Assertive Discipline
Methods Of Teaching
Coleen Guest
Fall 2001
Understanding The Goals of
Misbehavior
There are two common forms of behaviors:
-Attention-Seeking Behavior and
-Power Behavior
Active Characteristics of
Attention-Seeking Behavior
Student does all kinds of behaviors that
distract the teacher and their classmates.
Active Characteristics of Power
Behavior
Temper tantrums and verbal tantrums:
Student is disruptive and confrontive.
Passive Characteristics of
Attention-Seeking Behavior
Student exhibits one-pea-at-a-time behavior,
operates on slow, slower, slowest speeds.
Passive Characteristics of Power
Behavior
Quiet Noncompliance:
-Student does his or her own thing, yet often
is pleasant and even agreeable.
Origins of Behavior for
Attention-Seeking Behavior
Parents and teachers tend to pay more
attention to misbehavior than to appropriate
behavior.
Young people aren’t taught how to ask for
attention appropriately.
Young people may be deprived of sufficient
personal attention.
Origins of Behavior for Power
Behavior
Student hides behind a label: Transforms bid for
power into inherent personality trait.
Changes in society that stress equality in
relationships, rather that dominant-submissive
roles.
The exaltation of the individual and the emphasis
on achieving personal power, as epitomized by the
human potential movement.
Students’ Legitimate Needs for
Attention-Seeking Behavior
Positive recognition.
Students’ Legitimate Needs for
Power Behavior
Personal autonomy.
Silver Lining for AttentionSeeking Behavior
Student wants a relationship with the
teacher and classmates.
Silver Lining for Power Behavior
Student Exhibits:
-Leadership Potential
-Assertiveness
-Independent Thinking
Principals of Prevention for
Attention-Seeking Behavior
Catch the student being good by giving lots
of attention for appropriate behavior.
Teach student to ask directly for attention
when needed.
Principals of Prevention for
Power Behavior
Allow voice and choice so student has
options and feels heard.
Grant legitimate power through handsjoined discipline and decision making.
Delegate responsibility so student feels a
sense of responsible power.
Avoid and defuse confrontations.
Strategies and Techniques for
Attention-Seeking Behavior
Minimize the attention:
-Refuse to respond.
-Give “The Eye”.
-Stand close by.
-Use name dropping.
-Send a general or secret signal.
-Give a written notice.
-Use an I-message.
Strategies for Attention-Seeking
Behavior Continued
Clarify desired behavior.
-State “Grandma’s Law”.
-Use “target-stop-do”.
Strategies for Attention-Seeking
Behavior Continued
Legitimize the behavior.
-Create a lesson from the misbehavior.
-Go the distance.
-Have the class join in.
-Use a diminishing quota.
Strategies for Attention-Seeking
Behavior Continued
Do the unexpected.
-Turn out the lights.
-Play a musical sound.
-Lower your voice.
-Change your voice.
-Talk to the wall.
-Use one-liners
-Cease teaching temporarily.
Strategies for Attention-Seeking
Behavior Continued
Distract the students.
Ask a direct question.
Ask a favor.
Give choices.
Change the activity.
Strategies for Attention-Seeking
Behavior Continued
Notice appropriate behavior.
-Use proximity praise.
-Use compliance praise.
-Make recordings.
-Give a standing voice.
Strategies for Attention-Seeking
Behavior Continued
Move the student.
-Change the student’s seat.
-Use the thinking chair.
Strategies and Techniques for
Power Behavior
Make a graceful exit.
-Acknowledge student’s power.
-Remove the audience.
-Table the manner.
-Schedule a conference.
-Use a fogging technique: Agree with the
student or change the subject.
Strategies and Techniques for
Power Behavior
Make a graceful exit – continued.
-State both viewpoints.
-Refuse responsibility.
-Dodge irrelevant issues.
-Deliver a closing statement.
-Call the student’s bluff.
-Take teacher time-out.
Strategies and Techniques for
Power Behavior
Use time-out.
-Use the language of choice.
-Call the who squad.
-Require a reentry plan.
Set Consequences for Power
Behavior
Loss or delay of privileges.
-Loss or delay of an activity.
-Loss or delay of using objects.
-Loss or delay of access to school areas.
Set Consequences for Power
Behavior Continued
Loss of freedom of interaction.
-Denied interactions with other students.
-Required interactions with school
personnel.
-Required interactions with parents.
-Required interactions with police.
Set Consequences for Power
Behavior Continued
Restitution:
-Return, repair, or replacement of
objects.
-Repayment of time.
-Compensation to classmates and
teachers.
-School service.
Set Consequences for Power
Behavior
Re-teach appropriate behavior.
-Extended practice.
-Written reports.
* Conduct a teacher-student conference.*
References
Beach Center on Families and Disability. (1995).
What research says: Understanding challenging
behavior and teaching new skills. Lawrence,
KS:Author.
Piant, R.C. (1999). Enhancing relationships between
children and teachers. Washington, D.C: American
Psychological Association.
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Assertive Discipline