bring New Resources to Boston’s Back
Streets
Workforce: “More high-pay, career
building jobs”
Capital & Partnerships: “Invest in
Boston”
38
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Key Discussion Points
• There is debate as to whether to pursue a metal manufacturing
strategy, given the cluster’s size and declining performance.
• Many of the supported services manufacturers need are offered in
Providence. It remains unclear whether metal manufacturers are
aware of and taking advantage of these services.
• Increasing manufacturing productivity is on the State’s agenda.
Is there a need for a comprehensive strategy around metal
manufacturing that will benefit the neighborhoods?
39
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Further Research Needed
• Conduct deeper analysis of the relationship between
metal manufacturing and jewelry manufacturing
• Provide more detailed comparative tax research,
focusing specifically on metal manufacturers, in order to
develop policy recommendations
• Explore potential leadership for a cluster strategy
40
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Table of Contents
I. Project Overview and Timeline
II. Demographic and Economic Profile
IV. Metal Manufacturing
V. Education & Knowledge Creation
41
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Providence Education & Knowledge Creation (E&KC)
Cluster Overview
Colleges and universities account for 78 percent
of the cluster’s employment
City of
Providence
2000 Establishments
2000 Employment
2000*1 Revenues (M)
Employment CAGR (1995-2000)
Providence
MSA
240
969
10,827
22815
1,265*2
5,549*3
-1%
2.6%
(*1): 2000 Revenues were not available from Dunn & Bradstreet. 2002 Data was used instead
(*2): $772 million of Providence E&KC Revenues are from Colleges and Universities, representing 60% of the MSA’s revenues from Colleges and Universities
(*3): $4,2 billion (77%) of MSA E&KC Revenues come from establishments other than Colleges & Universities
Source: 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); 2002 Dun & Bradstreet
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
42
E&KC Includes a Range of Industries and Supporting Clusters
CLUSTER CORE
Arts &
Culture
Colleges &
Universities
Commercial
Art
Museums, Galleries, Zoos &
Botanical Gardens
Printing &
Publishing
Libraries &
Research
Organizations
IT Products &
Services
Scientific
Instruments
Software and Computer Products,
Computer and Info Services
SUPPORTING CLUSTERS WITH E&KC RELATED INDUSTRIES
Commercial
Services *
Business
Services
 Advertising
 Agents & Brokers
 Copyright Services
 Public Relations
 Lawyers
 Consultants
Construction
 Industrial Design
 Architects
Hospitality*
 Coffee shops
 Restaurants
 Bars
Entertainment
 Theater Companies
 Movie production &
Services
 Musicians
Retail*




