National Senior Certificate - 2013
Portfolio Committee on Basic
Education
18 February 2014
1
Presentation Outline
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Introduction
Purpose and design of ANA
Verification process - ANA
Results of ANA 2013
Plans for 2014 and beyond - ANA
Overall systemic improvements - NSC
Quality improvements - NSC
Key Aea
of concern
Diagnostic subject analysis
– NSC
Progress - Sector
Lessons learnt
Priorities for 2014 and Focus areas
Retention Rate
District Support
Value of Matric Certificate
Conclusion
2
ANA 2013
INTRODUCTION
1. Improving the quality of basic education is the core
mandate of the Department of Basic Education.
2. ANA 2013 presents opportunities to reflect on what
has been achieved, lessons to be learnt and
challenges that still need to be tackled towards
achieving the goals specified in the Action Plan to
2014: Towards the Realisation of Schooling 2025
INTRODUCTION
3. ANA is uniquely a South African initiative designed to
address the historical and socio-economic realities of
the country
4. Currently ANA serves a two-fold purpose, viz.
• a diagnostic tool to identify strengths and weaknesses
down to learner level.
• a systemic tool to monitor performance of the system and
track trends over time.
ANA VERIFICATION
• For a sample of approximately 125 schools per province an
independent agent:– Monitored testing administration.
– Marked the test independently.
– Captured and processed the marks
– Reported the results
• Verified results per province agreed closely with marks
received directly from schools
CREDIBILITY MEASURES - ANA 2013
• Tests were developed by panels of subject and assessment experts
selected across the country.
• The tests were to various quality assurance mechanisms: internal
moderation, editing, a pilot run, external review.
• A common test administration manual was utilised to ensure uniformity
across all schools.
• Administration of tests in schools was monitored by districts, provinces,
independent monitors appointed by DBE, DBE officials and IQMS
moderators.
LIMITATIONS OF ANA 2013
• ANA is an evolving system and therefore there is much to be
done in improving its reliability and validity.
• ANA attempts to address two significantly different purposes
and, therefore, this may limit the extent and
comprehensiveness to which each purpose is fully served.
• Test items were exposed and therefore different test items
were designed in each of these three years.
• ANA was administered in the third quarter and therefore it was
based on selected coverage of the curriculum.
ANA RESULTS 2013
MATHEMATICS – NATIONAL RESULTS
GRADE
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
AVERAGE PERCENTAGE MARK MATHEMATICS
2012
2013
68
60
57
59
41
53
37
37
30
33
27
39
13
14
LEARNERS OBTAINING 50% AND MORE OF THE
MATHEMATICS MARKS
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
2012
40
2013
30
20
10
0
3
6
Grade
9
FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE – NATIONAL RESULTS
GRADE
AVERAGE PERCENTAGE MARK –
FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
2012
2013
4
34
39
5
30
37
6
36
46
9
35
33
LEARNERS OBTAINING 50% AND MORE OF THE
FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE MARKS
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
2012
40
2013
30
20
10
0
6
9
Grade
GRADE 3 MATHEMATICS AVERAGE PERCENTAGE
MARK
100
90
80
70
Percentage
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
40.5
FS
44.7
GP
46.9
KZN
42.2
LP
34.4
MP
35.6
NC
37.9
NW
34.1
WC
47.4
National
41.2
2013
50.6
54.9
58.9
55.5
45.5
47.8
50.5
49.1
57.4
53.1
GRADE 3 MATHEMATICS ACCEPTABLE
ACHIEVEMENT
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
34.9
FS
41.8
GP
47.9
KZN
37.6
LP
23.7
MP
25
NC
31.2
NW
23.4
WC
48
National
36.3
2013
54.9
63.2
69.6
64
44.4
50.2
54
51.9
66
59.1
GRADE 3 LANGUAGE AVERAGE PERCENTAGE
MARK
100
90
80
70
Percentage
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
50.3
FS
56.3
GP
54.8
KZN
53.5
LP
47.9
MP
48
NC
49.4
NW
46.4
WC
57.1
National
52
2013
47
54.4
54.5
55.3
46.9
47
46.2
46.8
49.9
50.8
GRADE 3 LANGUAGE ACCEPTABLE ACHIEVEMENT
100
90
80
70
Percentage
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
52.7
FS
65.2
GP
61.7
KZN
59.2
LP
48.8
MP
48.9
NC
51.4
NW
46.3
WC
67.4
National
56.6
2013
50.2
65.7
63.1
