Introduction to Scripting
AE 6382
AE6382
What is a scripting



Scripting is the process of programming using a scripting
language
A scripting language, like C, Fortran, and Java, has
expressions, conditional statements, and loop
statements.
Unlike C, Fortran, and Java a scripting language has



Loose typing
Interpreted rather than compiled
Usually as some higher level abstractions or built-in functionality
AE6382
Scripting Features


Scripting languages are generally interpreted rather than
compiled
This results in slower execution times compared to a
compiled language



C and Fortran are generally fastest
Java is compiled to bytecode that runs on a virtual machine and
is slower
The implementation of each individual interpreter varies greatly
–
–

Perl, Python, and Ruby are compiled at runtime into an internal
format that increases performance
Shell scripts and MATLAB re-evaluate each statement every time
Development cycle is shortened – edit/run
AE6382
Scripting Features

Scripting languages do not, in general, use strong typing
of variables


Scripting languages frequently build into the basic
language higher order abstractions




A variable may during the course of execution contain strings,
integers, and objects
Text processing
Regular expressions
System interface mechanisms
Most scripting interpreters can be embeddedt into other
programs to provide scripting capability within that
program

Microsoft Office uses Visual Basic for Applications
AE6382
Scripting Languages



Simple command/shell scripting, level 1, is the simplest
form of scripting
Intended to provide a “batch” execution capability
Unix/Linux





bash, ksh (Korn shell), sh (Bourne shell)
csh (C shell), tsch
These shells can work interactively or in script mode
Have basic programming constructs (if, loops, …)
Windows


cmd/command have no programming constructs
Windows PowerShell (4Q2006) will have extensive scripting
based on C# language
AE6382
Scripting Languages

Limited scripting languages, level 2, have more
sophisticated language structure but are limited in their
native functionality


No native file I/O capability for example
JavaScript / Jscript / ECMAScript





Available on Unix/Linux and Windows
C based syntax
Used almost exclusively as the client-side scripting language in
the various web browsers
Can be used as a system scripting language in Windows via the
Windows Scripting Host
Not generally used in Unix/Linux for general purpose scripting
–
–
SpiderMonkey is C based JS interpreter
Rhino is Java based JS interpreter
AE6382
Scripting Languages

VBScript




Available only on Windows, based on Visual Basic for
Applications (VBA)
Can be used as the client-side scripting language in Internet
Explorer
Most often used with Windows Active Server Pages (ASP) for IIS
based web sites
Can be used as a system scripting language in Windows via the
Windows Scripting Host
AE6382
Scripting Languages


Full scripting languages, level 3, have a sophisticated
language structure and extensive application support
Perl – Practical Extraction and Reporting Language






A procedure based language with support for objects
Extensive text processing capabilities and regular expressions
Extensible using modules
C based syntax with plethora of symbols
Developed in late 1980’s
Python (also Jython)




An object oriented language with some procedure traits
Extensible
A format based syntax
Developed in early 1990’s
AE6382
Scripting Languages

Ruby





An object oriented language
Extensible
C like syntax with minimal symbols (no {} () …)
Developed in early 1990’s
TCL – Tool Command Language





A procedural language
Extensible
A stack evaluation syntax, similar to Lisp (lots of [])
Developed as an embeddable scripting language
Developed in late 1980’s
AE6382
Scripting Languages

Other niche scripting languages

BeanShell
–

Makes it possible to use Java as a scripting language
REXX
–
C-like, objects, cross-platform, has a Java version
AE6382
Perl



General purpose scripting language – Practical
Extraction and Reporting Language
Based on the Unix program awk in its early incarnation
Runs everywhere



On Unix/Linux it runs standalone using #! script file convention
On Windows it can run standalone or as an ActiveX scripting
engine
Pros





Extensive text processing capabilities including built-in regular
expressions
Can be easily extended, there is extensive support for all types
of system programming
Has syntax to support object based programming
Most Unix system calls are built-in functions
The built-in system calls will do the right thing in Windows
AE6382
Perl

Cons



Can be difficult for beginners to learn
Variable naming scheme is initially confusing
There is a high learning curve
AE6382
Perl

