Innovation, Technology
Transfer and Implementation
Africa Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation
for Youth Employment, Human Capital Development,
and Inclusive Growth
Nairobi
April 2, 2012
Matt Rainey
Director, Innovation Division, WIPO
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WIPO’s Innovation Division – People
International Staff fluent in 13 languages
Various backgrounds and professional experience
Private enterprises
Legal
Technical
Government
Diplomatic
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Phases of Innovation: WIPO Training
WIPO provides training and capacity-building throughout
the phases of innovation:
Conception
Selection
Prototypes
Implementation (with refinements)
Dissemination (Products, Knowledge)
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Models of Innovation:
Traditional (“Closed”) Innovation
Prevailing model of innovation in economy based on
manufacturing industry
Centrally conceived and implemented
Single entity
R&D Lab
Company
Start-up
Sole inventor
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Models of Innovation:
Networked (Open) Innovation
“Open Innovation” (= Networked Innovation)
Innovative contributions from multiple sources
Responds to needs of knowledge-based economy
Accelerates dissemination of know-how
Not the knowledge you have
Rather: network to obtain the knowledge you need
Particularly suited to young professionals
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WIPO Technology Transfer and
Innovation
Tech transfer entities that WIPO works with:
Universities
Research institutions
Private sector entities
Individuals International organizations
Governments
IGOs (Intergovernmental organizations)
NGOs (Nongovernmental organizations)
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Technology Transfer and Innovation –
WIPO Resources and Training
National economic strategy
IP infrastructure
IP laws and regulations
IP education
Institutional infrastructure
IP Offices
Licensing infrastructure (governmental and private)
Technology management infrastructure
TTOs, technology incubators, industrial parks, etc.
Dispute resolution and enforcement
WIPO Arbitration & Mediation Center
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Technology Transfer – Legal Elements
Convert Innovation to Implementation
Institutional innovation ecosystem based on IPR management
institutional policies
Should be aligned with the national IP/Innovation strategy
Issues
IP ownership of the research results
IP management procedures – disclosure, protection,
development, IP valuation, marketing, commercialization
Development and management of IP portfolio
Standard models of agreements
Benefit sharing
Conflicts of interest
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WIPO: the Global Technology Database
PATENTSCOPE: www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/
Rich knowledge source
Patent landscapes on many topics
HIV vaccines
Water desalination
Solar cooking
Malaria prevention and treatment
Essential medicines in developing countries
Etc.
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WIPO-Sponsored Knowledge Sources
ASPI: Access to Specialized Patent Information
http://www.wipo.int/aspi/en/
Public-private partnership between WIPO and leading
patent info providers
For IP offices, academic institutions and research
organizations in developing countries
Free or low-cost access to sophisticated tools and
services for retrieving and analyzing patent data
ARDI: Access to Research for Development &
Innovation
http://www.wipo.int/ardi/en/
Increase availability of ST info in developing countries
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WIPO Research and Training
TISCs: Technology and Innovation Support Centers
http://www.wipo.int/patentscope/en/programs/tisc/
In 65 countries (often in IP offices)
Access to online patent and non-patent (scientific and
technical) resources
Access to industrial property-related publications
Assistance in searching and retrieving technology
information
Training in searching databases
On-demand searches (novelty, state-of-the-art,
infringement)
Technology and competitor monitoring
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WIPO Research and Training (cont’d)
IP laws
Management and strategy
Technology commercialization and marketing
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WIPO Tech Transfer Publications
“IP Asset Management Series”
Application of IP asset management principles and
methods in the context of proactive public policies
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WIPO IP Asset Management Series
Available at http://www.wipo.int
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WIPO IP Asset Management Series
Study on how IP can contribute to
economic growth in ASEAN countries
Recommendations focused on:
IP strategic plans
Development of IP professionals
Promotion of licensing and
commercialization
Financial initiatives
Potential benefits for region to
explore the creation of an ASEAN
Regional Network with
participation from universities,
R&D centers and other IP-related
institutions
Available at http://www.wipo.int
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WIPO IP Asset Management Series
Objective
Fill the critical shortage of persons
skilled in drafting patents in
developing counties
Target audience
Scientists, researchers,
technology managers, inventors
and attorneys who will be drafting
patent applications
Key deliverable
Clear understanding of patent
scope, including claims
Understanding structure of patent
documents and patent application
procedures
Determining what, when, how and
where to patent
Claim designing and drafting skills
Available at http://www.wipo.int
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WIPO IP Asset Management Series
4-5 day two-part program
Theoretical
Simulation of licensing negotiation
Key goals: create synergies and
promote networking
3 levels: Basic, Advanced and “Training
of Trainers”
Available in Arabic, Chinese, English,
French, Portuguese, Romanian,
Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Vietnamese
New Editions in Preparation:
Sustainable and Evolving
Subject matter is area of substantial
collaboration between WIPO and
professional regional and international
associations (LESI, AUTM, ASTF, etc.)