64.5
49.9
51.4
48.6
50.1
54.9
57
GRADE 6 MATHEMATICS AVERAGE PERCENTAGE
MARK
100
90
80
70
Percentage
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
24.9
FS
28.4
GP
30.9
KZN
28.1
LP
21.4
MP
23.4
NC
23.8
NW
23.6
WC
32.7
National
26.7
2013
33
40
44.7
41.2
32.9
33.6
35.6
36.5
44.9
39
GRADE 6 MATHEMATICS ACCEPTABLE
ACHIEVEMENT
100
90
80
70
Percentage
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
8.1
FS
11.7
GP
16.4
KZN
11.8
LP
4.6
MP
5.7
NC
7.6
NW
7.1
WC
19.9
National
10.6
2013
16.2
26.5
38.4
30.4
15.3
16.1
20.5
20.8
37.7
26.5
GRADE 6 FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE AVERAGE
PERCENTAGE MARK
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
36.3
FS
37.3
GP
42.8
KZN
35.3
LP
31.7
MP
31.1
NC
36.4
NW
36.1
WC
38.3
National
35.6
2013
43.2
47.9
52.4
47.7
43.2
41.7
40.3
46.7
48.1
45.7
GRADE 6 FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
ACCEPTABLE ACHIEVEMENT
100
90
80
70
Percentage
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
25
FS
24.8
GP
38.9
KZN
23.5
LP
18.2
MP
17.6
NC
25.3
NW
24.9
WC
28.7
National
24.4
2013
36.2
45.2
56.6
44.7
35.4
34.9
29.2
42.6
46.4
41.2
GRADE 9 MATHEMATICS AVERAGE PERCENTAGE
MARK
100
90
80
70
Percentage
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
14.6
FS
14
GP
14.7
KZN
12
LP
8.5
MP
11.9
NC
13.2
NW
11.2
WC
16.7
National
12.7
2013
15.8
15.3
15.9
14.4
9
13.7
12.6
13.3
17
13.9
GRADE 9 MATHEMATICS ACCEPTABLE
ACHIEVEMENT
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
2.6
FS
3.1
GP
3.7
KZN
1.9
LP
0.5
MP
1
NC
2
NW
1.4
WC
5
National
2.3
2013
3.3
4.1
5.2
3.4
0.9
1.8
2.4
2.3
7.2
3.4
GRADE 9 FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
AVERAGE PERCENTAGE MARK
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
35
FS
37.2
GP
40.3
KZN
32.3
LP
29.8
MP
37.4
NC
37.9
NW
39.1
WC
37.2
National
34.6
2013
34.1
34.6
38.1
31.8
29.6
35.4
34.7
36.4
36
33.2
GRADE 9 FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
ACCEPTABLE ACHIEVEMENT
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
2012
EC
20.9
FS
22.9
GP
31
KZN
17.6
LP
13.7
MP
24.8
NC
26.2
NW
27
WC
22.9
National
20.8
2013
19.4
17.4
25.6
15.2
12.9
19.3
18.2
20.5
19.2
17.1
PERCENTAGE OF GRADE 3 LEARNERS IN ACHIEVEMENT
LEVELS IN MATHEMATICS
100
90
80
70
Outstanding achievement
Meritorious achievement
Percentage
60
Substantial Achievement
50
Adequate achievement
40
Moderate achievement
30
Elementary achievement
20
Not Achieved
10
0
LP
MP
NC
NW
EC
WC
KZ
FS
GT
National
PERCENTAGE OF GRADE 3 LEARNERS IN ACHIEVEMENT
LEVELS IN HOME LANGUAGE
100
90
80
70
Outstanding achievement
Meritorious achievement
Percentage
60
Substantial Achievement
50
Adequate achievement
Moderate achievement
40
Elementary achievement
30
Not Achieved
20
10
0
LP
NC
MP
EC
NW
WC
GT
KZ
FS
National
PERCENTAGE OF GRADE 6 LEARNERS IN ACHIEVEMENT
LEVELS IN MATHEMATICS
100
90
80
70
Outstanding achievement
Meritorious achievement
Percentage
60
Substantial Achievement
50
Adequate achievement
Moderate achievement
40
Elementary achievement
Not Achieved
30
20
10
0
LP
EC
MP
NC
NW
FS
KZ
WC
GT
National
PERCENTAGE OF GRADE 6 LEARNERS IN ACHIEVEMENT
LEVELS IN HOME LANGUAGE
100
90
80
70
Outstanding achievement
Meritorious achievement
Percentage
60
Substantial Achievement
Adequate achievement
50
Moderate achievement
40
Elementary achievement
Not Achieved
30
20
10
0
EC
LP
NC
MP
KZ
NW
GT
WC
FS
National
PERCENTAGE OF GRADE 6 LEARNERS IN ACHIEVEMENT
LEVELS IN FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
100
90
80
70
Outstanding achievement
Meritorious achievement
Percentage
60
Substantial Achievement
50
Adequate achievement
Moderate achievement
40
Elementary achievement
Not Achieved
30
20
10
0
NC
MP
LP
EC
NW
KZ
FS
WC
GT
National
PERCENTAGE OF GRADE 9 LEARNERS IN ACHIEVEMENT
LEVELS IN MATHEMATICS
100
90
80
70
Outstanding achievement
Meritorious achievement
Percentage
60
Substantial Achievement
50
Adequate achievement
Moderate achievement
40
Elementary achievement
Not Achieved
30
20
10
0
LP
NC
MP
NW
KZ
FS
EC
GT
WC
National
PERCENTAGE OF GRADE 9 LEARNERS IN ACHIEVEMENT
LEVELS IN FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE
100
90
80
70
Outstanding achievement
Meritorious achievement
Percentage
60
Substantial Achievement
Adequate achievement
50
Moderate achievement
40
Elementary achievement
Not Achieved