Has 3 classes of variables











$var
@var
%var
-
scalar (integer, real, string, ...)
array of scalars, $var[0]
hash of scalars, $var{key}
Has local, lexical, and global scoping of variables
Namespace separation
Objects and references are supported
Has the same set of operators as C plus some
Lexical and global scoping of variables
Statements end with ;
Comments are everything after # on a line
Functions sub name { ... }
AE6382
Perl




Has the same set of operators as C plus some additional
Statements end with ; (semi-colon)
Comments are everything after # on a line
The usual complement of conditional statements


The usual loop statements




if – then – else (also unless – then – else)
for
for each
while
Functions and methods are defined similarly

sub name (…) { … }
AE6382
Perl

Loop statements
for ($i=0 ; $i < 10 ; $i++) {
printf “i=%4d\n”,$i;
}
while (<STDIN>) {
print;
}
@list = (0,5,8,12);
foreach $value (@list) {
print “Value=$value\n”;
}
foreach $value (0,5,8,12) {
print “Value=$value\n”;
}
%hash = (part1=>0,part3=>70,part2=>4);
foreach $key (sort keys %hash) {
print “Value=$hash{$key}\n”;
}
AE6382
Perl

Logical statements
if ($i == 1) {
print “i=$i\n”;
$i++;
}
unless ($i == 1) {
print “Error: i != 1\n”;
$i++;
}
die “Unable to open file” if !open(IN,”filename”);
if ($i == 1) {
print “Group 1\n”;
} else {
print “Unknown group\n”;
}
if ($i == 1) {
print “Group 1\n”;
} elsif ($i == 2) {
print “Group 2\n”;
} elsif ($i == 3) {
print “Group 3\n”;
} else {
print “Unknown group\n”;
}
AE6382
Perl

Native Regular Expression Support
while (<>) {
next if m/.*error.*/;
print;
}
foreach $line (@lines) {
next if $line =~ m/^#/;
@values = ($line =~ m/.+a=([0-9]+).+c=([0-9]+)/);
print “$values[0] $values[1]\n”;
}
@lines contains (an array of strings):
# a
b
c
a=10
b=23
c=16
a=12
b=43
c=17
a=63,
b=2,
c=999
AE6382
Perl

Support for objects





use Modulename;
$var = Modulename::new();
$var->method(...);
$var->{property};
(include class definition)
(instantiate object)
(invoke method)
(access property)
Does not have a class keyword, a class is defined as a
Perl module where the functions are invoked as methods
and the use of the bless keyword.
AE6382
M/S Scripting Documentation


Script56.chm is the Windows scripting
documentation file
Local copy
http://www.ae.gatech.edu/classes/ae6
382/MS_scripting/
AE6382
JavaScript / JScript



General purpose scripting language
Usually appears only in web browsers
Available on most platforms


Pros



In Windows Jscript is available as an ActiveX scripting engine,
when run under the Windows Scripting Host it can functions as a
general scripting system
Its syntax is very much like C
It has support for objects
Cons


Limited availability
Has limited access to host system (security feature)
AE6382
JavaScript / JScript

Variables







Typeless, refer to primitive types and objects
Can be arrays
Declared with var statement
Uses the usual set of C operators with some additions
Statements are terminated with ;
Comments marked with // and /* ... */
Functions and methods are declared with function
name (...) { ... }
AE6382
JavaScript / JScript

Loop statements
var stdout = WScript.StdOut;
var i;
for (i=0 ; i < 10 ; i++) {
stdout.WriteLine(“i=“+i);
}
var stdout = WScript.StdOut;
var stdin = WScript.StdIn;
while (! stdin.AtEndOfStream)
{
line = stdin.ReadLine()
stdout.WriteLine(line);
}
var stdout = WScript.StdOut;
var array = new Array(3);
array[0] = 2;
array[1] = 12;
array[2] = 70;
for (var value in array) {
stdout.WriteLine("Value: "+array[value]);
}
AE6382
JavaScript / JScript

Logical statements
if (i == 5) {
stdout.WriteLine(“Equality failed);
}
if (i == 1) {
stdout.WriteLine(“Group 1”);
} else {
stdout.WriteLine(“Unknown group”);
}
if (i == 1) {
stdout.WriteLine(“Group 1”);
} else if (i == 2) {
stdout.WriteLine(“Group 2”);
} else if (i == 3) {
stdout.WriteLine(“Group 3”);
} else {
stdout.WriteLine(“Unknown group”);
}
AE6382
JavaScript / JScript