Music Stores
Book Stores
Craft Stores
Novelty Shops
SPECIALIZED INSTITUTIONS
Industry
Organizations
Government
Agencies
 HELP
 RI Board of Governors
 RI Consortium for
 RI Office of Higher
Educators
Education
 Rhode Island Independent
Higher Education
Association
Slater
Centers
Unions
43
*Denotes Local Clusters. Local Clusters produce goods and services which are needed by the local population. Conversely, Traded Clusters are goods and services produced locally and distributed
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
across the nation or globe.
Opportunities in E&KC Cluster Go Beyond the
Educational Institutions
• 80% of employment in the E&KC cluster is in colleges and universities, whose growth
trajectory is fundamentally different than other clusters or industries.
• Growth in E&KC will come primarily from commercialization of intellectual property,
creating linkages with supporting industries in the cluster (IT, Arts and Culture), and
creating linkages with supporting clusters (Commercial Services, Construction,
Entertainment).
• Opportunities for neighborhood business growth lie primarily in the linkages with the
supporting industries and clusters.
• Providence has created some specialized institutions that foster greater innovation and
collaboration (i.e. Slater Institutes, HELP). An economic development agenda could be
enhanced by these institutions and others like them.
• All parts of the E&KC cluster are represented in Providence, at varying degrees of scale.
In some areas, such as IT, the city has lost jobs while the region has gained, suggesting
an opportunity for growth in the city.
Unlike other clusters, E&KC has a variety of positive spillover effects that go beyond
creating jobs and wealth -- from enhancing the business environment and culture of the city
and neighborhoods to creating human capital in the form of graduates. With a
comprehensive strategy, these spillover effects can provide wide benefits for the residents
of the neighborhoods and for the region as a whole.
44
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Museums, Galleries & Zoos
0.4
5
0.35
0.3
Commercial Art and
33
Graphic Design
Organizations
43 Libraries & Research
0.2
0.25
0.15
City CAGR*1 (95-00)
15
Public Relations
Services
0.1
Colleges &
Universities
0.05
8
0
0
1
10
100
-0.05
-0.1
22 Printing & Publishing -0.15
Schools & Educational Services
IT Products & Services
19
88
-0.2
7
Scientific Instruments
-0.25
-0.3
-0.35
-0.4
500
82%
EMP
Size of employment
City Location Quotient* (2000)
2
(*1) CAGR -- Compounded Annual Growth Rate
(*2) Location Quotient -- Location Quotients are measures of hoe the cluster employment concentration compares with the employment concentration nationwide
Source: Cluster Mapping Project, Institute for Competitiveness and Strategy; 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); 2000 National
Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); ICIC analysis
Note: 1% of Providence employment in Education % Knowledge Creation is not captured in this graph
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
# Number of Establishments
45
The City has Lost Share in Several E&KC Industries
Employment CAGR ‘95-’00
The MSA and especially the City are performing below the national average in these industries
168
0.4
0.3
159
0.2
0.1
84
69K
795* 239K
1086
143
21
18K
22K
8
724K
412
30K
24
140
939
70K
24K
-3
0
46K
-93
-45
-0.1
-160
-835
-0.2
-408
-0.3
Colleges &
Universities
Schools &
Educational
Services
Commercial
Art & Graphic
Design
Public
Relations
Services
Museums,
Galleries,
and Zoos
Libraries &
Research
Organizations
Printing &
Publishing
IT Products &
Services
City
* Number of jobs lost or gained.
Source: 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); 1995 and 2000
National Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); ICIC Analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Scientific
Instruments
MSA
Nat'l
46
IT, Libraries, and Research Organizations are the E&KC
Industries with the Greatest Representation Downtown
Clinical Studies Ltd.
Associated Press
Media Press Inc.
Log On America
URI Library
College Hill
URI - Downtown Campus
RIEDC Research Library
Smith Hill
RISD
City/State Computer Services
RISD Library
.-,
95
#
Amerzine
#
#
#
# ##
#
#
Federal Hill
#
Art With Mark
$#
$#
#
#
#
#
#
PC Troubleshooters
# #
#
# #
#
#
#
#
Roger Williams University
$
Museum of Art
Caster Communications
Wind River Systems
Black Fish Design
TM Morris Productions
Travmar Dest. Directory
Regan Communications
Medica Press Inc.
Johnson & Wales Library
.-,
195
#
#
Upper S. Providence
.-,
Providence Public Library
95
FH/GPC Fleischman Hilliard Co.
Quench Design Group
Johnson & Wales University
Diocesan Resource Center
Media City Providence
RI State Archives
RI Committee for Humanities
Source: 2001 ABI; ICIC Interviews
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Industry
Colleges & Universities
IT Products & Services
Public Relations Services
Commercial Art & Graphic Design
Libraries & Research Organizations
Printing & Publishing
Museums, Galleries & Zoos
47
Upper South Providence is Home to Many Commercial Art and
Graphic Design Firms
National Institute - Sports Science
Heritage Harbor Museum
Ocean State Bindery
Alexis Design
Uniform Digital Mapping
#
.-, 9 5
#
###
# ####
##
#
.-,
19 5
#
#
#
#
#
##
Online Enterprises
U.S.Prov.
Apeiron Foundation
#
#
Alexis Design
Design Plus
Elizabeth Trostli
Zu Design
Hotwire, Inc
Kendrick Design
Mad Creative
John Clark Studio
Matt Castiglielo Des.
Malcolm Grear Designers
NECR
Cornerstone Comm.
Malcolm Greer Dsnrs
Thndr&Ltng. Research
Gregory & Cooney
#
#
150 Chestnut Street
$
.-, 9 5
#
CCRI
Pvd Children’s Museum
Peters Health Sciences
Library
#
#
#
Printing Equip. Guide
L.S. .Prov.
ER Pickett Co.
#
#
Industry
Providence City Arts for Youth
Slocum Pantograph Engraving
S. Providence Library
Maxie Graphics
Source: 2001 ABI; ICIC Interviews
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Colleges & Universities
IT Products & Services
Public Relations Services
Commercial Art & Graphic Design
Libraries & Research Organizations
Printing & Publishing
Museums, Galleries & Zoos
48
Museums and Libraries & Research Organizations Have the
Strongest Presence in the Remaining Southside Neighborhoods
Information Design
#
West End
.-,
95
Lawrence and Brown
Dominican Communications
Washington Park Library
Clean Harbors
SRG Resources Inc.
Culinary Archives
NE Marine Supply
Lane Design
Bungo.com
Elmwood
Computer Solutions
International Gallery - Heritage
Fuente De Vida
International Institute of RI
Verichem Lab
#
#
#
##
#
.-,
95
#
## #
#
#
Reservoir
A to Zebra Gift Shop
Museum of Natural History
RI Zoological Society
Museum of Natural History Library
Bay Computer Association Inc
Wash Park
#
##
#
#
S. Elmwood
.-,
95
#
Industry
Scientific Instruments
IT Products & Services
Public Relations Services
Commercial Art & Graphic Design
Libraries & Research Organizations
Printing & Publishing
Museums, Galleries & Zoos
Source: 2001 ABI; ICIC Interviews
49
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
E&KC Represents a Range of Mid-High Wage Jobs as Well
as Entry-Level Positions (I)
Occupation
Industry
Industry Share of City
Cluster Emp 00
(Rank*)
Total City Jobs
2000
Total Change Jobs
95-00
Industry Avg Wage
CAGR 95-00
Colleges &
Universities
78%(1)
8450
796
2.9%
Wage ($/H)
•
Professional/Paraprofessional & Tech.
$21.01
•
Loan Officers & Counselors
$13.90
•
Computer Programmer Aides
$15.67
•
Librarians, Professional
$17.17
•
Residential Counselors
$12.37
•
Instructors, Non-vocational Education
$13.03
•
Instructors and Coaches, Sports and
Physical Training
$ 9.53
•
Technical Assistants, Library
$10.49
•
Audio-Visual Specialists
$17.33
•
Teacher Aides, Paraprofessional
$ 7.65
•
Switchboard Operators
$ 9.52
•
Mail Clerks, Except Mail Machine
Operators and Postal Service
$ 9.82
•
Clerical and Administrative Support Workers
$10.84
•
Cooks, Institution or Cafeteria
$11.34
Janitors and Cleaners
$ 9.16
•
Cleaning and Building Service Workers
$ 9.18
•
Shuttle Bus Drivers
$ 8.19
*Rank of Highest Employment out of the eight Education & Knowledge Creation Cluster Industries
Source: 1997, 2000 Bureau of Labor Statistics
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
50
E&KC Represents a Range of Mid-High Wage Jobs as Well
as Entry-Level Positions (II)
Industry
Printing & Publishing
Industry Share of City Cluster
Emp 00 (Rank*)
169
Total City Jobs 2000
-159
Total Change Jobs 95-00
Wage ($/H)
•
Platemakers
$13.22
•
Lithography & Photo
$16.05
•
Bookbinders
$10.77
•
Printing, Binding
& Related
$13.19
•
Letterpress Setters
$14.49
•
Cutting & Slicing
-4.2%
Industry Avg Wage CAGR
95-00
Industry
1.6%(5)
Occupation
IT Products & Services
Industry Share of City Cluster
Emp 00 (Rank*)
10%(2)
Total City Industry
Jobs 2000
1022
Total Change Industry
Jobs 95-00
-834
Industry Avg Wage CAGR
95-00
4.6%
Machine Setters
Occupation
$10.67
Wage ($/H)
•
Computer Engineers
$27.62
•
Computer Programmers
$26.24
•
Computer Programmer Aides
$16.89
•
Designers, Except Interior
$24.25
•
Mechanics/Install/Repair
$18.40
•
Photographic Processing Machine Operators
$11.17
•
Data Entry Keyers, Except Composing
$10.32
•
Data Keyers, Composing
$12.24
*Rank of Highest Employment out of the eight Education & Knowledge Creation Cluster Industries
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
51
Providence is Losing Jobs to the Region in IT
Products & Services
Most jobs have been lost in the computer services and
prepackaged software industries.
•
Between 1995 and 2000 Providence lost 973 jobs in these two industries
•
The number of establishments increased from 42 to 58
•
The average size of establishment decreased from 34 employees to 8
Types of companies in these industries
include:
– Computer Consultants
– Database Developers
– Data Processing Consultants
– Disk and Diskette services
– Computer software,
prepackaged
– Operating systems,
applications, prepackaged
– Games, prepackaged
Job loss could be due to:
Companies moving out of Providence
• Daly.commerce
b/w 50-100 jobs
Companies cutting jobs
• Y2K - After January 1, 2000 companies
no longer needed the consultants they
had used to be Y2K ready
Companies going out of business
• EBusiness Technologies (EBT)
b/w 150 -350 jobs
Source: 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program (ES202); Dunn & Bradstreet Historical Data; ICIC Analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
52
Providence Colleges & Universities Have an Opportunity to
Play an Even Greater Role in Economic Development
Some efforts have been made
around joint purchasing, but
Offering employment
the size disparity among the
opportunities for local
Purchaser
institutions makes this
residents
challenging.
Redirecting institutional
purchasing toward local
business
Employer
Colleges and universities have
a number of workforce training
efforts, but few have an innercity component.
Workforce
Developer
Partnering to
meet local and
regional
workforce
needs
Advisor/
Network Builder
Operating
Training
Investing
Tech. &
Commercializ
ation
Real Estate
Developer
Using university
real-estate
development to
anchor local
economic
growth
Channeling university
expertise to increase local
business capacity or
Incubator
improve
local business
There is an opportunity for
environment
Offering services to support
greater collaboration among
start-up companies and
colleges & universities.
expedite research
commercialization
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Major university
expansion plans
are underway in
the city and
region - creating
opportunities in
support clusters
such as
construction and
commercial
services.
Because of the diverse nature
of Providence’s colleges &
universities, research
commercialization
opportunities span a broad
range of industries.
53
OPERATING
Colleges and Universities Contribute to Local
Economy Through Purchasing
•
In 1998 Brown University spent $65.8 million in Rhode Island
representing 46 percent of total purchasing
•
RISD estimates 45-50 percent of purchasing is in Providence
•
Purchasing for CCRI, URI, and RIC is determined by state mandate
•
Some universities, such as CCRI, do commercial services in-house
while others outsource
Larger universities are not as open to joint purchasing, as the benefits
are skewed toward smaller colleges and universities.
Sources: Partners for the 21st Century: Brown University’s Economic Contributions to Providence and Rhode Island; ICIC interviews
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
54
Colleges and Universities Account for
Almost 10% of Nonresidential Land in
Providence
INVESTING
Major expansion plans
are underway in the
city and the region
•
60,000 square foot
RISD Center is planned
•
175,000 square foot
Life Sciences building
being built at Brown
•
J&W continuing to build
a downtown campus
with plans to build a
new student center
downtown
•
24,000 square foot
expansion planned for
CCRI’s Providence
campus
55
Source: Providence Plan
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
INVESTING
Johnson & Wales Has Had a Significant Impact on
Downtown and Waterfront Development
• Working in partnership with the City, J&W bought 100
acres of old shipyard property for "Harborside" campus
• J&W bought a brownfield site (former site of The Outlet
which had burnt down) and constructed a park and
dorms.
56
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Universities Contribute to the Providence Economy
Through Business Incubation and Research
Commercialization
Spin-offs reach many Providence
clusters and industries
Medical
Technology
Health
Services &
Research
Graphic &
Industrial
Design
Brown
J&W
Hospitalit
y&
Tourism
Formal incubation and VC efforts exist as well
•
BDC-RI. Brown joined with 14 RI financial
institutions and corporations to create a non-bank
lender that does subordinated debt lending.
•
Brown Venture Forum. Led by local business
representatives, the Brown Venture Forum promotes
the creation & expansion of high-growth businesses.
•
Slater Centers provide seed money and technical
assistance
RISD
URI
Environmental
& Marine
Science
College of
Business
Administration
TECHNOLOGY /
COMMERCIALIZATION
–
63 start-ups funded to date
•
RISD’s Center for Integrative Technologies provides
space for businesses started by RISD grads
•
RISD’s Center for Design and Business offers
technical assistance to design-oriented firms
•
Twelve firms in Rhode Island have started as a
direct result of Brown University research, mostly
related to medical technology
–
Cyberkinetics (Medical Devices)
–
Nemogen (Pharmaceuticals)
Sources: Partners for the 21st Century: Brown University’s Economic Contributions to Providence and Rhode Island; ICIC interviews
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
57
Providence Colleges Have a Number of
Training Services Available for Businesses
In s titu tio n
B u sin e s s A d viso ry S e rvic e s
N e tw o rk B u ild in g S e rvice s
B ro w n U n ive rs ity