30
20
10
0
LP
KZ
EC
NC
FS
MP
WC
NW
GT
National
GRADE 3 MATHEMATICS - GENDER
100
90
80
70
Percentage
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
FEMALE
EC
52.6
FS
56.3
GP
60.7
KZN
57.4
LP
47.7
MP
49.7
NC
52.2
NW
51
WC
58.7
National
52.6
MALE
48.8
53.5
57.2
53.8
43.4
46
48.9
47.3
56.1
48.8
GRADE 3 LANGUAGE - GENDER
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
FEMALE
EC
50.9
FS
57.5
GP
58.1
KZN
59.2
LP
51.6
MP
51.2
NC
49.9
NW
50.7
WC
53.3
National
54.7
MALE
43.3
51.3
50.9
51.6
42.5
43.1
42.7
43.1
46.4
47
GRADE 6 MATHEMATICS - GENDER
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
FEMALE
EC
34.9
FS
41.4
GP
46.4
KZN
42.7
LP
34.5
MP
34.9
NC
36.4
NW
37.5
WC
45.8
National
40.4
MALE
32.1
38.6
43.1
39.9
31.4
32.4
34.7
35.5
44
37.6
GRADE 6 FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE - GENDER
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
FEMALE
MALE
EC
47
FS
51.1
GP
56.6
KZN
51.6
LP
47.5
MP
45.1
NC
44.1
NW
50.1
WC
51.6
National
49.5
39.9
44.9
48.2
44.1
39.3
38.5
36.6
43.4
44.6
42.1
GRADE 9 MATHEMATICS - GENDER
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
EC
FS
GP
KZN
LP
MP
NC
NW
WC
National
FEMALE
16.6
16
17.1
15.2
9.9
14.3
12.9
14.1
17
14.8
MALE
15.2
14.7
14.7
13.6
8.3
13.2
12.2
12.6
17
13.1
GRADE 9 FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE - GENDER
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
EC
FS
GP
KZN
LP
MP
NC
NW
WC
National
FEMALE
36.7
36.8
41.8
35.1
33.2
38.2
37.6
39.3
38.2
36.4
MALE
31.6
32.5
34.9
28.8
26.7
32.7
32
33.7
33.5
30.4
GRADE 3 SUBJECTS BY QUINTILE
100
90
80
70
Percentage
60
50
Mathematics
Home Language
40
30
20
10
0
1
2
3
Quintile
4
5
GRADE 6 SUBJECTS BY QUINTILE
100
90
80
70
Percentage
60
Mathematics
50
Home Language
40
First Additional Language
30
20
10
0
1
2
3
Quintile
4
5
GRADE 9 SUBJECTS BY QUINTILE
100
90
80
Percentage
70
60
Mathematics
50
40
Home Language
30
First Additional Language
20
10
0
1
2
3
Quintile
4
5
AVERAGE PERCENTAGE MARK FOR GRADE 3 IN SPECIAL SCHOOLS
PROVINCE
EC
FS
GP
KZ
LP
MP
NC
NW
WC
National
HOME LANGUAGE
54.1
38.6
46.5
52.9
32.1
*
50.7
39.8
52.4
48.6
MATHEMATICS
63.9
36.7
53.5
58
32.8
46.2
62.4
46.1
60.7
54.6
AVERAGE PERCENTAGE MARK FOR GRADE 6 IN SPECIAL
SCHOOLS
PROVINCE
EC
HOME
LANGUAGE
FIRST ADDITIONAL
LANGUAGE
MATHEMATICS
56.7
35.7
21.0
FS
63.7
28.4
35.2
GP
56.3
35.6
34.9
KZ
64.9
43.4
44.8
LP
33.7
*
26.6
MP
*
26.7
17.7
NC
50.5
*
37.8
NW
63.4
52.3
50.2
WC
57.7
41.3
35.2
National
57.0
39.5
35.8
AVERAGE PERCENTAGE MARKS FOR INDEPENDENT
SCHOOLS
SUBJECT
GRADE
PUBLIC
INDEPENDENT
MATHEMATICS
3
53.3
57.7
6
39
49.3
3
51
54.1
6
58.5
66.9
HOME LANGUAGE
DISTRICT ACHIEVEMENT – GRADE 3
Average % in district
Mathematics
HL
Higher than 60%
7
0
Between 40 and 60%
73
77
Lower than 40%
1
4
DISTRICT ACHIEVEMENT – GRADE 6
Average % in district Mathematics
HL
FAL
Higher than 60%
0
30
1
Between 40 and 60%
37
46
69
Lower than 40%
44
5
11
DISTRICT ACHIEVEMENT – GRADE 9
Average % in district Mathematics
HL
FAL
Higher than 60%
0
2
0
Between 40 and 60%
0
46
6
81
33
75
Lower than 40%
WAY FORWARD
• The national report is a first step of feedback on the
assessment.
• A diagnostic report on identified strengths and
challenges for teaching and learning has been given
to schools in January 2014.
• DBE and PEDs are embarking on a focused
intervention strategy to improve literacy and numeracy
learning.
WAY FORWARD
• Greater & wider focus will be directed to Senior Phase
to include Grades 7 & 8 in the assessment.
• DBE and PEDs are mounting a concerted strategy to
improve the effectiveness of teaching and learning of
mathematics throughout the school system.
NSC 2013
Significance of the NSC Exams
a)
b)
The NSC examination results has emerged as a key indicator of the
performance of the basic education system.
The NSC results over the last five years, point to the attainment of stability
in the system and gradual improvement in learner outcomes at exit level.
c)
In 2013, focus has been on consolidating the gains and improving
teaching and learning across the system.
d)
e)
Emphasis in 2013 on improvement in the quality of passes.
Hence focus on:
•
•
•
increasing the number of bachelor passes.
increasing the number of subject passes at 40%
improvement in Mathematics and Physical Science and other
gateway subjects.