Regular Expression Support
var stdout = WScript.StdOut;
var stdin = WScript.StdIn;
var re = new RegExp(".*error.*","i");
while (! stdin.AtEndOfStream) {
var line = stdin.ReadLine();
if (line.match(re)) {
stdout.WriteLine(line);
}
}
AE6382
JavaScript / JScript

Regular Expression Support
var stdout = WScript.StdOut;
var stdin = WScript.StdIn;
var re1 = new RegExp("^#","i");
var re2 = new RegExp(".+a=([0-9]+).+c=([0-9]+)");
var lines = new Array(4);
lines[0] = "# a
b
c";
lines[1] = " a=10
b=23
c=16";
lines[2] = " a=12 b=43
c=17";
lines[3] = " a=63,
b=2,
c=999";
for (var line in lines) {
stdout.WriteLine(lines[line]);
if (lines[line].match(re1))
continue;
re2.exec(lines[line]);
var avalue = RegExp.$1;
var cvalue = RegExp.$2;
stdout.WriteLine(avalue+", "+cvalue);
}
// lines contains (an array of strings):
// # a
b
c
//
a=10
b=23
c=16
//
a=12
b=43
c=17
//
a=63,
b=2,
c=999
AE6382
JavaScript / JScript

Object support




var obj = new Object();
obj.method(...);
obj.property;
obj[“property”];
(instantiate object)
(invoke method)
(access property)
(access property)
AE6382
M/S Scripting Documentation


Script56.chm is the Windows scripting
documentation file
Local copy
http://www.ae.gatech.edu/classes/ae6
382/MS_scripting/
AE6382
VBScript


General purpose scripting language
Only available on Windows



Pros



Available as an ActiveX scripting engine, when run under the
Windows Scripting Host it has general usage
Can be used as the client-side scripting in IE
Simple syntax (Basic)
Has support for objects
Cons

Windows only
AE6382
VBScript

Variables







Typeless, refer to primitive types and objects
Can be arrays
Declared with Dim statement
Uses a small subset of C operators
Statements are terminated by the end of line
Comments marked with ‘ (single quote character)
Subroutines Sub name
AE6382
VBScript

Loop statements
Dim i
i = 0
For i=0 To 9 Step 1
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine "i=" & i
Next
Do While Not WScript.StdIn.AtEndOfStream
Dim line
line = WScript.StdIn.ReadLine()
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine(line)
Loop
Dim d
Set d
d.Add
d.Add
d.Add
Do Until WScript.StdIn.AtEndOfStream
Dim line
line = WScript.StdIn.ReadLine()
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine(line)
Loop
'Create a variable
= CreateObject("Scripting.Dictionary")
"0", "Athens"
'Add some keys and items
"1", "Belgrade"
"2", "Cairo"
For Each I in d
Document.frmForm.Elements(I).Value = D.Item(I)
Next
AE6382
VBScript

Logical statements
If i = 5 Then
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine “Value is “ & i
End If
If i = 1 Then
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine“Group 1”
Else
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine “Unknown group”
End If
If i = 1 Then
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine
ElseIf i = 2 Then
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine
ElseIf i = 3 Then
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine
Else
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine
End If
“Group 1”
“Group 2”
“Group 3”
“Unknown group”
AE6382
VBScript

Regular Expression Support
Dim re
Set re = New RegExp
re.Pattern = ".*error.*"
re.IgnoreCase = True
Do While Not WScript.StdIn.AtEndOfStream
Dim line
line = WScript.StdIn.Readline
If re.Test(line) Then
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine line
End If
Loop
AE6382
VBScript

