Peer Review Tutorial
Welcome
Welcome to the MERLOT Peer Review Tutorial.
In this tutorial, you will learn how to write a Peer
Review Report.
Peer Review Reports from at least two
reviewers are combined and the
composite peer review is posted on the
MERLOT website.
For each field in the Peer Review
Report, the tutorial will:
- outline guidelines for describing
and evaluating learning material,
- provide examples,
- and allow you to practice writing
your own Peer Review Report.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Welcome >
Peer Review Tutorial
Navigating the Tutorial
Navigating the Tutorial
To navigate through the tutorial, use the Next
button in the lower right corner.
Next
Previous
Occasionally, you will find links to websites
outside of this tutorial. To get back to the
tutorial, simply close the browser window
that opens. The tutorial should be visible
again once the browser is closed.
Menu
Quit
Use the Next button to navigate
sequentially through the tutorial.
Use the Previous button to go
back one page.
Use the Menu button to go to a
list of sections in the tutorial.
From the Menu, you may link to
any section of the tutorial.
Use the Quit button to Exit the
tutorial. Save your work before
exiting PowerPoint.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Welcome >
Peer Review Tutorial
Saving Your Work
Throughout this tutorial, you will be
asked to write your own peer review,
one field at a time. You will type each
field in a text box. Your text can then be
saved and emailed to your Editor.
In order to save your work, follow the
instructions provided in the box to the
right.
If you want to take a break and return to
the tutorial at another time, remember to
save before you exit.
Saving Your Work
1. Use the Quit button to exit the
tutorial. Click “Yes” when asked if
you are sure you want to quit.
2. Save the PowerPoint with your
responses using a new file name
(include your name in the file name;
e.g., “jsmithtutorial.ppt”).
3. Exit the PowerPoint. To restart the
tutorial where you left off, open the
new file, and use the menu to find
where you left off.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Menu of the Peer Review Tutorial
Peer Review Tutorial
Welcome
Navigating this tutorial
Saving your work
What is a Peer Review report?
First section of the Peer Review: Description
1. Overview : an abstract of the learning material
2. Learning Goal(s) : what the learner will accomplish
3. Target Student Population : who learns from learning material
4. Prerequisite Knowledge : knowledge or skill a learner needs to use the learning material
5. Type of Material : one of nine categories of MERLOT learning materials
6. Recommended Use(s) : a purpose the learning material may be used
7. Technical Requirements : the technical specifications for using the learning material
Second section of the Peer Review: Evaluations and Observations
1. Quality of Content : validity and significance of the learning material
2. Potential Effectiveness as a Teaching/Learning Tool : likelihood of enhancing teaching/ learning
3. Ease of Use : ease in which students interact with the learning material
To start the tutorial, click Next.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Peer Review Tutorial
What is a Peer Review Report?
What is a Peer Review Report?
Peer Reviews posted on the MERLOT website are
composed from reports by at least two Peer
Reviewers. The Peer Review Report is made up
of thirteen individual fields organized into two
sections. You will learn about each field in detail
in this tutorial.
The Description section provides the pedagogical
context for the learning material, such as the
learning goals, target student population, and
prerequisite knowledge.
The Evaluation and Observations section
provides the review of the teaching-learning
material, based on MERLOT’s evaluation
standards.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Peer Review Tutorial
First Section of the Peer Review: Description
Welcome to the Description section of this
tutorial.
The Description section is made up of the
following seven fields to describe the teachinglearning material:
1. Overview : an abstract of the learning material
2. Learning Goal(s) : what the learner will accomplish
3. Target Student Population : who learns from
learning material
4. Prerequisite Knowledge : knowledge or skill a
learner needs to use the learning material
5. Type of Material : one of nine categories of
MERLOT learning materials
6. Recommended Use(s) : purpose(s) for which the
learning material may be used
7. Technical Requirements : the technical
specifications for using the learning material
Click Next to begin learning about each section
of the Description.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
1. The Overview
The Overview:
The first field in a Peer Review Report is
a brief, descriptive abstract of the
teaching-learning material.
A good Overview will help the user to
decide if the material is worth further
exploration or selection.
Let’s take a closer look at how an
Overview is written…
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
1. The Overview
The Overview contains at least the following five parts:
• Type of material
• Subject matter
• Target Student Population
• Learning goals
• Features
Click here to see an animation of each part highlighted in the example below. After watching the
animation, you will have a chance to rollover each part to see the example highlighted again.