51
Scope and Size of 2013 NSC Exams
Total Candidates:
Full Time Candidates:
Part Time Candidates :
Question Papers:
Printed Question Papers:
Scripts:
Examination Centres:
Invigilators:
Markers:
Marking Centres:
707 136
576 490
130 646
258
9.1 million
8.7 million
6676
65 000
35 000
118
52
Numbers of candidates who wrote, 2008 - 2013
53
53
Candidates who wrote the 2013 NSC examination
Province
2013
Total wrote
72 138
27 105
97 897
145 278
82 483
50 053
29 140
10 403
47 615
562 112
Eastern Cape
Free State
Gauteng
KwaZulu-Natal
Limpopo
Mpumalanga
North West
Northern Cape
Western Cape
National
54
Overall Systemic Improvements
55
STANDARDISATION OF NSC RESULTS: 2008-2013
Year
Subjects
2008
56
2009
Raw marks Adjusted
accepted
downwards
Adjusted
upwards
58
31 (55%)
43 (74%)
25
5
10
2010
58
39 (67%)
10
9
2011
56
45 (80%)
8
3
2012
58
41(71%)
12
5
2013
59
38(64%)
16
5
NSC Performance: 2008 to 2013
57
Overall performance of candidates in the
2013 NSC examinations
2013
Province
Total Wrote
Total Achieved
Eastern Cape
72 138
46 840
% Achieved
64.9
Free State
27 105
23 689
87.4
Gauteng
97 897
85 122
87.0
KwaZulu-Natal
145 278
112 403
77.4
Limpopo
82 483
59 184
71.8
Mpumalanga
50 053
38 836
77.6
North West
29 140
25 414
87.2
Northern Cape
10 403
7 749
74.4
Western Cape
47 615
562 112
40 452
439 779
85.1
National
58
78.2
Quality Improvements
59
NSC Passes by Qualification Type
60
NSC passes by type of qualification, 2013
Bachelor
Province
Total
Wrote
Diploma
Higher Certificate
NSC
No.
Achieved
%
Achieved
No.
Achieved
%
Achieved
No.
Achieved
%
Achieved
No.
Achieved
%
Achieved
Total
Achieved
%
Achieved
EC
72 138
13 686
19.0
19 179
26.6
13 950
19.3
25
0.0
46 840
64.9
FS
27 105
8 961
33.1
10 089
37.2
4 636
17.1
3
0.0
23 689
87.4
GP
97 897
38 104
38.9
33 716
34.4
13 295
13.6
7
0.0
85 122
87.0
KZN
145 278
47 202
32.5
42 760
29.4
22 328
15.4
113
0.1
112 403
77.4
LP
82 483
18 781
22.8
22 694
27.5
17 695
21.5
14
0.0
59 184
71.8
MP
50 053
12 954
25.9
16 366
32.7
9 507
19.0
9
0.0
38 836
77.6
NW
29 140
10 166
34.9
10 249
35.2
4 998
17.2
1
0.0
25 414
87.2
NC
10 403
2 424
23.3
3 207
30.8
2 118
20.4
0
0.0
7 749
74.5
WC
47 615
19 477
40.9
15 032
31.6
6 029
12.7
4
0.0
40 542
85.1
562 112
171 755
30.6
173 292
30.8
94 556
16.8
176
0.1
439 779
78.2
NATIONAL
61
Bachelors - Targets
Prov.
EC
2012
Target
2012
Pass
2013
Target
2013
Pass
2014
Target
Difference in 2013
Target and Pass %
of 2013
12 056
11 246
13 108
13686
14 159
578 (4.4%)
FS
6 945
6 937
7 551
8961
8 157
1 410 (18.67%)
GP
36 905
32 449
40 124
38104
43 343
2020 (5.03%)
KZN
37 099
34 779
40 335
47202
43 571
6 867 (17.02%)
LP
17 399
15 324
18 917
18781
20 436
-136(0.7%)
MP
9 607
9 495
10 446
12954
11 285
2 508 (24%)
NW
9 459
7 445
10 285
10166
11 111
-119 (1.15%)
NC
2 538
2 055
2 760
2424
2 982
-336 (-12.17%)
WC
16 992
16 317
18 474
19477
19 956
1 003 (5.42%)
149 000
136 047
162 000
171755
175 000
9755 (6.02%)
NATIONAL
62
Bachelor Pass Trend (Percentage) : 2008 -2013
63
Bachelor Pass Trend (Numbers): 2008 -2013
64
NSC Passes by Type of Qualification per Quintile: 2013
2012
2013
Quintiles
Q 1-3
Q 4-5
Q 1-3
Q 4-5
No. of Bachelors
61 300
65 292
78 407
81 406
65
School Performance within different
Percentage Categories
66
Schools performance within different percentage categories, 2013
2012
School Intervals
0 - 19.9%
20 - 39.9%
40 to 59.9%
60 to 79.9%
80 to 100%
Exactly 0%
Exactly 100%
Total
Number
of school
126
484
1 229
2 176
2 608
2
441
% of
schools
1.9
7.3
18.6
32.9
39.4
0.0
6.7
67
2013
Total
Number
of school
82
334
991
1 999
3 270
9
551
% of
schools
1.2
5.0
14.8
29.9
49.9
0.1
8.3
School Performance by Quintiles
68
School performance by Quintile - 2013
Quintiles 0 - 19.9%
20 - 39.9%
40 - 59.9%
60 - 79.9%
80 - 100%