Regular Expression Support
Dim line
Dim i
Dim match
Dim re1, re2, matches, submatches
Dim lines(4)
lines(0) = "# a
b
c"
lines(1) = " a=10
b=23
c=16"
lines(2) = " a=12 b=43
c=17"
lines(3) = " a=63,
b=2,
c=999"
set re1 = New RegExp
set re2 = New RegExp
re1.Pattern = "^#"
re2.Pattern = ".+a=([0-9]+).+c=([0-9]+)"
For i=0 To 3
line = lines(i)
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine "--> " & line
If Not re1.Test(line) Then
' WScript.StdOut.WriteLine line
Set matches = re2.Execute(line)
Set match = matches(0)
WScript.StdOut.WriteLine match.SubMatches(0) & ", " & match.SubMatches(1)
End If
Next
' lines contains (an array of strings):
' # a
b
c
'
a=10
b=23
c=16
'
a=12
b=43
c=17
'
a=63,
b=2,
c=999
AE6382
VBScript

Object support



Set obj = New Object
obj.method(...)
obj.property
(instantiate object)
(invoke method)
(access property)
AE6382
Tcl


General purpose scripting language
Available on most platforms


Pros




In Windows it can run standalone an is also available as an
ActiveX scripting engine
Interpreter has a small footprint
Easily embedded
Extensible using C
Cons

Strange syntax
AE6382
Tcl

Variables







Strings are the basic type
Can create lists and arrays
Uses the expr command to evaluate expressions
Format cmd op op ... op
set var value (set counter 5)
Reference value: $counter (set i $counter)
Use [ ... ] to evaluate immediately
AE6382
Tcl

Loop statements
for (set i 0} {$i < 10} {incr i 3} {
lappend aList $i
}
set aList
set i 1
while {$i <= 10} {
set product [expr $product * $i]
incr i
}
set product
set i 1
foreach value {1 3 5 7 11 13 17 19 23} {
set i [expr $i * $value]
}
set i
foreach x [list $a $b [foo]] {
puts stdout “x = $x”
}
AE6382
Tcl

Logical statements
if {$i == 5} {
puts stdout “Equality failed”
}
if {i == 1} {
puts stdout “Group 1”
} else {
puts stdout “Unknown group”
}
if {i ==
puts
} elseif
puts
} elseif
puts
} else {
puts
}
1} {
tdout “Group 1”
(i == 2) {
tdout “Group 2”
(i == 3) {
stdout “Group 3”
stdout “Unknown group”
AE6382
Tcl

Logical statements
if {$x == 0} {
puts stderr “Divide by zero”
if (i == 1) {
stdout.WriteLine(“Group 1”);
} else {
stdout.WriteLine(“Unknown group)”;
}
if (i == 1) {
stdout.WriteLine(“Group 1”);
} else if (i == 2) {
stdout.WriteLine(“Group 2”);
} else if (i == 3) {
stdout.WriteLine(“Group 3”);
} else {
stdout.WriteLine(“Unknown group”);
}
AE6382
Python


General purpose scripting language
Available on most platforms




Designed from the start as an object oriented language
Pros



On Unix/Linux it runs standalone using #! script file convention
In Windows it can run standalone an is also available as an
ActiveX scripting engine
Has wide support and runs everywhere
Jython is a version coded in Java and can access Java classes
directly
Cons

Has a syntax based on formatting
AE6382
Python

Variables








Typeless
Scalar
Lists
Tuples
Dictionaries
name = “sam”
names = [“sam”, “bill”, “ted”]
(1,2,5,20)
rooms = {“sam”:302,”bill”:305,”ted”:401}
Namespace separation (packages)
Block structure is indicated by spacing
Strings are immutable
AE6382
Python

Loop statements
Count = 0
for line in range(0..10):
count = count + 1
print count
Count = 10
While count < 10:
count = count +
1
AE6382
Python

Conditional statements
Value = 2
if value%2 == 0:
print “Value is even”
else:
print “Value is odd”
AE6382
Python

Object support

Class definition
class Special:
def __init__(self):
self.count = 0
def method1(self,…):
…
def method2(self,…):
…

Object instantiation
–

obj = Special()
Method invocation
–
obj.method1(…)
AE6382
Ruby


General purpose scripting language
Available on most platforms



Designed from the start as an object oriented language
Pros



On Unix/Linux it runs standalone using #! script file convention
Is becoming widely used
Has a more conventional syntax without the clutter of C and Perl
Cons

