UMass Memorial Medical Center
Times: They are a' Changing
Generational Differences
in the
Health Care Industry
UMass Memorial Medical Center
• Part of UMass Memorial Health Care System
– Over 12,000 employees in system
– Serve approx. 4,000 patients per day
• Network of care: three hospitals, community-based
physician practices, home health, hospice,
rehabilitation and behavioral health services
• Clinical partner with UMass Medical School
Snapshot of Initiatives
• Youth Initiatives
– Building Brighter Futures – 50-55 youth each
summer, year round – part-time employment
– WIA Funding – 5-8 young adults any time of year
– Community College Connection – up to 20
summer youth
– Volunteer Services 60+ students each summer in
addition to the 50+ during the school year
Snapshot of Initiatives
• Community
– Administrative Fellowship
– Career PATH Internship Program
– Professional Administrative Tracks in Health Care
– Partner with local community-based organizations
on information and job training efforts
Snapshot of Initiatives
• Incumbent Worker Sample
– Learn at Work grant – pre-college math and English
– Skill related classes - medical terminology, computer
skills, etc
– Older worker grant and committee
– Career specific focus areas - E.g. medical technology
and Health Information Technology
– English for Speakers of Other Languages
The Workforce
of
Today and Tomorrow
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Generational Differences in the Workplace
• Today’s workforce is composed of four
distinct generations:
–Traditionalists (working past retirement)
–Baby Boomers
–Generation X
–Millennials
American Hospital Association Environmental Scan 2011
Generational Differences in the Workplace
• Continuing presence of Baby Boomers
• Growing presence of Generation X and
Millennial workers with different work
interests and expectations
• All require more flexibility on the part of the
employer
American Hospital Association Environmental Scan 2011
The Baby Boomers (45 to 64 years old)
• Raised in nuclear families
• Described as “optimistic” and “egocentric”
• Love/hate relationship with authority; Prefer
consensus leadership style
• Like to feel empowered, asked for their feedback
• Team-oriented, enjoy collegiality and peer-to-peer
situations
• Motivated by public recognition and perks
Generation X (30 to 45 years old)
• Many raised by single parents and/or latchkey children
• No loyalty to corporate culture; Unimpressed by authority;
described as “skeptical”
• Value learning environment, self reliance, rapid goal
attainment, work-life balance, and technology
• Believe in merit-based recognition and career advancement
• Value rewards like paid time off, cash awards, or participation
in cutting edge projects
The Millennials (10 to 30 years old)
• Second largest generational cohort
• Raised with violence, terrorism, and drugs as
realities of life
• Drawn to “family” for safety and security
• Optimistic, goal-oriented, and ambitious
• Global generation accepting of multiculturalism
• Technology always a part of their lives
The Millennials (10 to 30 years old)
• Demand / Desire
– Work-life balance
– Rapid promotions
– Coaching, guidance, and personal development
– Personal feedback
– Fun environment
– Structure and flexibility and constant change
– Like internships
• Difficult to retain –high turnover in this generation
if their expectations and needs are not met
Mixing Generations in the Workplace
• We need to attract and retain a younger workforce to
work with and/or be supervised by “older” workers
“Need for speed” vs. cautious and measured
“Live and breathe technology” vs. avoidance of technology
“I want you to help me have fun and tell me I’m doing a good job.”
vs.
“Just put your head down and do your work!”
All are asked to function successfully in a
changing, challenging environment…
The New Generation
of Health Care
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Organizational Effectiveness
Supported by Individual Performance
High performing health systems demonstrate a culture of:
Performance Excellence and Accountability for Results
– Focus on continuous improvement
– Dramatic improvement or perfection vs. incremental change
– Patient-centered care
– Internal and external transparency
– Defined expectations as basis for accountability of results
American Hospital Association Environmental Scan 2011
Implications of Performance Excellence and
Accountability for Results
Continued fast pace of change in health care delivery and in
workforce demographics will place significant stress on
the workforce
– Will impact employee morale
– Limited # of skilled workers available
– Efficiency measures - “Do More with Less”
Will require increased efforts in change management,
building stronger internal cultures, strengthening leadership,
and attract and retaining top-notch workforce
American Hospital Association Environmental Scan 2011
What’s Driving Change?
Examples
• Aging population requires ongoing care for chronic
conditions – higher volume, longer care
• Increased demand for out-patient and at-home services
Goal = hospitalization as last resort
• Payments will include incentives to achieve defined
thresholds of quality
• Penalties for unintended complications, poor outcomes,
and/or excessive variation from clinical guidelines
American Hospital Association Environmental Scan 2011
Current Realities and Emerging Visions
Current:
Acute care is the “hub of the system”
Emerging:
Primary health is the “hub of the system”
Considerations:
• Focus on prevention and wellness
• More home-based and out-patient services
• Practicing medicine outside of conventional setting
Designing & Creating “Second Curve” Healthcare Systems
Current Realities and Emerging Visions
Current:
Information is centralized and hierarchical. Physician is
supreme source of knowledge and dictator of therapy
Emerging:
Information is dispersed. All caregivers and patients have direct
access. Physician is integrator and facilitator of choices
Considerations:
• Electronic Health Records (EHR) improve care
• Workforce needs to be technologically proficient
• Care must include a “partner” mentality
Designing & Creating “Second Curve” Healthcare Systems
Current Realities and Emerging Visions
Current:
Systems, structures and processes designed to control the
people working in the system. Bosses are “in control” of
“sub-ordinates”
Emerging:
Now designed to facilitate collaboration, coordination
and teamwork. Leaders are “in service” to subordinates
Considerations:
• Workforce will need leaders who can facilitate teams,
lead by consensus; “servant leadership”
• Teamwork, collaboration and communication
increasingly important
Designing & Creating “Second Curve” Healthcare Systems
Workforce Skills
of
The Future
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Basic Skills for Tomorrow’s
Health Care Workforce
Same as today…
– Customer Service
– Problem-Solving
– Teamwork
– Critical Thinking
– Math and Science
– Reading Comprehension
– Writing Skills
– Interpersonal Communication
American Hospital Association Environmental Scan 2011
New Skills for Tomorrow’s Workforce
• Business Acumen
– Ability to manage resources (time, money,
people)
– Lean / Six Sigma
• Innovation: willingness and capacity for rapid
and continuing change
• Ability to work across generations
New Skills for Tomorrow’s Workforce
• Cultural competency
• Patient- and family-focused
• Service orientation
• Proficient in technology
• Comfortable practicing health care outside of
acute care setting
Workforce Needs of the Future
• Some roles continue to require
certificate or AD
– Sterile Processing Tech
– Surgical Tech
– Radiologic Tech
– Respiratory Therapist
– PT and OT Assistants
– Administrative and Billing Roles
Workforce Needs of the Future
• Heavy emphasis on Bachelor level and
above:
– Nurses
– Medical Technologists
– Physical Therapists
– Occupational Therapists
– Health Information Technology professionals
Suggestions for Education and Training
• Encourage youth- new generation of skills and interests match those
of the next generation of health care
• Continued focus on Basic Skills
– Heavy emphasis on math, reading, writing, customer service,
technology, and teamwork - for clinical and administrative
• Stay informed of the changes in the industry in order to steer youth
toward “in demand” jobs
• Help youth aim higher and/or focus on pathways
• Career Exploration: more options than just doctor or nurse
UMass Memorial Medical Center
Thank You!
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Generational Differences in the Health Care Industry