POETRY
FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE
Poems are divided into LINES and
then are grouped into
STANZAS.
Stanzas: verses in poetry
Figurative Language

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Writing or speech not meant to
be taken literally
Poets use figures of speech to
state ideas in vivid and
imaginative ways
Metaphors




Describe one thing as if it were
something else
Do NOT use the word “like” or
“as”
The house was a zoo this
morning.
Turn to page 536
Similes




Use “like” or “as” to compare
two apparently unlike things
He stormed into the meeting like
a tornado.
The boy was as hungry as a
horse.
Turn to page 544.
Personification

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Gives human qualities to
something that is not human
The cars growled in the traffic.
The trees danced slowly in the
wind.
Pg. 538
Symbol

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Anything (an object, person,
animal, place, image) that
represents something else
The dove is a common symbol
for peace.
A heart is a symbol for love.
Turn to page 543
HYPERBOLE
An exaggeration or
overstatement.
 Example:
“I’m so angry, I could spit nails.”
“I’m so hungry, I could eat a
horse.”

ALLUSION
When authors refer to familiar people,
places, things, or events to give their
readers points of reference.
 Example:
Instead of saying, “You know how Noel is–
clean, organized, and studious.” You could
simply say to someone who know Noel
“You know how Noel is. We have nothing
to worry about.” Without all of the shared
details, the person you are talking to will
know what you are talking about.
OR: She is such a Scrooge, she never
spends a dime.

IMAGERY

The art of using words to create
an experience you might
otherwise perceive through your
sense of sight, hearing, smell,
touch—even taste. By
describing the things you might
see or hear, for example,
authors bring their writing to life–
and make the writing itself an
experience.
MOOD

The feelings created by the
poem in the reader.
HYPERBOLE


An extreme exaggeration
It is so hot outside, I feel as if I
am going to melt.
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POETRY - Central Dauphin School District