B ro w n U n ive rs ity V e n tu re
F o ru m


U n ive rs ity o f R h o d e Is la n d
R h o d e Is la n d S c h o o l o f
D e s ig n


C e n te r fo r D e s ig n & B u sin e ss
P a rtn e rs h ip w ith
M a n u fa ctu rin g Je w e le rs a n d
S u p p lie rs o f A m e ric a
- co m p u te r-a id e d d e sig n
a n d m a n fg
te ch n o lo g y.
B r ya n t C o lle g e




C e n te r fo r D e s ig n & B u sin e ss
R I E xp o rt A ssista n c e C e n te r
SBDC
V e rizo n /B rya n t C o lle g e
T e le co m m u n ic a tio n s C e n te r
R o g e r W illia m s U n ive rs ity

G a b e lli S ch o o l o f B u sin e ss's
S m a ll B u sin e s s In stitu te
- stu d e n t co n su lta n ts
TRAINING
B ro w n E n g in e e rin g R e g io n a l
T e ch n ica l E xc h a n g e
B ro w n C o m p u te r S cie n ce
D e p t - In d u stria l P a rtn e rs h ip
P ro g ra m
R e se a rc h C e n te r in B u sin e ss
a n d E c o n o m ics
- D o e s n o t w o rk d ire c tly
w ith b u s in e ss e s
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
58
Providence has a number of workforce training
initiatives but few have an inner-city component
U n ive rs ity o r C o lle g e
B u s in e s s D rive n T ra in in g

CCRI

C u sto m ize d tra in in g fo r in d ivid u a l
co m p a n ie s
C o u rse s fo r th e R h o d e Isla n d P la stic
P a rtn e rsh ip C o u n cil (co lla b o ra tive
p u b lic-p riva te tra in in g e ffo rt fo r p la stics
co m p a n ie s)
R h o d e Is la n d C o lle g e

C e n te r fo r M a n a g e m e n t & T e ch n o lo g y
p ro vid e s o n site p ro g ra m s in a re a s like
m a n u fa ctu rin g p la n n in g a n d co n tro l
P ro v id e n c e C o lle g e

A n n u a l b u sin e ss fo ru m w ith T e xtro n to
im p ro ve m g m t o f a n in cre a sin g ly d ive rse
w o rkfo rce
URI

E xe cu tive M B A P ro g ra m
B rya n t

C e n te r fo r M a n a g e m e n t D e ve lo p m e n t
p ro vid e s tra in in g to b u sin e sse s, o rg s,
a n d g o v a g e n cie s.
TRAINING
W o rk fo rc e D rive n T ra in in g

T ra in in g o ccu rs th ro u g h w o rkstu d y.
R IS D

C o n tin u in g e d u ca tio n se rve s
7 ,5 0 0 p e r ye a r.
R o g e r W illia m s

P a rtn e rsh ip w ith Jo b L in k
L e a rn in g C e n te rs a n d th e
M a yo r to tra in e co n o m ica lly
d isa d va n ta g e d p e o p le
e n te rin g th e w o rkfo rce .
N e w E n g la n d In s titu te o f
T e c h n o lo g y