The Balloon Factory is a case study that ties together the various
business functions, including production, marketing, accounting,
and purchasing, of a real company. It includes a Teacher’s Guide
and provides many student resources, such as explanations of
business functions, virtual tours, theories, worksheets with
questions, and issues faced by the company. A glossary of terms
helps with balloon jargon. Business students can become more
aware of how real businesses function, learn to make decisions
about various fields in an organization, and apply theories, such
as supply and demand, to a real business situation.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
1. The Overview
The Overview contains at least the following five parts:
• Type of material
• Target Student Population
• Subject matter
• Learning goals
• Features
The Balloon Factory is a case study that ties together the various
business functions, including production, marketing, accounting,
and purchasing, of a real company. It includes a Teacher’s Guide
and provides many student resources, such as explanations of
business functions, virtual tours, theories, worksheets with
questions, and issues faced by the company. A glossary of terms
helps with balloon jargon. Business students can become more
aware of how real businesses function, learn to make decisions
about various fields in an organization, and apply theories, such
as supply and demand, to a real business situation.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
1. The Overview
The Overview contains at least the following five parts:
• Type of material
• Target Student Population
• Subject matter
• Learning goals
• Features
The Balloon Factory is a case study that ties together the various
business functions, including production, marketing, accounting,
and purchasing, of a real company. It includes a Teacher’s Guide
and provides many student resources, such as explanations of
business functions, virtual tours, theories, worksheets with
questions, and issues faced by the company. A glossary of terms
helps with balloon jargon. Business students can become more
aware of how real businesses function, learn to make decisions
about various fields in an organization, and apply theories, such
as supply and demand, to a real business situation.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
1. The Overview
The Overview contains at least the following five parts:
• Type of material
• Target Student Population
• Subject matter
• Learning goals
• Features
The Balloon Factory is a case study that ties together the various
business functions, including production, marketing, accounting,
and purchasing, of a real company. It includes a Teacher’s Guide
and provides many student resources, such as explanations of
business functions, virtual tours, theories, worksheets with
questions, and issues faced by the company. A glossary of terms
helps with balloon jargon. Business students can become more
aware of how real businesses function, learn to make decisions
about various fields in an organization, and apply theories, such
as supply and demand, to a real business situation.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
1. The Overview
The Overview contains at least the following five parts:
• Type of material
• Target Student Population
• Subject matter
• Learning goals
• Features
The Balloon Factory is a case study that ties together the various
business functions, including production, marketing, accounting,
and purchasing, of a real company. It includes a Teacher’s Guide
and provides many student resources, such as explanations of
business functions, virtual tours, theories, worksheets with
questions, and issues faced by the company. A glossary of terms
helps with balloon jargon. Business students can become more
aware of how real businesses function, learn to make decisions
about various fields in an organization, and apply theories, such
as supply and demand, to a real business situation.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
1. The Overview
The Overview contains at least the following five parts:
• Type of material
• Target Student Population
• Subject matter
• Learning goals
• Features
The Balloon Factory is a case study that ties together the various
business functions, including production, marketing, accounting,
and purchasing, of a real company. It includes a Teacher’s Guide
and provides many student resources, such as explanations of
business functions, virtual tours, theories, worksheets with
questions, and issues faced by the company. A glossary of terms
helps with balloon jargon. Business students can become more
aware of how real businesses function, learn to make decisions
about various fields in an organization, and apply theories, such
as supply and demand, to a real business situation.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
1. The Overview
The Overview contains at least the following five parts:
• Type of material
• Target Student Population
• Subject matter
• Learning goals
• Features
Rollover each part to see the example highlighted again.
The Balloon Factory is a case study that ties together the various
business functions, including production, marketing, accounting,
and purchasing, of a real company. It includes a Teacher’s Guide
and provides many student resources, such as explanations of
business functions, virtual tours, theories, worksheets with
questions, and issues faced by the company. A glossary of terms
helps with balloon jargon. Business students can become more
aware of how real businesses function, learn to make decisions
about various fields in an organization, and apply theories, such
as supply and demand, to a real business situation.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Overview
Now it’s your turn! Write a Overview for Gas Law Program:
Click here to view Gas Law Program at
http://intro.chem.okstate.edu/1314F00/Laboratory/GLP.htm.
Spend just 10 minutes reviewing the site and drafting an overview to familiarize yourself with the
process. Later, we will provide more details and another chance to practice.
Type your Overview here:
Expert’s Overview:
The “Gas Law Program” is a simulation that demonstrates
gas laws. It allows students to vary conditions, such as
pressure, volume, molecules of gas, and temperature and
observe
the effects
on a gas
sample. your
It provides
a plot of
After
you have
written
Overview,
velocity distributions and plots relationships between
click here to compare yours to the
variables. A document is included that provides guided
activities. High School orexpert’s.
University students of Chemistry
or Physics can appreciate and understand the relationships
between gas pressure, volume, and temperature
If you wish to edit your Overview, do so now, before continuing.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
Writing the Overview
Did you notice that the overview does not include evaluative statements? The
Overview merely describes the material.
Three parts of the Overview, the Type of Material, Target Student Population, and
Learning Goals, are also found in other fields of the Description. You will learn
more about writing these other fields in future sections of this tutorial.
Two parts of the overview can not be found in other
fields of the peer review report -- the subject matter
and the features.
Subject matter refers to the key terms or topic areas
reflecting the content of the material. You can often
find this information from the home page of the
learning material.
The next page provides details about features.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
Writing the Overview
While reviewing the leaning material, take note of all the
important learning components and features.