Available at http://www.wipo.int
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WIPO IP Asset Management Series
New publication for late 2012: Intellectual Property Policies and Technology
Transfer Procedures for Universities and Research and Development
Institutions
Structured around 10 key critical issues for IP asset management,
protection and commercialization
Practical guide for:
Issues in institutional IP policies
Issues in organization of technology transfer offices
IP and technology management procedures for R&D operations
Issues in technology transfer and commercialization of technology and
R&D results
Training program
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WIPO Training for
R&D Networks & IP Hubs
Model developed by WIPO and 10 partner institutions
Key elements
Fosters scientific collaboration
Improves technical results
Optimizes resource allocation
Leverages economies of scale
Reduces costs of research and IP protection, management and
commercialization
Has been implemented in the health R&D sector of 7 countries
Colombia
6 West African countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad,
Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Republic of Congo
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R&D Networks & IP Hubs
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Some countries where WIPO has implemented capacity-building programs
Europe
Arab
Countries
Central
and Latin
America
Asia Pacific
Africa
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Africa
• ARIPO
• Namibia
• CEMAC
• Nigeria
• Cameroon
• OAPI
• Ethiopia
• Rwanda
• Ivory Coast
• Senegal
• Kenya
• South Africa,
• Madagascar
• Zambia
• Mauritius
• Zimbabwe
• Mozambique
• Uganda
Back to the map
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Arab Countries
• Algeria
• Bahrain
• Dubai
• Egypt
• Jordan
• Morocco
• Oman
• Saudi Arabia
• Syria
• Tunisia
Back to the map
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Asia Pacific Region
• China
• India
• Indonesia
• Kyrgyzstan
• Malaysia
• Philippines
• Singapore
• South Korea
• Sri Lanka
• Thailand
• Vietnam
Back to the map
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Europe
• Croatia
• FYR of Macedonia
• Hungary
• Italy
• Lithuania
• Serbia
• Slovenia
• Spain,
• Turkey
• Ukraine
Back to the map
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Central and Latin America
• Argentina
• Ecuador
• Barbados
• Jamaica
• Brazil
• México
• Chile
• Panama
• Colombia
• Peru
• Costa Rica
• Trinidad Tobago
• Cuba
• Uruguay
• Domenican
Republic
Back to the map
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Establishment of TTOs
in Arab Region
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Establishment of TTOs in Arab Region
WIPO has developed project in response to request by five
Arab region countries
Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia
Objective: Assist developing countries to create innovation
infrastructure to support university-industry collaboration
Features:
Commercialize fruits of research
Build connections with & within private sector
“Convert” lab research into companies and jobs
Particularly benefits professional graduates
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Establishment of TTOs in Arab Region
Funding
Jordan: discussing with Islamic Development Bank
Others: discussing with AfDB
Flexible framework – adjustable to needs of individual
countries
Each country “owns” its operation
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Establishment of TTOs in Arab Region
Key operations
Transfer of knowledge
Setting up infrastructure
Creating intermediaries able to facilitate innovation and technology
transfer
Two parts
Country-specific projects
Arab region innovation network
Innovation partnerships and networks
national, regional and interregional
Networked innovation model of
regional collaboration
Duration
26 months in each country
38 months for entire region
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Establishment of TTOs in Arab Region –
Project Partners
Core Project Partners – parties of the Framework Project Agreement
Governments of participating countries
Donor partners
Arab Science and Technology Foundation (ASTF)
WIPO (as executive agent)
Other Partners
Potential contributors with expert experience in relevant areas
Professional associations
Scientific foundations
Private sector
Financial institutions
NGOs
International organizations
Other partners
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Establishment of TTOs in Arab Region
Status
2010: WIPO met with all 5 countries and development
partners (including AfDB) in Tunisia
2011: Project submitted by countries to AfDB
Project document later submitted to AfDB
WIPO continues its discussions with AfDB
Project partners (4 African countries) are hopeful of
support
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Next Steps Using WIPO Resources
TISCs, R&D Hubs
Can become elements of worldwide networks
Ongoing training
Patent analysis
Licensing
Know-how
Implementation
TTOs in Arab Regions
Can be replicated elsewhere in Africa
Thank you
Matt Rainey
Director, Innovation Division, WIPO
[email protected]
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Intellectual Property and Open Innovation: Potential