C e n te r fo r T e ch n o lo g y & In d u stry d e m a n d d rive n tra in in g
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
59
Opportunities Exist to Strengthen the Cluster and
Promote Inner-City Economic Development
Opportunities within Colleges & Universities
Opportunities in the Greater Community
Operating
• Increase opportunities for local suppliers to participate in
universities’ supply chains
• Assess outsourcing opportunities
Training
• Target inner city in workforce development and business
development efforts
Investing
• Use institutional expansion to stimulate further development
Technology & Commercialization
• Further support specialized institutions and their relationships
with colleges and universities
• Take advantage of institutional expertise to strengthen
related clusters
• Create greater
collaboration among
universities around
specific economic
development agendas
• Link expertise of
colleges and
universities to related
clusters
• Strengthen links with
related industries to
understand capacity in
Providence and needs
of colleges and
universities being met
elsewhere
60
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
CASE STUDY
Buy West Philadelphia
University of Pennsylvania
• Works with local community
organizations to identify
and access local
businesses
• Leverages relationships
with large national firms to
contractually require joint
ventures with local firms
• Incorporates local
purchasing goals into staff
performance evaluations
• Local spending increased
from $2.1 million to over
$55 million (or 8.5% of
Penn’s total spending)
between 1987 and 2000
• One local vendor’s sales to
Penn increased from
$250,000 to $1.7 million
through a joint venture with
a national vendor
61
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
CASE STUDY
Howard University
• Howard invested in revitalizing 45 university-owned buildings in the
economically distressed, crime-ridden LeDroit Park neighborhood
• The University invested $7 million into the project, leveraging an
additional $25 million from Fannie Mae, Verizon and others
• Created over 300 new housing units in an area that has since seen a
marked improvement in property values
• $65 million in new commercial development, including a new
bookstore, restaurants, 33,000 square feet of retail space and a
modern Emergency Trauma Center at Howard Hospital
• Owners of the remaining 130 properties in the neighborhood are
beginning to make investments
62
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
CASE STUDY
Workforce Developer:
Manufacturing Technology Bridge Program
• Chicago area manufacturers are facing a serious labor shortage.
Since 1997, Manufacturing Technology Bridge Program has
prepared Chicago’s inner-city workers to meet this shortage
• Program brings together unique expertise of each partner
• UIC provides labor market research, expertise in program design
and securing funding; Daley College offers specialized training;
Illinois Institute of Technology provides curriculum advice
University
of
Illinois at
Chicago
Insituto
del
Progres
o Latino
Richard
Daley
College
Chicago
Mfg
Center
Illinois
Institute
of Tech
Mayor’s
office
• Over 260 graduates
• An 80 percent placement rate, 72 percent were unemployed upon
entry into the program
• Median starting wage of $10.13 per hour compared with $8.12 per
hour upon entry into program
• 73 students placed in college courses
63
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
HELP and RI’s Four Slater Centers Illustrate a Collaborative
Approach With the Potential to Impact the City of Providence
and Strengthen the E&KC Cluster
Slater Centers
 Slater Centers focus on technology
commercialization
 Each center offers business development
resources to individuals and seed/start up
companies
Four Slater Centers
Slater Center for Biomedical Technology
Slater Center for Design and Manufacturing
Slater Center for Interactive Technologie
Slater Center for Marine and Environmental
Technologies
HELP
 Health and Education Leadership for
Providence (HELP) is a coalition headed by the
presidents of four private universities and six
voluntary hospitals.
 HELP focuses on advancing the health and
education of children in Providence.
HELP Members:
Brown University,
Rhode Island School of Design
Butler Hospital,
Johnson & Wales University
The Miriam Hospital
Roger Williams Medical Center
Providence College
Rhode Island Hospital
St. Joseph Hospital
Women & Infants Hospital
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
64
Key Discussion Points
• There is a need to encourage involvement from the Education &
Knowledge Creation cluster from both a “top down and bottom up”
approach.
• An organization similar to HELP, with an economic/community
development focus, could be identified or created to engage key
stakeholders in the E&KC cluster in development efforts.
• The South Side must be a part of these efforts
In order for these efforts to succeed & truly impact the inner
city there must be support from the Colleges and Universities
highest level of leadership.
65
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Further Research Needed
• Analysis of purchasing geography for Providence colleges and
universities
• Deeper analysis of non-college/university industries in Education &
Knowledge Creation cluster
• Analysis of the presence of supporting clusters in the study area
neighborhoods, and those companies’ links to colleges and
universities
• Further understand dynamics in the IT component of E&KC
• Explore potential leadership for a cluster strategy
66
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
APPENDIX
67
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
City Average Wage/Emp CAGR* (95-00)
Jewelry & Precious Metals
11%
Communications
Equipment
9%
Financial Services
Local Utilities
Medical Local Housing & Household Goods
Devices
7%
Metal Mfg
Business Services
Analytical
Instruments
Local Personal Transport
5%
Education &
Knowledge Creation
Info Technology
1%
-5%
Local Hospitality
Distribution
Services
3%
Publishing & Printing
-10%
Local
Commercial
Services
0%
-1%
Local Construction & Development
Local Health Services
Local Retail
Hospitality & Tourism
5%
10%
25%
Local Food & Beverage Processing
Local Ent & Media
-3%
-5%
10,000
EMP
-7%
City Employment CAGR* (95-00)
Traded
Clusters
(*) CAGR -- Compounded Annual Growth Rate
Note(s): The Local Community and Civic Organizations Cluster is not included in this picture. Publishing and Printing is included in this picture due to
its relation to Creative hub not because the employment is in the top 15
Source: Cluster Mapping Project, Institute for Competitiveness and Strategy; Rhode Island xxxx ES202 data; ICIC analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
68
City Share of MSA Employment in the Cluster (%)
50%
Education &
Knowledge Creation
45%
Jewelry &
Precious Metals
Local Commercial Services
40%
Local Health Service
Hospitality & Tourism
35%
Financial Services
Medical Devices
Business Services
Distribution Services
30%
10,000
EMP
Info Technology
25%
Local Housing ...
Publishing & Printing
20%
Local Retail
Analytical Instruments
Local Hospitality
Local Ent & Media
Traded
Clusters
Local Food & Bev Processing
15%
Local Personal
Transport
Metal Mfg
Local Construction & Development
Communications Equipment
10%
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
Cluster Share of Total City Employment (%)
Note(s): Local Utilities Cluster is not represented in this chart. However, 54 percent of the Local Utilities Cluster is in the City of Providence while it
comprises 2% of the City employment.
Source: Cluster Mapping Project, Institute for Competitiveness and Strategy; 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program