Features might include:
 Images/graphics
 Video
 Audio
 Quizzes (with immediate feedback)
 Other Interactivity
 Learning assignments
 Teacher’s guide
 Links to related material
 Glossary of terms
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
Writing the Overview
You might also want to include other descriptions of the material in the Overview, such as:
• Reference or credit to the author, host, or sponsor of the material.
e.g., “The UC Berkeley Digital Library, sponsored by the National Science
Foundation, is a large project containing…”
• A statement describing the material as part of a series of sites or learning modules. List
the sites that follow and/or precede the material you are reviewing.
e.g., “This is the first section of a three-section tutorial.”
• Information about potential costs involved in using the module.
e.g., “This is a commercial site that requires a license fee.”
• Additional websites by the author that might be used with the module.
e.g., “This site may be used in conjunction with Molecular Genetics at
www.example.exp.”
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 1 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Overview
Now it’s your turn! Write a Overview for DNA from the Beginning:
Click here to view DNA from the Beginning at http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/.
Type your Overview here:
Expert’s Overview:
"DNA From the Beginning" is a series of tutorials covering
the major areas of genetics and heredity, DNA structure and
function, and genome organization and expression. Each
animated
tutorial
an in-depth
examination
of basic
After
youincludes
have written
your
Overview,
experimental design(s)., multiple choice questions requiring
click here to compare yours to the
interpretation of the experimental results, historical
expert’s.
photographs of researchers,
lab, and laboratory equipment
used in the experiments, audio interviews with researchers
who discuss the concept in more detail; biographies about
key scientists, as well as links to additional relevant sites.
If you wish to edit your Overview, do so now, before continuing.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 2 of 7 of the Description Section
2. Learning Goal(s)
Learning Goal(s):
The second field in the Peer Review
Report describes what the learner will
accomplish by using the learning
material.
- What knowledge or skills will the
learner gain by using the material?
- What will the learner be able to
achieve after using the material?
Let’s take a closer look at how Learning
Goals are written…
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 2 of 7 of the Description Section
2. Learning Goal(s)
Learning Goals are written from the perspective of
the student or learner.
For example…
•“The student will be able to demonstrate [skill or
skills].”
• “The student will be able to express a deeper
understanding of [theory, theories, or concepts].”
• “The student will be able to apply the [concepts]
to [real life scenarios].”
• “The student will be able to exhibit an
appreciation for [theory, art, literature, idea,
phenomena].”
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 2 of 7 of the Description Section
Writing the Learning Goal(s)
Let’s take the example of the Cameron Virtual
Balloon Factory.
This site is an extensive business case study of the
Cameron Balloons Factory. To portray the company, the
site includes interactive photographic virtual tours of the
factory, a glossary of balloon jargon, detailed
explanations and examples of business issues and staff
in the areas of production, design, accounts, and
marketing. It also offers explanations of theories,
worksheets, questions, and a teacher’s guide.
An example of a Learning Goal for the Cameron Virtual Balloon Factory:
Students will be more aware of how real businesses function, and be able
to make decisions about various fields in an organization, and apply
theories, such as supply and demand, to a real business situation.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 2 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Learning Goal(s)
Test your understanding of Learning Goals. Click on the correct response:
Which of these statements represents a Learning Goal?
The site will provide students with a better understanding of molecular genetics.
This provides material about molecular genetics.
Beginning business students will have access to glossaries and reference
material about molecular genetic
Students will be able to correctly describe mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
Explains and demonstrates mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 2 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Learning Goal(s)
Test your understanding of Learning Goals. Click on the correct response:
Which of these statements represents a Learning Goal?
The site will provide students with a better understanding of molecular genetics.
This provides material about molecular genetics.
Beginning business students will have access to glossaries and reference
material about molecular genetic
Students will be able to correctly describe mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
Explains and demonstrates mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
This statement describes what students will learn, but does not take
the students perspective. Learning goals are written from the
perspective of the student. Try Again.
To click next, you must first choose the correct answer.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 2 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Learning Goal(s)
Test your understanding of Learning Goals. Click on the correct response:
Which of these statements represents a Learning Goal?
The site will provide students with a better understanding of molecular genetics.
This provides material about molecular genetics.
Beginning business students will have access to glossaries and reference
material about molecular genetic
Students will be able to correctly describe mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
Explains and demonstrates mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
This statement describes the site, not a learning goal. Try again.
To click next, you must first choose the correct answer.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 2 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Learning Goal(s)
Test your understanding of Learning Goals. Click on the correct response:
Which of these statements represents a Learning Goal?
The site will provide students with a better understanding of molecular genetics.
This provides material about molecular genetics.
Beginning business students will have access to glossaries and reference
material about molecular genetic
Students will be able to correctly describe mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
Explains and demonstrates mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
This statement describes the site, not a learning goal. Try again.
To click next, you must first choose the correct answer.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 2 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Learning Goal(s)
Test your understanding of Learning Goals. Click on the correct response:
Which of these statements represents a Learning Goal?
The site will provide students with a better understanding of molecular genetics.
This provides material about molecular genetics.
Beginning business students will have access to glossaries and reference
material about molecular genetic
Students will be able to correctly describe mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
Explains and demonstrates mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
That is correct! This statement represents a learning goal.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 2 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Learning Goal(s)
Test your understanding of Learning Goals. Click on the correct response:
Which of these statements represents a Learning Goal?