Is relatively new on scene
AE6382
Ruby

Variables






Types of variables




Typeless
$global_variable
@@class_variable
@instance_variable
local_variable
Scalar
Arrays
Hashes
rooms{“sam}
name = “sam”
names = [“sam”, “bill”, “ted”], names[2]
rooms = {“sam”:302,”bill”:305,”ted”:401},
Namespace separation
AE6382
Ruby

Loop statements
count = 1
while count < 10
count = count + 1
end
count = 1
until count == 10
count = count + 1
end
count = 1
begin
count = count + 1
end while count < 10
count = 1
begin
count = count + 1
end until count == 10
loop
count = count + 1
end
AE6382
Ruby

Conditional statements
value = 6
if value%3 == 0
print “remainder 0”
elsif value%3 == 1
print “remainder 1”
else
print “remainder 2”
end
value = 6
unless value == 6
print “value is not 6
end
print “stop” if value == 0
AE6382
Ruby

Object support

Class definition
class
def
…
end
def
…
end
def
…
end
end

method1(…)
method2(…)
Object instantiation
–

special
initialize
obj = special.new
Method invocation
–
obj.method1(…)
AE6382
Scripting in Unix

The usual method of executing a script in Unix/Linux is
to include the location of the interpreter on line 1



#!/usr/bin/perl
#!/usr/bin/sh
The script must be readable and executable by the user
attempting to run it
AE6382
Scripting in Windows

The usual method of executing a script in windows is to
associate a file extension with the interpreter




file.pl
file.py
file.cmd
Perl script
Python script
Command file
Alternate methods are used for scripts that are to be run
by resident ActiveX scripting engines




wscript
cscript
wsf – Windows Scripting File
hta – HTML Applications
AE6382
M/S Scripting Documentation


Script56.chm is the Windows scripting
documentation file
Local copy
http://www.ae.gatech.edu/classes/ae6
382/MS_scripting/
AE6382
Scripting in Windows

sample1.js

execute from cmd prompt> cscript sample1.js
// Get the stdin and stdout descriptors
// The WScript object is created automatically by WSH
var stdin = WScript.StdIn; // properties
var stdout = WScript.StdOut;
// Get the value to pass to program
stdout.WriteLine("Enter value for i: ");
var i = stdin.ReadLine();
stdout.WriteLine("Enter value for j: ");
var j = stdin.ReadLine();
// Create an instance of the WshShell object (COM object)
var WshShell = new ActiveXObject("WScript.Shell");
// Run with access to programs I/O
var WshScriptExec = WshShell.Exec("program1");
// Write to the running programs stdio
WshScriptExec.StdIn.WriteLine(" "+i+" "+j);
// Wait for the running program to exit
while (WshScriptExec.Status != 1) {
;
}
// Read from the running programs stdout
var output = WshScriptExec.StdOut.ReadLine();
stdout.WriteLine("Output from program: "+output);
AE6382
Scripting in Windows

sample1.wsf

execute from cmd prompt> sample1.wsf
<job id="sample1">
<script language="JScript">
// Get the stdin and stdout descriptors
// The WScript object is created automatically by WSH
var stdin = WScript.StdIo; // properties
var stdout = WScript.StdOut;
// Get the value to pass to program
stdout.WriteLine("Enter value for i: ");
var i = stdin.ReadLine();
stdout.WriteLine("Enter value for j: ");
var j = stdin.ReadLine();
// Create an instance of the WshShell object (COM object)
var WshShell = new ActiveXObject("WScript.Shell");
// Run with access to programs I/O
var WshScriptExec = WshShell.Exec("program1");
// Write to the running programs stdio
WshScriptExec.StdIn.WriteLine(" "+i+" "+j);
// Wait for the running program to exit
while (WshScriptExec.Status != 1) {
;
}
// Read from the running programs stdout
var output = WshScriptExec.StdOut.ReadLine();
stdout.WriteLine("Output from program: "+output);
</script>
</job>
AE6382
Windows Scripting Host



WSH is the context within which VBScript and JScript
run
PerlScript and PythonScript are also available
Start WSH scripts using cscript or wscript



cscript - console mode
wscript - windows mode, no stdin, stdout, or stderr
The WSF format can contain several scripts in one text
file
AE6382
Component Object Model COM