(ES202); ICIC analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
69
Local Retail
City Average Wage CAGR, 95-00
26%
21%
Hospitality & Tourism
Jewelry &
Precious Metals
16%
Local Hospitality
Distribution Services
Medical Devices
11%
Local Housing
Local Commercial
Services
6%
Local Food &
Bev Processing
1%
0
-4%
-9%
10,000
20,000
10,000
EMP
Local Health
Service
30,000
Local Construction & Development
Local Utilities
Education &
Knowledge Creation
40,000
50,000
60,000
70,000
Financial Services
Publishing & Printing
Local Personal Metal Mfg
Business Services
Transport
Communications
Local Ent & Media
Equipment
Analytical Instruments
Info Technology
Traded
Clusters
City Average Wage ($)
(*) CAGR -- Compounded Annual Growth Rate
Note(s): The Local Community and Civic Organizations Cluster is not included in this picture. Publishing and Printing is included in this picture due to
its relation to Creative hub not because the employment is in the top 15
Source: Cluster Mapping Project, Institute for Competitiveness and Strategy; 1995 and 2000 Rhode Island Covered Employment & Wages Program
(ES202); ICIC analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
70
Cluster Occupational Profile
Cluster
Types of Entry -Level Jobs Hourly Wage Wage Range
LOCAL F&B proccessing
$6.37-$11.17
Cashiers
Stock laborers
Bakers, Bread and Pastry
Butchers and Meat Cutters
6.37/hr
9.13/hr
11.17/hr
Local Hospitality
$3.98 - $8.76
Wait Staff
Food Preparation workers
Bartenders
Hosts and Hostesses
3.98/hr
6.86/hr
8.76/hr
6.79/hr
Local
Construction/Development
$9.97 - $17.72
Plumbing, heating, air-conditioning
Electrical workers
Carpentry workers
Highway and street construction
Helpers, Carpenters and Related Workers
Helpers, Electricians
16.65/hr
17.72/hr
14.64/hr
12.33/hr
10.11/hr
9.97/hr
Local Health Services
$7.86 - $18.28
Nurse Aids
Dental Assistants
Pharmacy Technicians and Aides
Laboratory Technicians
Security Guards
Food & Beverage Servers
Ambulance Drivers and Attendants
10.15/hr
10.15/hr
8.21/hr
18.28/hr
7.86/hr
11.34/hr
12.45/hr
Helpers, laborers, material movers
General office clerks
Truck Drivers
Freight and stock movers
Hand packers
10.52/hr
13.63/hr
16.96/hr
10.77/hr
8.71/hr1
Local Commercial Services
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, US Department
of Labor
Copyright
© 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
$8.71 - $16.96
71
Cluster Occupational Profile
Business Services
Data entry keyers
Computer operators
Employment interviewers (temp agencies)
Computer Programmer Aides
11.75/hr
12.23/hr
9.39/hr
14.12/hr
Education/ Knowledge Creation
Management support occupations
Technical Assistants, Library
Teacher Aides, Paraprofessional
Institution Cafeteria cooks
Grounds keepers
10.49/hr
7.65/hr
11.11/hr
Financial Services
Bank Tellers
Clerical Supervisors
Loan and Credit Clerks
Bill and Account Collectors
Statement Clerks
9.17/hr
Porters/Bellhops
Hotel Desk Clerks
Laundry Dry Cleaning Machine operators
Grounds Keepers
Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners
Food Service personel
Amusement and recreation attendants
Cooks Short Order and Fast Food
6.40/hr
8.89/hr
7.58/hr
7.53/hr
7.69/hr
10.83/hr
12.10/hr
Hospitality/Tourism
5.92/hr
6.40/hr
Jewelry/Precious Metals
Precision Hand Workers, Jewelry
9.17/hr
Precision Etchers and Engravers, Hand/Machine 10.79/hr
Jewelers and Silversmiths
10.79/hr
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, US Department of Labor
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
72
Business Cycles and Annual National Employment Change
in Ten Top Clusters
(1978-2000)
Local Health Services
Local Commercial Services
Education & Knowledge Creation
8%
8%
8%
4%
4%
4%
0%
0%
0%
- 4%
- 4%
- 4%
- 8%
- 8%
- 8%
- 12%
- 12%
- 12%
Jewelry & Precious Metals
Local Hospitality
Financial Services
8%
8%
8%
4%
4%
4%
0%
0%
0%
- 4%
- 4%
- 4%
- 8%
- 8%
- 8%
- 12%
- 12%
- 12%
Shaded areas cover periods of recession as defined
by the National Bureau of Economic Research
Source: National Bureau of Economic Research; Bureau of Labor Statistics, US Department of Labor; Cluster Mapping Project, The Competitiveness Institute at Harvard Business
School; ICIC analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
73
Business Cycles and Annual National Employment Change
in Ten Top Clusters
(1978-2000)
Local Food and Beverage
Processing
Business Services
Local Construction
8%
8%
8%
4%
4%
4%
0%
0%
0%
- 4%
- 4%
- 4%
- 8%
- 8%
- 8%
- 12%
- 12%
- 12%
Hospitality and Tourism
Metal Manufacturing
8%
8%
4%
4%
0%
0%
- 4%
- 4%
- 8%
- 8%
- 12%
- 12%
Shaded areas cover periods of recession as defined
by the National Bureau of Economic Research
Source: National Bureau of Economic Research; Bureau of Labor Statistics, US Department of Labor; Cluster Mapping Project, The Competitiveness Institute at Harvard Business
School; ICIC analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
74
Providence City Clusters:
Education & Knowledge Creation
Industry Employment
(2000)
Industry Employment Change*
(1995-2000)
1000
Colleges & Universities
Scientific
Instruments
Libraries and
Research
Organizations
500
Museums, Galleries,
& Zoos
0
IT Products and
Printing &
Services
Publishing
Libraries & Research
Organizations
Commercial Art &
Graphic Design
Museums, Galleries,
and Zoos
Public Relations
Services
Commercial Art &
Graphic Design
IT Products & Services
-500
Schools &
Educational Services
Colleges &
Universities
-1000
Scientific Instruments
Printing & Publishing
Total Employment:
10827
Net Change in Employment:
-354
Schools & Educational Services
-1500
*Note: Public Relation Services had a net change of +7 jobs from 1995-2000, too small to appear on the graph
Sources: Cluster Mapping Project, The Competitiveness Institute at Harvard Business School; 1995, 2000 US Bureau of Labor Statistics Covered Employment and
Wages Program; State of RI Labor Market InformationCopyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
75
Providence City Clusters:
Metal Manufacturing
Industry Employment
(2000)
Industry Employment Change
(1995-2000)
0
Display Cases,
Safes & Vaults
Wire & Related Products
Furnaces, Mills,
& Refineries Wire and Related
Products
Screw Machine
Products
-100
Plating & Polishing
-200
-300
Rolling and Heat
Treating
Screw Machine Products
Plating and
Polishing
-400
Non-automotive
Metal Stampings
Metal Coating and Engraving
-500
Rolling & Heat Treating
Metal Coating
and Engraving
-600
Metal & Die Casting
-700
Display Cases, Sages & Vaults
Metal and Die
Casting
Furnaces, Mills & Refineries
-800
Non-Automotive Metal Stamping
Metal Working Machinery & Equipment
Metal Working
Machinery &
Equipment
Total Employment:
1798
Net Change in Employment:
-868
-900
Sources: Cluster Mapping Project, The Competitiveness Institute at Harvard Business School; 1995, 2000 US Bureau of Labor Statistics Covered Employment and
Wages Program; State of RI Labor Market Information
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
76
Neighborhood: Downtown
Industry
Competitiveness/ Operational Efficiency Matrix
50
ERNST & YOUNG
Size of bubble reflects an equally
weighted composite of sales,
employment and wages of the
firm relative to other firms in the
neighborhood.
MANAGEMENT 2000
NAVIS PARTNERS
30
CAMP DRESSER & MC KEE
INNOVATIVE CLINICAL
INC
SOLUTIONS
Industry Attractiveness
NORDSTROM
CHESTNUT HILL REALTY
CORP
10
WESTIN
HOTEL
-1
0
1
2
-10
TILLINGHAST LICHT
PERKINS
ADLER POLLOCK &
SHEEHAN
-30
FIRST FINANCIAL CORP
CITY STATE
COMPUTER
SVC
3
4
5
6
7
8
Corporate Headquarters:
PROVIDENCE
WASHINGTON INS CO
Textron, Inc
Fleet Bank
Nortek
Prudential Securities
BROWN RUDNICK FREED &
GESMER
Citizens Bank
PARTRIDGE SNOW & HAHN