The site will provide students with a better understanding of molecular genetics.
This provides material about molecular genetics.
Beginning business students will have access to glossaries and reference
material about molecular genetic
Students will be able to correctly describe mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
Explains and demonstrates mapping strategies in molecular genetics.
This statement describes the site, not a learning goal. Try again.
To click next, you must first choose the correct answer.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 2 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Learning Goal(s)
Now it’s your turn! Write a Learning Goal for DNA from the Beginning:
Click here to view DNA from the Beginning at http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/.
Type your Learning Goal here:
Expert’s Learning Goal:
Students will appreciate and understand the key concepts
and experiments used to derive those concepts for classical
genetics, molecular genetics and gene organization and
control.
After you have written your Learning
Goal, click here to compare yours to
the expert’s.
If you wish to edit your Learning Goal, do so now, before continuing.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 3 of 7 of the Description Section
3. Target Student Population
Target Student Population:
The third field of the Peer Review Report
describes the student population(s) for
which this material is best suited.
Let’s take a closer look at how Target
Student Populations are written…
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 3 of 7 of the Description Section
Target Student Population
The description of the Target Student
Population includes two parts:
- a discipline area (academic major, minor,
program area).
- an educational level (freshman, lower
division, upper division, etc).
For example…
•“Beginning French Language Students”
• “Intermediate to Advanced Business Students”
• “Introductory Operations Management Student ”
Additional groups of people (e.g., faculty,
special interest groups) could also be
included here.
• “Introductory through Advanced Business
Studies; Economics and Business courses ”
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 3 of 7 of the Description Section
Writing the Target Student Population
Let’s use the example of the Cameron Virtual
Balloon Factory.
As a reminder of what this site is about:
This site is an extensive business case study of the
Cameron Balloons Factory. To portray the company, the
site includes interactive photographic virtual tours of the
factory, a glossary of balloon jargon, detailed
explanations and examples of business issues and staff
in the areas of production, design, accounts, and
marketing. It also offers explanations of theories,
worksheets, questions, and a teacher’s guide.
An example of a Target Student Population for the Cameron Virtual Balloon Factory:
Introductory through Advanced Business and Economics students.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 3 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Target Student Population
Now it’s your turn! Write a Target Student Population for DNA from the Beginning:
Click here to view DNA from the Beginning at http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/.
Type your Target Student Population here:
Expert’s Target Student Population:
Undergraduate students of genetics.
After you have written your Target
Student Population, click here to
compare yours to the expert’s.
If you wish to edit your Target Student Population, do so now, before continuing.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 4 of 7 of the Description Section
4. Prerequisite Knowledge
Prerequisite Knowledge:
The fourth field describes the knowledge
or skills a learner needs prior to using
the learning object.
Let’s take a closer look at how
Prerequisite Knowledge is written…
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 4 of 7 of the Description Section
4. Prerequisite Knowledge
Describe the prerequisite academic concepts
and skills, being as general or specific as
necessary (e.g., a specific skill versus a
broad understanding of a subject).
For example…
•“One semester of Introductory Physics”
• “Background knowledge of the history of Japan”
• “Must be able to solve quadratic equation by
factoring.”
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 4 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Prerequisite Knowledge
Now it’s your turn! Write a Prerequisite Knowledge for DNA from the Beginning:
Click here to view DNA from the Beginning at http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/.
Type your Prerequisite Knowledge here:
Expert’s Prerequisite Knowledge:
None.
After you have written your
Prerequisite Knowledge, click here to
compare yours to the expert’s.
If you wish to edit your Prerequisite Knowledge, do so now, before continuing.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
5. Type of Material
Type of Material:
The fifth field gives the type of material
using nine standard MERLOT
categories.
Let’s take a look at each of the nine
categories that can be selected to
describe the learning material…
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
5. Type of Material
The nine categories used in MERLOT to
describe learning material are:
1. Simulation
2. Animation
3. Tutorial
4. Drill and Practice
5. Quiz/Test
6. Lecture/Presentation
7. Case Study
8. Collection
9. Reference Material
The following pages will describe and
provide examples of each of the nine
types of material.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description > Type of Material
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
Simulation
What is a Simulation?
A simulation involves an engine that drives the dynamics of the learning module in
accordance with specific rules and that simulates real phenomena. Users participate in an
approximation of a real or imaginary experience where their actions affect the outcome
of the activity. Users must determine and input, on their own, the initial conditions of
some dynamic scenario or set of circumstances that generate an output that is different
from, and changed by, the initial conditions.
Click on a picture to explore the example.
Gas Law Program
http://intro.chem.okstate.edu/1314F00/Laborat
ory/GLP.htm
The Ohm Zone
http://www.article19.com/shockwave/oz.htm
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description > Type of Material
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
Animation
What is an Animation?
The dynamic and visual representation of concepts, models, processes, and/or phenomena
that allows users to view, on their own, such processes in space or time. Users can
control the pace of the visual presentation and can step backwards and forwards through
the processes being viewed, but cannot determine and/or influence either initial
conditions or outcomes/results of the visual presentation.
Click on a picture to explore the example.