Total
Quintile 1
31
138
327
532
631
1 659
Quintile 2
26
81
307
606
658
1 678
Quintile 3
14
70
215
477
543
1 319
Quintile 4
2
8
71
199
413
693
Quintile 5
1
12
23
84
620
740
74
309
943
1 898
2 865
6 089
Total
69
Subject Performance
70
Candidates’ performance in selected subjects, 2009 – 2013 (at 30% level)
Subjects
Accounting
2009
61.5
2010
62.8
2011
61.6
2012
65.6
2013
65.7
Agricultural Science
51.7
62.6
71.3
73.7
80.7
Business Studies
71.9
71.1
78.6
77.4
81.9
Economics
Geography
History
71.6
72.3
72.2
75.2
69.2
75.8
64
70
75.9
72.8
75.8
86
73.9
80
87.1
Life Orientation
99.6
99.6
99.6
99.7
99.8
Life Sciences
65.5
74.6
73.2
69.5
73.7
Mathematical Literacy
74.7
86.0
85.9
87.4
87.1
Mathematics
46.0
47.4
46.3
54
59.1
Physical Science
36.8
47.8
53.4
61.3
67.4
71
Candidates’ performance in selected subjects, 2009 – 2013 (at 40% level)
Subjects
Accounting
2009
36.0
2010
35.3
2011
35.8
2012
42.7
2013
41.5
Agricultural Science
21.9
32.1
39.5
41.0
49.9
Business Studies
46.7
45.9
55.4
52.9
58.2
Economics
Geography
History
English FAL
Life Sciences
31.2
39.2
46.9
72.4
39.9
46.3
40.6
52.5
71.3
51.7
33.1
42.2
52.7
76.1
46.2
45.8
46.7
65.0
82.9
43.4
45.2
53.4
67.1
88.7
47.8
Mathematical Literacy
51.0
64.7
65
61.4
62.4
Mathematics
29.4
30.9
30.1
35.7
40.5
Physical Science
20.6
29.7
33.8
39.1
42.7
72
Mathematics achieved at 30% & 40% level, 2009 - 2013
73
Physical Sciences achieved at 30% & 40% level, 2009 - 2013
74
Candidates performance in Home Languages,
2011-2013
75
Number and percentage of distinctions in the 12 Key Subjects: 2012 and 2013
Subject
Accounting
Afrikaans First Add
Language
Agricultural Science
2012
Achieved
Wrote
with
distinction
134 978
6 550
4.9
145 427
2013
Achieved with
distinction
(80% -100%)
7 789
% with
Distinction
Wrote
% with
Distinction
5.4
76 038
4 126
5.4
87 930
7 215
8.2
78 148
176
0.2
83 437
442
0.5
Business Studies
195 507
4 529
2.3
218 914
6 791
3.1
Economics
English First Add
Language
Geography
134 369
2 294
1.7
150 114
2 682
1.8
420 039
6 047
1.4
454 666
7 847
1.7
213 735
2 967
1.4
239 657
4 135
1.7
94 489
3 294
3.5
109 046
3 559
3.3
Life Sciences
278 412
6 230
2.2
301 718
7 590
2.5
Mathematical Literacy
291 341
7 189
2.5
324 097
5 972
1.8
Mathematics
225 874
6 591
2.9
241 509
8 217
3.4
Physical Sciences
179 194
5 657
3.2
184 383
5 616
3
History
76
District Performance
77
District performance by achievement interval and province: 2013
Province
Total
number of Below 50%
Districts
2013
50% to
59.9%
60% to 70% 70% to 80% 80% and
above
EC
23
0
7
11
5
0
FS
5
0
0
0
0
5
GP
15
0
0
0
0
15
KZN
12
0
0
0
10
2
LP
5
0
0
2
2
1
MP
4
0
0
0
3
1
NW
4
0
0
0
0
4
NC
5
0
0
0
4
1
WC
8
0
0
0
0
8
Total
81
0
7
13
24
37
78
District Performance by achievement interval:
2012 - 2013
40
35
Number
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
2012
2013
Below 50%
3
0
50% to
59.9%
7
7
60% to
70%
18
13
70% to
80%
25
24
80% and
above
28
37
79
Diagnostic subject Analysis
Generic Improvements
•
Improvement in the quality of answers provided, which confirms
that improvement strategies are making a difference.
•
Gradual consistent improvement in the pass rate in each of the
subjects analysed both at the 30% and 40% achievement levels.
•
Fewer candidates scoring between 0-29% in most of the
subjects.
•
Improved performance in a number of gateway subjects which
suggests interventions in these subjects are bearing fruit
Generic Shortcomings
• Inadequate linguistic skills which are required to
interpret questions and write proper paragraphs.
• Inadequate
numerical/mathematical
skills
resulting in poor performance in questions that
required Mathematical skills.
• Failure to interpret questions accurately, or apply
knowledge and skills appropriately.