Edwards & Angell
HIGGINS CAVANAGH &
COONEY
Blue Cross Blue Shield of
Rhode Island Bancorp RI
Colleges / Universities and Other Non Profit:
Johnson & Wales Downtown Campus
-50
URI Feinstein College of Continuing Education
Roger Williams University
Providence Performing Arts Center
AFC CABLE SYSTEMS INC
-70
Rhode IslandHousing
Operational Efficiency
Source: American Business Info Data, Federal ES 202 Data (1995, 2000), Bureau of Labor Statistics Data (1995, 2000), ICIC Analysis
Note: In order to accurately represent theCopyright
private sector
many publicInner
sector
non-profit businesses were not included in this analysis
© 2002business
Initiativebase,
for a Competitive
Cityand
(www.icic.org).
77
Neighborhood: Upper South Providence
Industry Competitiveness/ Operational Efficiency Matrix
4
Size of bubble reflects an equally
weighted composite of sales,
employment and wages of the
firm relative to other firms in the
neighborhood.
3.5
CONSULTANTS ASSOC INC
Industry Competitiveness
3
UNIVERSITY
DERMATOLOGY INC
2.5
MERCHANTS OVERSEAS
INC
Colleges / Universities:
DON-LIN JEWELRY INC
Community College of Rhode
Island
WOMEN'S ONCOLOGY
2
R I CASTING CO INC
BAYSIDE ENDOSCOPY CTR
PROVIDENCE
ANESTHESIOLOGISTS
1.5
UNIVERSITY
ORTHOPEDICS
HASBRO CHILDREN'S
HOSPITAL
1
ALLEN BERRY HEALTH &
DENTAL
UNIVERSITY SURGICAL
ASSOC
SPRAGUE
LIFESPAN
0.5
HARVARD PILGRIM HEALTH
0 CARE
-2000
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
-0.5
COASTWAY CREDIT UNION
-1
Operational Efficiency
Source: American Business Info Data, Federal ES 202 Data (1995, 2000), Bureau of Labor Statistics Data (1995, 2000), ICIC Analysis
Note: In order to accurately represent the private sector business base, many public sector and non-profit businesses were not included in this analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
78
Neighborhood: Lower South Providence
Industry Competitiveness/ Operational Efficiency Matrix
10
Size of bubble reflects an equally
weighted composite of sales,
employment and wages of the
firm relative to other firms in the
neighborhood.
PROVIDENCE PUBLIC
WORKS DEPT
K B KELLY INC
8
JESMAC INC
6
Industry Competitiveness
CONTROLLER SERVICE & E W AUDET & SONS INC
SALES CO
4
HERFF JONES CO
MOTIVA ENTERPRISES INCWARREN EQUITIES INC
WHITE FUEL CO
2
BAY FUEL CO
0
-500
0
500
1000
I BROOMFIELD & SON INC
1500
2000
-2
IMPROVED LAMINATED
METALS CO
2500
3000
3500
4000
4500
5000
JAMES BRAY OIL CO
TOURTELLOT & CO INC
-4
PREMIUM POULTRY CO INC
FIELDING MANUFACTURING
WALCO ELECTRIC CO
-6
-8
Metal
Manufacturing
-10
Operational Efficiency
Source: American Business Info Data, Federal ES 202 Data (1995, 2000), Bureau of Labor Statistics Data (1995, 2000), ICIC Analysis
Note: In order to accurately represent the private sector business base, many public sector and non-profit businesses were not included in this analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
79
Neighborhood: Elmwood
Industry Competitiveness/ Operational Efficiency Matrix
4
ST JOSEPH HOSPITAL
3
PHOENIX-GRIFFIN GROUP II
LTD
Size of bubble reflects an equally
weighted composite of sales,
employment and wages of the
firm relative to other firms in the
neighborhood.
SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND
REHAB
KAY-KOOLA
PARTNERS IN OB & GYN
2
Industry Competitiveness
ST JOSEPH CTRPSYCHIATRIC SVC
CORPORATE CARE
ST JOSEPH HOSPITALSPECIALITY
1
HERB CHAMBERS
CADILLAC INC
0
-2000
FURNACE & DUCT SUPPLY
CO
COMPARE FOOD
SUPERMARKET
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
NARRAGANSETT ELECTRIC
EMPL CU
12000
14000
16000
18000
LATINO'S ALLCOM
MASTRO ELECTRIC
SUPPLY -1
CO
EMBARQUE BELLA VISTA
-2
NARRAGANSETT ELECTRIC
CO
-3
-4
NEW ENGLAND
INDUSTRIES INC
Operational Efficiency
Source: American Business Info Data, Federal ES 202 Data (1995, 2000), Bureau of Labor Statistics Data (1995, 2000), ICIC Analysis
Note: In order to accurately represent the private sector business base, many public sector and non-profit businesses were not included in this analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
80
Neighborhood: Washington Park
Industry Competitiveness/ Operational Efficiency Matrix
6
Size of bubble reflects an equally
weighted composite of sales,
employment and wages of the
firm relative to other firms in the
neighborhood.
IRA GREEN INC
4
NESCTC SECURITY
AGENCY
Industry Competitiveness
DIMEO
CONSTRUCTION CO
2
MAHR FEDERAL INC
GEORGE
MANN CO
NOVA MARKETING
c
0
-10000
0
10000
20000
30000
40000
50000
60000
ALLIED TELECOM INC
CORP BROTHERS INC
-2
DANECRAFT INC
ARMBRUST INTERNATIONAL
LTD
-4
-6
Operational Efficiency
Source: American Business Info Data, Federal ES 202 Data (1995, 2000), Bureau of Labor Statistics Data (1995, 2000), ICIC Analysis
Note: In order to accurately represent the private sector business base, many public sector and non-profit businesses were not included in this analysis
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
81
Key Points about Select Metal Manufacturing Markets (I)
• “Bundling” of services - offering several services for one price, such
as long distance, cable and internet access
• Highly competitive, particularly since Telecommunications act of
1996, regional companies collaborating to compete with Sprint and
AT&T to avoid infrastructure costs of establishing new territories
• Sale of wireless phones down since summer 2000
TELECOM
• Some experts expect industry-wide restructuring due to weak long
distance revenues, falling market share and reduced profits since
telecommunications act of 96 blew open competition
• Signs of economic downturn as early as 1999 when Overbuilt DSL
capacity estimated 4.7 million ports with only 3.5 million users
• Shift from analogue to digital as well as copper to fiber optic
transmission
• Fallout of circuit switch hardware as it was used to converts
conversations into digital and then from digital to analogue
• Desktop PC market considered saturated, semiconductor market
now considered a slow-growth model
ELECTRONICS
• Inventory congestion of all electronic component distribution
channels, indicating industry weakness
• inaccurate forecasting demand and monitoring of inventory levels
contributed to industry downturn• Increasing dependence on
electronics in the auto industry
• Trend is to invest 30% of revenue into future
Source: US Business Reporter; Plunkett Research; Hoovers Online
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
82
Key Points about Select Metal Manufacturing Markets (II)
• Industry trend had been severe cutbacks for military procurement
programs but outlook uncertain now that Bush has pledged increase
in military spending
• Commercial airline segment appears to be suffering substantially,
Airbus Industrie and Boeing are projecting cancellations up to 20 to
30 percent
• Used to be an American monopoly on world wide market but recent
acquisitions and mergers have increased foreign market share
(particularly the European Aeronautic Defense and Space Company
(EADS) merger)
AEROSPACE
AND DEFENSE
• Aircraft demand was already down 44 percent from 1998 to 1999 and
33 percent in 1999 to 2000. Expected to drop at least 25 percent in
2002. Boeing is cutting it’s commercial aircraft workforce by 30
percent.
• Prior to Sept. 11th China looked to be an emerging market but fragile
state of China’s economy and US-China foreign relations makes this
market high risk.
• Industry had been trending toward developing commercial markets
to decrease dependence on government contracts. Markets most
easily accessible are high-tech gear such as solid state electronics
Source: US Business Reporter; Hoovers Online
83
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Key Points about Select Metal Manufacturing Markets (III)