Well-Tempered Clavier Johann Sebastian Bach
http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/~tas3/wtc.html
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description > Type of Material
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
Tutorial
What is a Tutorial?
Sequentially organized information and activities with specific instructional objectives
structured to integrate conceptual presentation, demonstration, practice, and testing to
teach specific concepts or skills. Users navigate through electronic workbooks to study,
practice, and be tested on information designed to meet stated learning objectives.
Click on a picture to explore the example.
DNA from the Beginning
http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/
Ojala que llueva cafe
http://www.colby.edu/~bknelson/exercises/ojal
a/index.html
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description > Type of Material
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
Drill and Practice
What is a Drill and Practice?
Activities that require users to respond repeatedly to questions or stimuli presented in a
variety of sequences. These exercises allow users to practice on their own and at their
own pace and to develop the ability to reliably perform and demonstrate knowledge and
skills.
Click on a picture to explore the example.
ESL Lab
http://www.esl-lab.com/
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description > Type of Material
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
Quiz/Test
What is a Quiz/Test?
This can be any assessment device intended to measure learning.
Click on a picture to explore the example.
Functions and Graphs
http://www.math.sjsu.edu/~valdes/calc_place/f
unctions/functions_quiz.html
Netiquette
http://www.albion.com/netiquette/netiquiz.html
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description > Type of Material
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
Lecture/Presentation
What is a Lecture/Presentation?
This category includes lecture and presentation support materials such as presentation
graphics (e.g. PowerPoint slide shows), lecture notes, or audio-visual materials that are
integral to the presentation – they are not stand alone or tutorial materials.
Click on a picture to explore the example.
CDC Growth Charts
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/growthchar
ts/training/powerpoint/slides/001.htm
Biochemistry of Metabolism
http://www.rpi.edu/dept/bcbp/molbiochem/M
BWeb/mb1/MB1index.html
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description > Type of Material
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
Case Study
What is a Case Study?
Illustrates a concept or problem by using a real-life example that can be explored in depth.
Click on a picture to explore the example.
The Cameron Balloons Virtual Factory
http://www.bized.ac.uk/virtual/cb/
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description > Type of Material
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
Collection
What is a Collection?
A collection of subject-specific materials; for example, a collection of web sites, images,
or applets.
Click on a picture to explore the example.
Physlets
http://webphysics.davidson.edu/Applets/Apple
ts.html
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description > Type of Material
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 5 of 7 of the Description Section
Reference Material
What is a Reference Material?
Material similar to that found in the reference area of a library. This can include subject
specific directories to other sites, texts, or general information. The material here has no
specific instructional objectives or learning goals.
Click on a picture to explore the example.
The WebQuest Page
http://webquest.sdsu.edu/
Who Killed William Robinson?
http://web.uvic.ca/history-robinson/
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 6 of 7 of the Description Section
6. Recommended Use(s)
Recommended Use(s):
The sixth field describes how to use the
site, or for what purpose the site can be
used.
Let’s take a closer look at how
Recommended Uses are written…
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 6 of 7 of the Description Section
6. Recommended Use(s)
Describe how you would (or how you already
do) use the material in your course.
• Is it useful for
– In-class presentations?
– At-home or group assignments?
– Reference material or study-aid?
• Should the learning material be used in
conjunction with a course, lesson, textbook,
reference material, or other supplemental
material?
• Do you have a specific assignment you
would like to recommend?
For example…
• “This site is useful as a reference material for
students.”
• “Great for independent study.”
• “It is recommended to provide students with close
instruction, due to the simulation being easily
misunderstood.”
• “Have students take the self-assessment and
describe their own learning style, sharing with a
group.”
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 6 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Recommended Use(s)
Now it’s your turn! Write a Recommended Use for DNA from the Beginning:
Click here to view DNA from the Beginning at http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/.
Type your Recommended Use here:
Expert’s Recommended Use:
This site is great for independent study or to be
used as a resource for papers or groups projects.
After you have written your
Recommended Use, click here to
compare yours to the expert’s.
If you wish to edit your Recommended Use, do so now, before continuing.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 7 of 7 of the Description Section
7. Technical Requirements
Technical Requirements:
The seventh field describes the technical
specifications (hardware, software,
network) necessary to use the learning
material.
Let’s take a closer look at how Technical
Requirements are written…
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 7 of 7 of the Description Section
7. Technical Requirements
Technical Requirements include:
• Specific browser (e.g., “Best if viewed using Explorer”)
• Specific browser versions (e.g., “Must use Explorer 5.0 or
greater, or Netscape 4.70 or greater.”)
• Specific operating system (e.g., “Windows XP/2000/98,” or
“Not available for the Mac”)
• Specific display or other settings (e.g., “Display should be set at
800 x 600”)
• Specific plug-ins or other software requirements (e.g., “Must
have Shockwave. Download Available at site” Or “Need
Adobe Acrobat Reader to view”)
• Hardware requirements (e.g., “Need sound card and speakers to
hear audio.” Or “Need a printer to use assignments.”)
• Specific network or Internet access speed (e.g., “Must connect
with a 56K Modem or better.”)