Mathematics
Website: www.education.gov.za
Call Centre: 0800 202 933 | [email protected]
Twitter: @DBE_SA | Facebook: DBE SA
Mathematics P1:Avarage% performance per question
Question Topic/Section
Max Marks
Average %
1
Equations, inequalities and Algebraic Manipulation
22
67.7
2
Number Patterns & Sequences
18
50.1
3
Number Patterns & Sequences
18
42.6
4
Functions and Graphs – Parabola
10
68.0
5
Functions and Graphs – Exponential and Log Graphs
11
31.2
6
Functions and Graphs – Hyperbola and Exponential
11
40.1
7
Annuities and Finance
12
48.2
8
Calculus – 1st Principle and using the rule
17
49.6
9
Calculus – Applications in cubic graphs
11
27.6
10
Calculus – Applications in rates of change
6
28.3
11
Linear Programming
14
37.7
84
Mathematics P1:Avarage% performance per question
Graph showing average (%) performance per question
80.0
70.0
Percentage
60.0
50.0
40.0
30.0
20.0
10.0
0.0
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q5
Q6
85
Q7
Q8
Q9
Q10
Q11
Mathematics
Key area of
concern
Possible Cause
Remedial Action
Learners lack
basic knowledge
of algebra
Learners algebraic skills are poor.
They struggle with Mathematics in
grade 11 and 12 because they cannot
do the basic mathematics of Grade 8;
9 and 10. If this problem can be
rectified learners will perform much
better in the Grade 12 examination.
Solving inequality equations an area
of concern.
Learners to be exposed to
number system and how
to represent them
graphically. Set notation
needs to be emphasised.
Learners are still
copying the
quadratic formula
incorrectly from
the information
sheet.
Either they have copied it
incorrectly or they have learnt it
incorrectly and not used the formula
sheet.
Learners need to master
different methods of
solving problems.
Mathematics
Key area of
concern
Possible Cause
Remedial Action
Learners are
failing to apply the
Most learners do not understand
first principle.
or copy the formula incorrectly
Many notation
from the formula sheet.
errors occur
every year
Teachers need to stress the
importance of notation in
answering a first principles
question.
Drill and practice the rules of
differentiation using the first
principle.
Learners do not
understand the
essence of
functions
Teachers should train learners
on how to sketch a graph and
vice versa to derive its equation
if it is drawn.
Teachers are encouraged to use
various methods to find the
turning point and the axis of
symmetry.
Functions are not addressed in
full in Grade 10. This content is
not mastered by learners
Physical Sciences
Physical Sc P1: Avarage% performance per question
Graph showing average (%) performance per question
60.0
50.0
52.8
49.0
43.0
40.0
36.2
30.0
30.0
31.2
36.9
34.0
32.9
34.2
20.0
15.5
10.0
0.0
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q5
Q6
89
Q7
Q8
Q9
Q10
Q11
Physical Sc P1: Average% performance per question
Average
Performance (%)
Content
Question
Q1
One-word items – all topics
49.0
Q2
Multiple choice questions – all topics
36.2
Q3
Vertical projectile motion
30.0
Q4
Momentum
31.2
Q5
Work, energy and power
32.9
Q6
Doppler effect
43.0
Q7
2D and 3D wave motion
52.8
Q8
Electrostatics
34.0
Q9
Electric circuits
15.5
Q10
Motors, generators & alternating current
36.9
Q11
Photo-electric effect
90
34.2
Physical Sciences
Key Area of concern
What teachers should do
Inability to use and/or no access to scientific
calculators
Provide scientific calculators to learners and
teach them calculator usage skills
Inability to draw, interpret and analyse
graphs.
•Teachers should include the interpretation
and drawing of straight line graphs, parabola
and hyperbola in all the knowledge areas in
Physical Sciences
•Expose learners at least once a week to
problems that include graph drawing and
interpretation
Poor understanding of basic concepts like
wavelength, frequency, emf, internal
resistance, terminal potential difference, work
and energy and electrochemistry and organic
chemistry due to a lack of practical work.
•Learners must do practical work.
•Ensure that you have the equipment for
practical work.
•Do frequent informal testing on basic
concepts
•Integrate basic concepts in all topics
throughout the year
Physical Sciences
Key Area of concern
What teachers should do
Poor mathematical skills and knowledge, i.e.
conversions to correct units, solving equations
(linear, quadratic, fractions);
•Teachers should highlight and emphasise the
mathematical skills required in the context of all the
knowledge areas in Physical Sciences. Include
science problems that require these skills in daily
assessment.
•Provide each learner with a booklet of past
examination papers from NSC and other
examining bodies
Inability to do multi-step problem solving, i.e.
inability to grapple with problems.
•Learners must be given daily exercises that
include multi-step problem solving from past
examination papers, textbooks and Item Banks
•Learners should be exposed to questions that
integrate different knowledge areas, e.g.
momentum & electrostatics, momentum &
Newton’s Laws, etc.
•Conduct class quizzes and contests on both basic
concepts and high cognitive level problem solving.
This could be done at school, inter-school, etc
levels.
Inability to answer questions that integrate different
concepts, knowledge areas and skills
WHAT PROGRESS HAS
BEEN MADE IN THE
SECTOR?