• Mergers and acquisitions prevalent in market as companies try to
reduce costs and enhance their market position
• Managed care changes play a major factor with industry sales and
earnings performance
MEDICAL
DEVICES AND
EQUIPMENT
• Baby boomer population continues to age and life expectancy is
increasing, both of which bode well for continued
usage/dependence on medical devices
• International sales have been growing despite slowdown in Asian
markets
• Auto-makers are consolidating their supply chain in order to cut
costs and increase productivity
• Growth in high tech parts as manufacturers seek to improve fuel
economy, reduce emissions and improve driver safety and
comfort, along with growth in memory and navigation systems
AUTOMOTIVE
EQUIPMENT
• Auto industry did not get hit as hard with inventory congestion due
to industry adjustments made in prior recessions
Source: US Business Reporter; Hoovers Online
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
84
Upper South Providence
Comp any
#of Emp
Comm . College R I
100-250
Project Riral
20-50
Printing Equip .
10-20
Ocean Sta te Bindery
10-20
Malco lm Grea r
10-20
Herita ge Harb or
10-20
Uniform Digital
10-20
Peters He alth Sci.
5-10
Pvd. Child Mu seum
5-10
Data D ev. Corp.
5-10
RI C omm for H umanities
5-10
Gregory&C ooney
5-10
Cornerstone C omm.
5-10
New Media Ad v.
1-5
Matt C astiglielo Des.
1-5
Zu Design
1-5
Hotw ire, Inc
1-5
Kendrick D esign
1-5
Mad C reative
1-5
Alexis Design
1-5
Design Plus
1-5
Elizabeth Trostli
1-5
John Clark Studio
1-5
South Pvd. Tutoria l
1-5
Th under&Lightning Rsrch 1-5
National Institute
1-5
Apeiron Foundation
1-5
Lower South Providence
Comp any
# of Emp
Goodwin Bradley
10-20
Henry A Avers
10-20
Pvd. CityArts
10-1 9
ER Pickett Co .
5-10
Slocum Panto graph
1-5
Maxie Graphics
1-5
South Pvd. Lib rary
1-5
Washingto n Park
Comp any
# of Emp
Clean Harbors
1 0-20
Culinary Archives
5-10
Dominican Comm.
1-4
lane Desig n
1-4
NE marine Su pply
1-4
Washingto n Park
1-4
Bungo.com
1 0-19
Lawrence & Brown
1-4
SRG Resources
1-4
Source: 2001 ABI; ICIC Interviews
E&KC Companies are Represented Throughout the
Study Area Neighborhoods
$
$
#
$# ## ## $
###
#
$###$#### #####
#
#
#
#
# ##
#
## ##
#
$
West End
Comp any
# of Emp
Info. D esign
1-5
#
#
##
#
#
Study Area
#
#
#
#
Providence
#
#
#
#
#
$
#
Reservoir
Comp any
# of Emp
Verichem Lab.
5 -9
Comp . So lutions
5-9
Industry
Colleges & Universities
IT Products & Services
Public Relations Services
Commercial Art & Graphic Design
Libraries & Research Organizations
Printing & Publishing
Schools & Educational Services
Scientific Instruments
Museums, Galleries & Zoos
Washingto n Park
Comp any
# of Emp
Clean Harbors
1 0-20
Culinary Archives
5-10
Dominican Comm.
1-4
lane Desig n
1-4
NE marine Su pply
1-4
Washingto n Park
1-4
Bungo.com
1 0-19
Lawrence & Brown
1-4
SRG Resources
1-4
Dow ntown
Comp any
# of Emp
Johnson&Wales
5000-10000
Hinckley, Allen&Snyde r
100-250
College-C ont. Ed.
50-100
Museum of Art
50-100
Clinical St udies Ltd.
20-50
RI School of Des. Libr.
1 0-19
Travmar
5-10
Mediacity Pvd .
5-10
Associated Press
5-10
Roger William s U.
5-10
RI State Archives
5-10
RI Econ. Dev. Corp.
5-10
Amerzine Co.
5-10
FH /GPC Fleischman
5-10
Caster Communications
5-10
Medica Press
1-5
Black Fish Design
1-5
LBC D esign
1-5
Quench Design Group
1-5
TM Morris Productions
1-5
Art w ith M ark
1-5
Wind River Systems
1-5
Providence Pu blic Library
1-5
College-C ont. Ed. Library
1-5
Diocesan resource Cntr .
1-5
Regan Communications
1-5
Duffy John T.
1-5
E-Source Inc
5-10
PC Troubleshooters Inc
5-10
Strate gic Solu tions Inc
5-10
Application Design Svcs In c 5-10
NECR
10-19
City/State Computer Svcs Inc 20-50
Intap LLC
5-10
Log On America Inc.
50-100
Online Enterprises Inc
1-4
World Affairs Council of R I
1-4
Daly Commerce
50-100
Fa nion McDon agh & Co
1-4
United Da ta Inc
1-4
46
85
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Librar ies & Re sear ch
Orga nizations
South Provide nce Lib rary
Washing to n Pa rk Li brary
Fuente De Vida
Provid ence Publ ic L ibrary
Rho de Isl and State Archi ves
RI Eco nomic Devel opmen t
Corp . Rese arch Libra ry
John son & Wale s Un iversity
Li brary
Col leg e – C ontinui ng Ed Libra ry
RI Sch ool of D esign L ibrary
Peters Heal th Scien ces L ibrary
Museu m Na tura l History L ibrary
Di ocesan Reso urce Center
Hi nkley Alle n & Snyde r
Natio nal Insti tu te of Sports
Scien ce
Bay Compu ter Associate Inc.
ER Pickett Co.
Apei ron Fo unda ti on
Uni fo rm Di gital Mapp ing
Cl ean Harb ors Envi ronmen tal
Data Deve lopme nt Co rp .
Cl inica l Studi es LTD
RI C ommittee For Human ities
Schools /Educ ational Ser vic es
South Provide nce Tu tori al Inc.
Proje ct Rira l
Thund er & Lig htning Re search
Mus eums, Galle rie s, & Zoos
Provid ence Chi ldren ’s Mu seum
Heri ta ge Harbo r Muse um
Cul ina ry Archive s & Museum
Museu m of Natural Hi story
Inte rnation al Ga llery- Heri tag e
Museu m of Art
Provid ence City Arts for Youth
A to Zebra Gi ft Shop
Rho de Isl and Zoolo gical Soci ety
Source: 2001 AB I; ICI C Int erviews
IT, Research Centers, and Commercial Art & Graphics
Have a Large Presence in the Study Area
Scientific Instrument
Verich em L abora tori es Inc
$
IT Products & Services
Wind Rive r Systems Inc.
Onlin e En te rp rises In c
World Affai rs Co uncil of RI
Dal ycommerce
Fanio n McD onag h & Co
Uni te d Data Inc
Law rence and Brow n
SRG R esources In c
Comp ute r Sol utions Inc
Inta p LLC
Log On America In c
Bung o.co m Inc
Ci ty/State Comp ute r Svcs Inc
E-Source Inc
PC Tro uble sh ooters Inc
Stra te gic Solutio ns Inc
Appl ication De sign Svcs Inc
NECR
$
Public Re la tions Ser vic es
Fresh & Fancy Foo ds
Gre gory & Co oney Inc.
Corn ersto ne Commun ication
Amerzine C o.
FH/GPC Fl eichman H illa rd Co.
Reg an Commun ications
#
$# ### ## $
##
#
$###$#### #####
#
#
#
#
#
##
### #
#
#
$
#
Commer cial Ar t/Graphic Des ign
MAXIE Gra phics
Info rmati on Desi gn
Malco lm Grear Desi gners Inc.
Matt Castig lieg o Design & ILLM
Zu D esign
Hotwi re Inc.
Kend rick D esign -Art Direction
Mad Crea ti ve
Alexi s De sign
Black Fi sh Desig n
LBC Desi gn
Quench De si gn Gro up
TM Morris Produ ctio ns Inc
Desi gn Plus
Eliza beth Trostli Illu stratio n
John C lark Stud io
Art With Ma rk
New Eng lan d Ma ri ne Supp ly
#
#
#
##
#
#
#
#
#
#
Providence
#
Study Area
Industry
#
#
$
#
Colleges & Univ ersitie s
Brown Un iversity
Commun ity Co lle ge -RI
John son & Wale s Un iversity
Provid ence Col lege
Rho de Isl and Co lleg e
Rho de Isl and Schoo l of De si gn
Rog er Wil lia ms Uni versity Col leg e-Contin uing Edu cation
Uni versity o f Rho de Isla nd
Colleges & Uni versit ies
IT P roducts & S ervices
Publi c Relat ions Services
Commercial A rt & Graphic Design
Libraries & Research Organizat ions
Print ing & P ubl ishing
Schools & E ducational Services
Scient ific I nst rum ents
Museums, Gal leri es & Z oos
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Printing and Publishing
Travmar D esti nation Di rectory
Printin g Eq uipme nt Guide
Medi ca Pre ss Inc.
New Med ia Advantag e
Medi acity Provi dence
Oce an Sta te Bin dery
Domi nican Co mmu nicatio ns
Corp oration
86
47
Colleges & Universities in the Providence Region
Number of Students
5,739 undergrad,269
Providence, RI, Lincoln, grad, 316 medical
RI, Warwick, RI
students; 7,324 total
Location
Brown University
Bryant College
Smithfield, RI
Community College of
Rhode Island
Warwick, RI
Johnson & Wales
University
Providence, RI
2,600
10,437 part-time, 5,146
full time
9,000
New England Institute
of Technology
Warwick, RI
2,600
Providence College
Providence , RI
3,742
Rhode Island College Providence, RI
Rhode Island School of
Design
Providence, RI
Roger Williams
University
Bristol, RI
6,101
University of Rhode
Island
Kingston, RI,
Providence, RI