• Java and Java-Script (e.g., “Java and Java-Script must be
enabled on browser.”)
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 7 of 7 of the Description Section
Writing the Technical Requirements
Technical Requirements include:
Notice that Technical Requirements
does not include:
- Technical skills of the user.
- Technical glitches or bugs.
- Technical usability issues, such as
slow response time.
• Specific browser
• Specific browser versions
• Specific operating system
• Specific display or other settings
• Specific plug-ins or other software
requirements
• Hardware requirements
• Specific network or Internet access
speed
• Java and Java-Script
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 7 of 7 of the Description Section
Writing the Technical Requirements
Sometimes technical requirements
are listed on the site. If so, simply
repeat those listed in this field.
Questions to ask yourself when listing
Technical Requirements:
• Is sound required? – Specify “Audio
Capability required”
• Is it a Java Applet? –Specify “Java
enabled browser”
If specifics are not listed on site, use
the questions and guidelines in the
box to the right to help you write the
requirements…
• Requires disc space (to download
features of the site)? –Specify how
much space is required.
• Requires plug-in or software? –Be as
specific as you can. (popular ones
include: Shockwave, Windows Media
Player, Real Player, Quicktime, Flash,
Adobe Acrobat Reader)
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Description >
Peer Review Tutorial
Field 6 of 7 of the Description Section
Practice Writing the Technical Requirements
Now it’s your turn! Write a Technical Requirements for DNA from the Beginning:
Click here to view DNA from the Beginning at http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/.
Type your Recommended Use here:
Expert’s Recommended Use:
Flash Player from Macromedia and Real Player,
and Java-script must be enabled.
After you have written your Technical
Requirements, click here to compare
yours to the expert’s.
If you wish to edit your Technical Requirements, do so now, before continuing.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Peer Review Tutorial
You have Completed the Description section.
Congratulations. You have completed the
Description section of this tutorial.
You have one more section to go.
This may be a good time to take a break. Remember to save your
work before exiting PowerPoint.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Peer Review Tutorial
Second Section of the Peer Review: The
Evaluations and Observations
Welcome to the Evaluations and Observations
section of this tutorial.
The Evaluations and Observations section provides
an evaluation of the strengths and concerns of the
teaching-learning material using 3 evaluation
standards:
1. Quality of Content : validity and significance of the
learning material
2. Potential Effectiveness as a Teaching/Learning Tool :
likelihood of enhancing teaching/ learning
3. Ease of Use : ease in which students interact with the
learning material
Click Next to begin learning about each section
of the Evaluations and Observations.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 1 of 3
1. Quality of Content
Quality of Content:
The first evaluation standard describes
two general elements about the content
of the material:
a. validity: Is the content valid,
accurate, and reliable?
b. significance: Does the content teach
important, valuable, or
educationally significant
concepts, models, or skills in
the discipline?
Let’s take a closer look at how Quality of
Content is written…
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 1 of 3
1. Quality of Content
a. Validity may be reflected in
several ways…
i. Does it accurately depict reality?
ii. Is it valid compared to convention
or other resources?
iii. Is the content complete in scope
without missing important and
relevant information?
iv. Is the content current and up-todate?
v. Is the accuracy consistent
throughout the material?
vi. If the site contains links to other
resources, are these resources
valid?
For example…
The Cameron Virtual Balloon Factory
provides details of business
concepts that are:
• Consistently accurate,
• Consistent with today’s textbooks
and theories, and uses a case study
typical of business policy cases,
• Complete in scope, covering many
theories for each aspect of the
business,
• and up-to-date with current business
practices.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 1 of 3
1. Quality of Content
b. Significance may be reflected in
several ways…
i. Does the content cover core
curriculum within the discipline?
ii. Is the content a pre-requisite for
understanding more advanced
material in the discipline?
iii. Does the content cover material
that is difficult to teach/learn?
iv. Is the significance consistent
throughout the material?
v. If the site contains links to other
resources, are these resources
appropriate?
For example…
The Cameron Virtual Balloon
Factory…:
• is a comprehensive resource
integrating a great variety of
business functions, raising both
general and specific issues,
• covers significant theories that are
well integrated, and covered with
enough depth to be useful for either
introductory or advanced students,
• provides a close, in-depth look,
difficult to find elsewhere, at an
actual business case, complete with
interactive virtual tours of the
location and examples of real issues
and real people.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 1 of 3
Writing the Quality of Content
Strengths and Concerns
There are two different sections of the
Quality of Content - providing the
Strengths and providing the
Concerns.
Use “bullets” to list out for each of
strengths and concerns.
If there are no concerns for this
standard, write “none” in the field.
You MUST have something in the
Concerns area unless you award a
rating of 5 stars.
For example…
Quality of Content
Strengths: This learning material
provides details of business
concepts that are:
• Consistently accurate,
• Consistent with today’s textbooks
and theories, and uses a case study
typical of business policy cases,
• Complete in scope, covering many
theories for each aspect of the
business, …
Concerns:
• This site does not cover a complete
range of business functions.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 1 of 3
Practice Writing the Quality of Content
Now it’s your turn! Write Strengths and Concerns for the Quality of Content for DNA
from the Beginning:
Click here to view DNA from the Beginning at http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/.