Why use COM
The Component Object Model (COM) is the key to
making full use of Windows
COM is accessible from C++ and scripting
Scripting an application is called automation
Also referred to as ActiveX and OLE
AE6382
Objects in COM

A class defines an object



Properties are variables
Methods are functions
When a class is instantiated an object is created


Each object has its own copy of the properties
When a method is invoked it operates on only the object that is
the target of the invocation
AE6382
Objects in COM




An application can make many classes available for use
via COM
The client code (a script for example) must create an
instance of the class (an object) and save a reference in
a variable
The application’s methods may then be invoked on that
object to access the application
Using Windows Script Components (see Script56.CHM)
scripts can be made available to other COM clients via
COM
AE6382
Objects in COM

Two methods for accessing COM




vtables – C/C++
Dispatch – scripts
Classes contain properties and methods
Collections are classes that enumerate objects
Dim worksheets, worksheet, excel
...
Set worksheet = excel.Worksheets(“sheet1”)
...
Set worksheet = excel.Worksheets(2)
...
‘ excel is an instance of Excel.Application
‘ worksheet is an instance of Worksheet class
‘
‘ implied Item method
‘ Set worksheet = excel.Worksheets.Item(2)
AE6382
Creating a COM Object Instance

Scripting languages have a mechanism for instantiating
a COM class
Perl:
use Win32::OLE;
...
my $excel = Win32::OLE->new(‘Excel.Application’);
JScript:
var excel = new ActiveXObject(“Excel.Application”);
VBScript:
Dim excel
Set excel = CreateObject(“Excel.Application”);
Python:
import win32com.client
...
excel = win32com.client.Dispath(“Excel.Application”);
AE6382
Creating a COM Object Instance


Once top level object has been created the remaining
hierarchy is accessed as per the language’s normal
object mechanism
Tcl and Ruby can also instantiate COM objects
AE6382
Object Models



Every COM enabled Windows application has an object
model
Requires knowledge of object model to access
application
Discovering the object model