2,110
11,036 undergraduates
and 2,228 graduates;
14,264 total
Levels of programs
Undergraduate, graduate - arts
and sciences, medical school
Bachelor programs, masters
programs in business
Associate degree
Associate degree and bachelor
degree
Departments of interest
Urban Studies Department
MBA, BSBA
Associate degree in business
administration
Business programs
Manufacturing desgin program;
B.S in business maganement
Associate and bachelor degrees technology
Bachelor programs, masters business, education, theology,
history, Bible, Ministry
Social Work Department; MBA
B.A. in Labor Studies; Social
Bachelor programs, masters Work Department - BSW, MSW
arts & sciences, social work,
(required field work for both);
education, accounting
B.A. in management;
Bachelor and masters programs
Associate and bachelor
programs; law school
Bachelor programs, masters arts, sciences, business,
oceanography, city planning,
music, marine affairs, library
studies; Ph.D in Business
Administration
Associate and B.S. in business
programs
College of Business
Administration - 8
undergraduate degrees, MBA
degree, Ph.D degree
87
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
ICIC’s Work Builds on Recent Studies, and
Helps Inform Ongoing Efforts
Representative List
Conducted by
2001
2001
1998
RI Economic
Policy Council
10 WAYS TO SUCCEED WITHOUT LOSING OUR SOUL
1999
1999
RIPEC & Rhode
Island Foundation
CITIES COUNT
City of Providence &
RIPEC
PROVIDENCE - NEW CITIES, ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS STUDY
CHARTING RHODE ISLAND’S
COURSE TO THE NEW ECONOMY
RI Economic
Policy Council
EMPOWERMENT ZONE APPLICATION
1998
Providence Plan
URBAN STRATEGY PROJECT
FACT BASE
ISSUE
IDENTIFICATION
STRATEGY
FORMULATION
RIPEC
ACTION
PLAN
IMPLEMENTATION
The Neighborhood Market Analysis provides a needed fact base at
the neighborhood level.
88
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Current Efforts Related to Economic Development
Region/State
City
Nbrhd
Research / Strategic
Planning
•Department of Planning and
Development
Providence Plan
•Workforce Partnership of
Greater Rhode Island
•Rhode Island Economic
Policy Council
•Grow Smart RI
•netWORKri
•HRIC
•Workforce Partnership of
Greater Rhode Island
•Providence/Cranston
Workforce Development
Office
Business Attraction
•Verizon Foundation
•RIEDC
•National Grid USA grants
•RITEC
•RI Manufacturing Partnerhsip
Minority Business
Development
•RIEDC - Procurement
Assistance Center
•Mill Building Revitalization Act
•RIEDC Smart Building
Initiative
•RIPEC
Entrepreneurship
Training & Support
•Rhode Island EDC
•mass-exodus.com
•Greater Prov. Chamber
Small Business Advisory
Services
•Greater Elmwood Neighborhood
•SWAP mentoring program for Services - Micro Business Peer
neighborhood contractors
Group Lending Program
•The Algonquin House
•S. Prov. Development Corp.
•RIEDC - Urban Ventures
Business Retention
•DownCity Partnership
•Enterprise Community
•City PR Storefront Program
•PEDC Revolving Loan fund
•City PR Business Liaison
Program
•Center to Advance Minority
Participation in the Building
Trades
City
Nbrhd
•NetWORKri
Business Environment
•Neighborhood Improvement
Program
•Southside Investment
Partnership
•Main Streets
•Jewelry District
Association
Workforce Development
Region/State
Industry/Cluster-Specific
Advocacy and Support
•City PR Business Liaison
Program
•Urban Ventures
•RIEDC - Minority Business
•RI Urban Enterprise
Enterprise Program
Equity Fund
•Rhode Island Coalition for
•First Stop Business
•Rhode Island EDC
Minority Investment
Information Center
•RISBA
•Charles Newton - state
•Slater Centers
•Greater Prov Chamber
• office of Minority Bus. Dev.
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
•PEDC Revolving Loan fund
•Prov. Planning & Dev’t
•Rhode Island EDC
•Greater Prov. Chamber
Small Business Finance
•Greater Elmwood
Neighborhood Services Micro Business Peer Group
Lending Program
•Urban Revitalization Fund
•Rhode Island Small Business
Loan Fund Corporation
89
Current Efforts Related to Economic Development (II)
Strategic Planning
Industry/Cluster-Specific
Advocacy and Support
Business Environment
Business Attraction
Business Retention
Small Business Advisory
Services
Small Business Finance
City
Nbrhd
•South Providence
Development Corporation
•LISC
Region/State
•Manufacturing Jewelers
and Suppliers of America
•Rhode Island Printing
Industry Coalition
•Prov. Warwick Conv’n &
Visitors Bureau
Minority Business
Development
Entrepreneurship
Training & Support
Region/State
City
Nbrhd
Workforce Development
•OSHEAN
•RI Foundation&Clean Land Fund
Greater Prov. Chamber
90
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
Providence Working Group
Champions:
Donna Cupelo, President and CEO, Verizon
John Palmieri, Department of Planning and Developing
Lawrence Reilly, National Grid USA
Lisa Churchville, General Manager, WJAR TV
Pat McLaughlin, Director of Administration, City of Providence
George Vecchione, President and CEO, Lifespan
Implementation Group:
Kip Bergstrom, Director, Rhode Island Economic Policy Council Director
Robert Leaver, Project Manager, Organizational Futures
Justin Aina, Urban Ventures
Peter Armato, President, Downcity Partnership
Thomas Avila, Center for Hispanic Policy and Advocacy
Victor Barros, RI Economic Development Corp.
Dan Baudoui, Providence Foundation
Jay Coogan, Dean of Fine Arts, Rhode Island School of Design
Thomas Deller, RI Housing Corporation
Michael Hogue, Jewelry District Corp.
Edward Mazze, PhD, Dean of Business Administration, University of RI
Pat McGuigan, The Providence Plan
Sharon Conard Wells, West Elmwood Housing Development
Roseanne Cronan, Community Revitalization Coordinator, Rhode Island Housing
Armeather Gibbs, Fleet Bank
Barbara Fields Karlin, Local Initiative Support Coalition
David Knowles, Greater Elmwood Neighborhood Services
Kari Lang, West Broadway Neighborhood Association
Peter Marino, Rhode Island Public Expenditure Council
Joseph Newsome, South Providence Development Corporation
Ken Orenstein, Heritage Harbor
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
91
Bibliography
Reports
•
The Impact on RI Companies of the
Events of September 11, 2001 (2001)
•
A Rhode Island Economic Strategy: 10
Ways to Succeed Without Loosing Our
Soul (2001)
•
Providence New Cities: Economic
Competitiveness Study (2000)
•
Cranston Street Revitalization Project
(1999)
•
Strengthening Cities: A Report of the
Urban Strategy Project (1998)
•
Making Connections and Designing Our
Future (1998)
•
Rhode Island Higher Education and the
New Economy: Proceedings of
Conference on March 11, 1998. (also put
out in 1998)
•
Rhode Island Higher Education and the
New Economy: A White Paper. 1998
•
Opportunity Knocking in the West End of
Providence (1997)
•
West End Resident Needs Assessment
Study (1997)
•
The Providence Enterprise Community
Assessment (Providence Plan 1998-2002)
Interviews:
•
Marisa Quinn, Brown University
•
Ed Mazze, URI
•
Tom Sepe & Jack White, CCRI
•
Gerry Inman, RISD
•
Dennis Stark, URI
•
Jay Coogan, RISD
•
Gerard Bertrand, Rhode Island Economic
Development Corporation
•
Al Lubrano, Technical Materials
•
Scott Young, Precision Industries
•
Jeff Grove, Pilgrim Screw
•
Clinton Whitman, Kraemer Findings
•
Robert Goodwin, Goodwin, Bradley, Pattern
Company
•
Steve Fielding, CEO, Fielding Manufacturing
•
Dana Salvadore, Atlantic Company
•
Gregg Morrow, Frank Morrow Co
•
Joanne Gadwah, JMT Epoxy
•
John Cronin, RIMES
•
Peter Marino, RIPEC
•
Ken Duffin, Jr., Rhode Island Economic
Development Corporation
•
Lisa Medeiros, Manufacturers’ Partnership
Copyright © 2002 Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (www.icic.org).
92
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