Type your Quality of Content here:
Strengths:
Concerns:
Expert’s Quality of Content:
Strengths: DNA from the Beginning provides information
about genetics, heredity, and DNA structure that is:
• Consistently accurate with appropriate vocabulary,
• Consistent with today’s textbooks and theories,
• An impressive depth of coverage, covering many
concepts, scientists, labs, and links to relevant sites,
• Significant
and follows
a logical progression
of ideas.
After you
have written
your Quality
of
Content Strengths and Concerns, click
Concerns: Some units, particularly in Classical Genetics,
here
to the expert’s.
have
only to
onecompare
or no videoyours
interviews.
If you wish to edit your Quality of Content, do so now, before continuing.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 2 of 3
2. Potential Effectiveness
Potential Effectiveness as a
Teaching/Learning Tool:
The second evaluation standard describes
the materials likely ability to improve
teaching and learning given the ways
faculty and students could use the
material.
Let’s take a closer look at how Potential
Effectiveness is written…
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 2 of 3
2. Potential Effectiveness
Potential Effectiveness may be
reflected in several ways…
For example…
i. Does the material facilitate learning?
Will learners be able to effectively
achieve the learning goals?
ii. Are concepts, models, or skills
presented with clarity, focus, and
organization?
iii. Compared to other methods of
teaching the same concept, models,
or skills, is this learning material
just as effective or better? Is it an
innovative, new, original
presentation of the concept?
continued…
The Cameron Virtual Balloon
Factory…:
• is effective at teaching business
students how real businesses
function, how to make decisions
about various fields in an
organization, and apply business
theory,
• covers a lot of ground, while
keeping it’s focus and staying well
organized,
• presents a typical business case in
creative, innovative fashion,
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 2 of 3
2. Potential Effectiveness
iv. Does it appeal to multiple learning
styles? Multiple learning
processes?
v. Does it engage the learner, create
intrigue, or otherwise motivate the
learner to achieve?
vi. Does it engage multiple senses
through audio, video, images, and
text?
vii. If it is interactive, does it do so
effectively?
viii. If it is interactive, does it provide
immediate feedback regarding the
learner’s response accuracy?
continued…
For example…
The Cameron Virtual Balloon
Factory…:
• appeals to many learning styles,
with options to jump right into
descriptions of the business,
explanations of theory, or spend
time in virtual tours or reading
about the staff,
• engages students with interactive
pictures, activities, and interesting
stories,
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 2 of 3
2. Potential Effectiveness
ix. Does it provide examples, when
appropriate, that help illustrate
concepts?
x. Does it demonstrate relationships
between concepts?
xi. Does it provide effective
introductions, overviews and
summaries when applicable?
xii. Does it have flexibility or
versatility of use?
For example…
The Cameron Virtual Balloon
Factory…:
• is very flexible, so learning
assignments may be as narrow
focused or as extensive as required.
It can easily be adapted to a specific
course by focusing on a specific
section.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 2 of 3
Writing the Potential Effectiveness
Strengths and Concerns
There are two different sections of the
Potential Effectiveness - providing
the Strengths and providing the
Concerns.
For example…
Potential Effectiveness
Strengths: This learning material:
If there are no concerns for this
standard, write “none” in the field.
• is effective at teaching business
students how real businesses
function,
• covers a lot of ground, while
keeping it’s focus and staying well
organized,
• presents a typical business case in
creative, innovative fashion, …
You MUST have something in the
Concerns area unless you award a
rating of 5 stars.
Concerns:
• This site is not very flexible to a
variety of learning styles or
assignments.
Use “bullets” to list out for each of
strengths and concerns.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 2 of 3
Practice Writing the Potential Effectiveness
Now it’s your turn! Write Strengths and Concerns for the Potential Effectiveness for DNA
from the Beginning:
Click here to view DNA from the Beginning at http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/.
Type your Potential Effectiveness here:
Strengths:
Concerns:
Expert’s Potential Effectiveness :
Strengths: DNA from the Beginning:
• Is effective at promoting understanding of the basic concepts of
genetics, heredity and DNA structure. It presents a clear and
focused thread of logic showing how scientists realized that DNA
is the genetic material.
• Is well organized, and follows a logical progression, conceptually
and chronologically
After
youwith
have
written
your
Potential
• Engages
students
videos
of famous
scientists,
animations, and
questions,
such
as
“Where
do
we
go
from
here?”
Effectiveness Strengths and Concerns,
• Provides more than one approach to understanding the concepts
click here
to compare
yours
to theallowing
using animations,
interactive
quizzes, text,
and videos,
flexibility of use.
expert’s.
• Includes interactive quizzes that provide immediate feedback for
correct and incorrect answers.
Concerns: None.
If you wish to edit your Potential Effectiveness, do so now, before continuing.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 3 of 3
3. Ease of Use
Ease of Use:
The third evaluation standard describes
how easy it is for students and faculty to
interact with the learning material.