Use documentation (Office is documented)
Use an object browser and trial and error
–
–
ActiveState Perl includes a simple Object Browser
Visual Studio include an Object Browser
AE6382
Example - Perl
#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use
use
use
use
Win32::OLE qw(in with);
Win32::OLE::Const 'Microsoft Excel';
Win32::OLE::Variant;
Win32::OLE::NLS qw(:LOCALE :DATE);
# Program dies on errors
$Win32::OLE::Warn = 3;
# The use of ' rather than " is noted
my $excel_file = 'c:\latham\ae8801d\perltut.xls';
# Create a connection to Excel
# Try to use an existing object else create a new object
my $Excel = Win32::OLE->GetActiveObject('Excel.Application')
|| Win32::OLE->new('Excel.Application','Quit');
print "ERROR: ",$Win32::OLE::LastError,"\n" if $Win32::OLE::LastError;
# Turn off any alter boxes (such as the SaveAs response)
$Excel->{DisplayAlerts} = 0;
# Make Excel visible on the desktop
$Excel->{Visible} = 1;
# Add a workbook and save the file
my $Book = $Excel->Workbooks->Add();
$Book->SaveAs($excel_file);
# To open an existing file replace above with
# my $Book = $Excel->Workbooks->Open($excel_file);
AE6382
Example – Perl
# Create a reference to a worksheet
my $Sheet = $Book->Worksheets('Sheet1');
$Sheet->Activate();
$Sheet->{Name} = "sample_sheet";
# Insert some data into the worksheet
my ($mday,$mon,$year) = (localtime(time))[3,4,5];
$year += 1900;
my $str = $mon.'/'.$mday.'/'.$year;
$Sheet->Range("a1")->{Value} = $str;
$Sheet->Range("c1")->{Value} = "This is a long piece of text";
# Save
$Book->SaveAs($excel_file);
# Set cell colors via a loop
foreach my $y (1..56) {
my $range = 'b'.$y;
$Sheet->Range($range)->Interior->{ColorIndex} = $y;
$Sheet->Range($range)->{Value} = $y
}
# Re-format existing cell
my $range = 'A1';
$Sheet->Range($range)->Interior->{ColorIndex} = 27;
$Sheet->Range($range)->Font->{FontStyle} = "Bold";
$Sheet->Range($range)->{HorizontalAlignment} = xlHAlignCenter;
# Set column widths
my @columnheaders = qw(A:B);
foreach my $range (@columnheaders) {
$Sheet->Columns($range)->AutoFit();
}
$Sheet->Columns("c")->{ColumnWidth} = 56;
AE6382
Example - Perl
# Insert borders around cells
my @edges = qw(xlEdgeBottom xlEdgeLeft xlEdgeRight xlEdgeTop xlInsideHorizontal xlInsideVertical);
$range = "b1:c56";
foreach my $edge (@edges) {
with (my $Borders = $Sheet->Range($range)->Borders(eval($edge)),
LineStyle => xlContinuous,
Weight => xlThin,
ColorIndex => 1);
}
# Insert a picture
my $picture1 = $Excel->Worksheets('Sheet2')->Shapes->AddPicture('c:\latham\ae8801d\image.jpg',-1,-1,0,0,200,200);
$Excel->Worksheets('Sheet2')->{Name} = "B-17";
#$picture1->{Left} = 100;
#$picture1->{Top} = 100;
# Save
$Book->SaveAs($excel_file);
# Create a chart
my $Sheet3 = $Excel->Worksheets('Sheet3');
my $Chart1 = $Sheet3->ChartObjects->Add(200,200,200,200);
$Sheet3->{Name} = "Chart Example";
$Chart1->Chart->ChartWizard({Source => $Sheet3->Cells(1)});
$Chart1->Chart->SeriesCollection(1)->{Values} = [19,3,24,56,34,33,16,10,3,100];
# Print a list of the worksheets
foreach my $Sheet (in $Book->{Worksheets}) {
print "Worksheet:\t",$Sheet->{Name},"\n";
}
print "Ready to quit";
<>;
exit;
AE6382
Example - JScript
// var fso = new ActiveXObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject");
var excel = new ActiveXObject("Excel.Application");
excel.DisplayAlerts = 0;
excel.Visible = 1;
var book = excel.Workbooks.Add();
var sheet = book.Worksheets("Sheet1");
sheet.Activate();
sheet.Name = "sample sheet";
var wk2 = excel.Worksheets("Sheet2");
var pic1 = wk2.Shapes.AddPicture("c:\\latham\\ae8801d\\image.jpg",-1,-1,100.,100.,100.,50.);
wk2.Name = "B-17";
pic1.Left = 100;
pic1.Top = 100;
WScript.Echo("Hello");
WScript.Sleep(2000);
excel.Worksheets(1).Activate();
WScript.Sleep(2000);
excel.Worksheets(2).Activate();
WScript.Sleep(2000);
excel.Worksheets(3).Activate();
WScript.Sleep(2000);
//var stdout = WScript.StdOut;
//var stdin = WScript.StdIn;
//var answer = stdin.ReadLine();
//stdout.WriteLine(answer);
excel.Quit();
// var in = File("stdin");
// fgets(in);
AE6382
Example - Python
import win32com.client
excel = win32com.client.Dispatch("Excel.Application","Quit")
excel.DisplayAlerts = 0
excel.Visible = 1
book = excel.Workbooks.Add()
sheet = book.Worksheets("Sheet1")
sheet.Activate()
sheet.Name = "sample sheet"
picture = excel.Worksheets("Sheet2").Shapes.AddPicture("c:\\latham\\ae8801d\\image.jpg",-1,-1,100.,100.,100.,50.)
excel.Worksheets("Sheet2").Name = "B-17"
picture.Left = 100
picture.Top = 100
# Create a chart
#sheet = excel.Worksheets('Sheet3');
#chart1 = sheet.ChartObjects.Add(200,200,200,200);
#sheet.Name = "Chart Example";
#chart1.Chart.ChartWizard({Source => $Sheet3->Cells(1)});
#chart1.Chart.SeriesCollection(1)->{Values} = [19,3,24,56,34,33,16,10,3,100];
print "Hello from excel1.py"
answer = raw_input("Quit ? ")
excel.Quit();
AE6382
Descargar

M/S Scripting Documentation