PROVINCIAL PERFORMANCE COMPARISON (ANA & NSC 2013)
DISTRICT PERFORMANCE COMPARISON
(ANA & NSC)
PROVINCIAL PERFORMANCE COMPARISON (ANA &
NSC): 2012 & 2013
2012
2013
60
GP
WC
55
WC
GP
ANA ( %)
50
FS
KZN
KZN
45
FS
EC
NC
40
EC
MP
NW
MP
NC
LP
35
LP
NW
30
60
65
70
75
NSC (%)
80
85
90
NUMBER OF DISTRICTS (ABOVE 50% PERFORMANCE) IN ANA 2013
(AVERAGE MATHEMATICS & LANGUAGES (HL&FAL) AND NSC 2013
Province
Performing at 50% Performing
and above in both below 50% in
NSC and ANA
both NSC and
ANA
EC
FS
GP
KZN
LP
MP
NC
NW
WC
Total
0
0
13
4
0
0
1
0
8
26
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Performing at
50% and above
in NSC but below
50% in ANA
Performing at 50% Total
and above in ANA
but below 50% in
NSC
23
5
2
8
10
4
4
4
0
60
Please note: In Limpopo we used 10 districts
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
23
5
15
12
10
4
5
4
8
86
WHAT ARE THE LESSONS
LEARNT IN 2013
WHAT WORKED
Good raw marks
in the majority of
subjects in the
NSC
The classroom as
the centre-piece of
all what we do
Strong PED’s, districts
and school’s
interventions
Strong parental
and broader civil
society support
“Last push”
initiatives in
some provinces
Provision of
LTSM’s
especially study
guides.
What
worked in
2013
Strong Public
Private
partnership
Strong and consistent
message to deal with
under performance.
Implementation
of the NSLA,
PIPs, DIPs and
SIPs
Commitment by
learners, teachers,
SMT’s and officials.
Commitment by
learners, teachers,
SMT’s and officials.
Lessons shared through
Minister’s forum with
districts
Strong focus on under
performing districts,
schools and subjects
Increased
accountability at
all levels of
system
REFLECTING ON ACHIEVEMENTS
AND WEAKNESSES
“Our achievements, however, we
know full well, must not be used as
an excuse for exaggerating our
successes for ignoring errors
committed and weaknesses that
require urgent attention”
From: Nelson Mandela
100
WHAT ARE OUR
PRIORITIES FOR 2014?
STRATEGIC DIRECTION
NDP
Action Plan draws from
previous Action Plan, with
some additions from NDP.
MTSF
Action Plan and basic
education chapter of MTSF
produced in tandem.
Strategic plan draws selectively and
carefully from e.g. Action Plan.
DBE Strategic plan
Action Plan
Key points from
Action Plan.
Delivery
agreement
102
PRIORITIES
INFRASTRUCTURE
WORK
BOOKS
ANA
CAPS
103
FOCUS AREAS
Early Childhood
Development
Curriculum
Assessment and
Policy Statement
(CAPS)
Languages,
Maths, Science
and Technology
(LMST)
National Strategy
for Learner
Attainment(NSLA)
104
2014 INTERVENTIONS
CAPS, Curriculum
Coverage & School
Based Assessment
Teacher Text and
Time
ANA & NSC Road
Shows
Languages,
Mathematics,
Science &
Technology (MST)
ICT, Teacher
development &
Support
2014 NSLA
Improve
accountability,
consistency, quality,
excellence &
communication
Classroom is
the centre
piece
English Across the
Curriculum (EAC)
Inclusivity & Learner
retention
Target setting,
tracking learner
performance &
measuring impact
Improve quality in
ECD
Subject, Grades,
phase & district
specific
interventions
2014 GET FOCUS AREAS
CAPS &
Curriculum
coverage
SBA
2014 GET
FOCUS
AREAS
Languages and
MST
Reading
106
2014 ECD FOCUS AREAS
CAPS &
Curriculum
implementation
Curriculum for
0-4 years
2014 ECD
FOCUS
AREAS
Conditions of
Service
Improved
Qualifications
107
2014 SP FOCUS AREAS
CAPS &
Curriculum
coverage
SBA
2014 SP
FOCUS
AREAS
Career and Subject
Choices
Languages
Mathematics
108
2014 FET FOCUS AREAS
CAPS &
Curriculum
coverage
High Enrolment
subjects
2014 FET
FOCUS
AREAS
English Across
the Curriculum
Languages and MST
SBA
109
WHAT PROGRESS HAS
BEEN MADE ON
RETENTION?
PRINCIPLES USUALLY USED TO
ASSESS THE PERFORMANCE OF
AN EDUCATION SYSTEM
• Access
• Redress
• Equity
• Quality
• Efficiency
FACTORS DETERMINING LEARNER
RETENTION IN THE SECTOR
• Available subjects/streams and pathways
of for selections.
• The quality of teaching and learning
• Implementation of remedial and support
programmes
• Culling of learners
• Repetition
• Dropout
FACTORS
INFLUENCING
LEARNER
RETENTION
Website: www.education.gov.za
Call Centre: 0800 202 933 | [email protected]
Twitter: @DBE_SA | Facebook: DBE SA
CONCERNS EXPRESSED ABOUT SCHOOLING, 2008 - 2011
Year
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Lack of
books
22.5
20.5
15.7
16.8
14.8
11.4
11.0
6.6
6.4
6.0
Fees too
high
17.8
16.7
14.4
13.6
11.8
7.0
7.7
4.4
4.8
4.8
Facilities in
bad condition
10.5
9.9
8.3
7.5
8.0
5.4
5.3
3.6
4.1
4.4
Classes too
large
6.6
6.6
7.0
6.5
7.4
4.9
4.8
3.3
5.0
5.0
Poor
Lack of
teachers teaching
4.4
5.1
3.7
4.2
2.8
4.0
3.7
4.5
3.4
4.0
6.0
8.5
3.5
3.8
2.1
2.4
2.3
2.0
2.8
2.5
Source: Statistics South Africa, General Household Survey, 2009 2011, DBE own analysis
PUBLIC SATISFACTION INDICATORS
16
Percentage of learners
14
12
Lack of books
10
Poor quality of teaching
Lack of teachers
8
Facilities in bad condition
6
Fees too high
4
Classes too large/too
many learners
2
0
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
School Household Survey 2012
PERCENTAGE OF REPEATERS BY GRADE 2009 TO 2012
116
Data source: Statistics
TRENDS IN REPETITION 2009-2012
117
DROP OUT RATES DECLINING BUT QUALITY PROBLEMS
MANIFEST IN SECONDARY SCHOOLING
Drop out rates declining - negligible in foundation phase.