Let’s take a closer look at how Ease of
Use is written…
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 3 of 3
3. Ease of Use
Ease of Use may be reflected in
several ways…
For example…
i. Is information presented in ways that
are familiar to students?
ii. Is the site easy to navigate?
iii. If it is interactive, does it provide
feedback for user actions? Will the
user always know if they are
waiting for a response from the
system, or if the system is waiting a
response from the user?
iv. Is it self-contained, or are
instructions necessary? Are
instructions easily available?
continued…
The Cameron Virtual Balloon
Factory…:
• presents a case study in an
innovative display that is organized
by business functions similar to
business textbooks.
• is easy to use and easy to navigate.
Users can jump from section to
section easily without getting lost.
Even though it has a lot of material,
the way it is organized makes it
always easy to find what you are
looking for.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 3 of 3
3. Ease of Use
v. If there are instructions or “help”,
are they clear, relevant, and
complete? Are they available when
needed?
vi. If applicable, does it clearly tell
users when an error is made, and
how the user should continue?
vii. Is the presentation clearly designed
with no distracting design elements
(e.g., color, sound, animation, too
much on a page)?
viii. Are the terms and any new jargon,
defined?
continued…
For example…
The Cameron Virtual Balloon
Factory…:
• Has virtual tours that are easy to
use, without the little bit of
instruction there is on the site.
• is designed well, with wellformatted text, and just enough
images to keep it interesting.
• clearly defines all balloon jargon.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 3 of 3
3. Ease of Use
ix. Are related parts of the site clearly
related, while parts that offer
different content areas, or
audiences are clearly separated?
x. When the site requires plug-ins, does
it provide links to easily access the
plug-in for downloading?
xi. Are there any major bugs (e.g., links
that do not work)?
For example…
• The Cameron Virtual Balloon
Factory is organized clearly.
• All of the links are are functioning
properly.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 3 of 3
Writing the Ease of Use
Strengths and Concerns
For example…
There are two different sections of the
Ease of Use - providing the
Strengths and providing the
Concerns.
Ease of Use
Strengths: This learning material:
If there are no concerns for this
standard, write “none” in the field.
• presents a case study in an
innovative display that is organized
by business functions similar to
business textbooks,
• is designed well, with wellformatted text, and just enough
images to keep it interestin,
• is organized clearly, …
You MUST have something in the
Concerns area unless you award a
rating of 5 stars.
Concerns:
• Some of the links are not
functioning properly.
Use “bullets” to list out for each of
strengths and concerns.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Evaluations and Observations >
Peer Review Tutorial
Standard 3 of 3
Practice Writing the Ease of Use
Now it’s your turn! Write Strengths and Concerns for the Ease of Use for DNA from the
Beginning:
Click here to view DNA from the Beginning at http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/.
Type your Ease of Use here:
Strengths:
Expert’s Ease of Use:
Strengths:
• Information is presented logically in a simple design.
• Navigation is consistent throughout each unit of the tutorial.
• Terms are defined within the text.
Concerns:
Concerns:
• The scope of the site and how to best navigate through each unit
is not immediately clear. It takes some exploring before
After you
have
written
your
of of the
understanding
how to
best move
from one
unit,Ease
or section
unit,
to the
next. It is not
immediately
clear what
typehere
of
Use
Strengths
and
Concerns,
click
learning material is contained within each of the sections (e.g.,
to compare yours to the expert’s.
“Concept” provides a brief description, while “Animation”
provides a more in-depth tutorial).
• There is no index or site map listed by topic, making it difficult
to move directly to a topic of choice. The titles of each unit do
not always provide enough information to know what topics are
covered within the unit.
If you wish to edit your Ease of Use, do so now, before continuing.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Peer Review Tutorial
You have Completed the Tutorial.
Congratulations. You have completed the Tutorial.
Now that you have completed the tutorial, click Quit, save your
work, and email your PowerPoint file to your Editor.
Click here to see email addresses of all Editors.
Remember to save your work before exiting PowerPoint.
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Peer Review Tutorial
Email Addresses of the Editors
Biology
History
Physics
Jeff Bell
[email protected]
Scott Cooper
[email protected]
William Paquette
[email protected]
Tracy Penny Light
[email protected]
Bruce Mason
[email protected]
Business
Information Technology
Cathy Owens Swift
[email protected]
Terry Ortiz
[email protected]
Siva Balasubramanian
[email protected]
Chemistry
Nancy Konigsberg Kerner
[email protected]
Neil Kestner
[email protected]
Engineering
Joseph Tront
[email protected]
Ed Perry
[email protected]
Health Science
Pamela Scheibel
[email protected]
Mathematics
Jim Rutledge
[email protected]
Kurt Cogswell
[email protected]
Music
David Megill
[email protected]
Michael Rothkopf
[email protected]
Return to the Tutorial
Psychology
Michelle Pilati
[email protected]
Teacher Education
Darrell Pearson
[email protected]
Barbara Levin
[email protected]
Teaching and Technology
Ray C. Purdom
[email protected]
Colleen Carmean
[email protected]
World Languages
Laura Franklin
[email protected]
Carla Meskill
[email protected]
Menu
Previous
Quit
Next
Descargar

MERLOT PEer Review Tutorial