Percentage of those who are not enrolled at the time of the survey (2008 and 2010) and had not completed grade 12
by their grade in the preceding year
16
14
13.4
12.3
12
11
10.6
10
11.4
9.3
8
6.5
6
5.4
2007-2008
5.7
2009-2010
3.6
4
3.1
2.1
2
0.9
0.4
0
1.4
0.9
0.8
0
0.3
0
0
1.2
0
0
Grade 1
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Grade 7
118
Grade 8
Grade 9
Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12
FACTORS AFFECTING THE
THROUGHPUT RATE
• The use of Grade 1 enrolment which
is unreliable (Grade 2 will be more
appropriate to use)
• Repetition rate
• Learners who continue their studies
with FET colleges and SETA’s and
are not properly accounted for in our
information.
PROGRESS IN GRADE 12 THROUGHPUT
RATE
YEAR
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
% PROGRESS
28.0%
34.2%
37.7%
38.2%
40.4%
PROGRESS ON GRADE 12 LEARNERS
PASSES
LONG TERM VIEWS
YEAR
NO. OF GR. 12 PASSES
1970
43 000
1990
191 000
2000
283 294
2013
439 779
COMPARISION OF GR 12
THROUGHPUT RATE WITH SOME OF
THE DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
COUNTRY
SOUTH AFRICA
TURKEY
BRAZIL
THROUGHPUT
RATE IN GR 12
40%
53%
67%
COUNTRIES SUPPORTING AUTOMATIC
PROMOTION & PROGRESSION
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Britain
Japan
Korea
Ireland
Finland
Sweden
Norway and
Denmark
NB. Such countries seldom use repetition and support automatic
promotion with strong additional support to weaker learners.
HOW CAN WE IMPROVE RETENTION
AND THROUGHPUT RATE?
• Ensure compliance with policy on
admission of learners and promotion
and progression
• Increase available options for
subjects/streams and pathways
• Improve the quality of teaching and
learning
• Implement strong remedial and support
programmes for weaker learners.
HOW CAN WE IMPROVE RETENTION
AND THROUGHPUT RATE?
• Screening, Identification, Assessment
and Support (SIAS) should benefit all
learners especially at lower grades and
entry level.
• Strengthen our information systems to
afford us accurate data on a yearly
basis
• Commission a research
WHERE SHOULD WE
FOCUS TO TURN THE
SECTOR AROUND?
THE ROLE OF DISTRICTS
“Districts should provide targeted support to
improve practices within schools and
ensure communication and information
sharing between authorities and schools.
Schools need to share best practices. This
requires teachers to carry out assessment
practices that enable learners to compare
their performance with their counterparts in
other schools in the district.”
National Planning Commission: Diagnostic Report, November 2011
127
DISTRICT MONITORING AND SUPPORT
“It needs to be easy to identifiable areas where
improvements in teaching and learning are
required. This means policy-makers and
districts need to be able to access information
that helps them determine the rate and extent
of progress, including the reasons for under
performance and schools requiring
intervention. Most importantly it requires that
adequate and appropriate capacity exists to
support schools that are performing poorly”
National Planning Commission: Diagnostic Report, November 2011.
128
DISTRICT SUPPORT
Satisfaction by province
EC
FS
GP
KZN
LP
MP
NC
NW
WC
SA
% not
satisfied
%
somewhat
satisfied
32
12
9
17
20
9
13
29
4
19
11
10
10
15
10
13
13
10
12
11
% satisfied
% very
satisfied
Total
52
63
67
60
60
65
68
55
67
60
5
15
14
8
10
13
6
6
17
10
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
129
WHAT IS THE VALUE OF
THE MATRIC
CERTIFICATE IN THE
LABOUR MARKET?
Clare Hofmeyr, Nicola Branson, Murray Leibbrandt,
Cally Ardington, David Lam (14/10/13), UCT
CHARACTERISTICS BY BIRTH COHORT (MEN)
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS
• Educational attainment has risen steadily
over the last five decades.
• More recent cohorts having larger
proportions of post-primary graduates than
their predecessors.
• A greater proportion of these men (with a
growing proportion of matric graduates
among them) became economically active
in the labour market.
CONCLUSION
• Increasing levels of youth unemployment and
learners’ poor performance at school have led to
claims that the matric certificate no longer has
much value in the labour market.
• However, the evidence does not support this
claim.
• While the labour market conditions facing
secondary school graduates have indeed
worsened with time, the value of a matric
certificate relative to that of grade 10 and 11 has
remained positive both in terms of earnings and
the likelihood of finding employment.
THANK YOU
Website: www.education.gov.za
Call Centre: 0800 202 933 | [email protected]
Twitter: @DBE_SA | Facebook: DBE SA
Descargar

Document