Driving Achievement With Ed-Tech
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Gerald Herbert/AP
Our Moderator
Kevin Bushweller
Executive editor of Education Week
Digital Directions
www.digitaldirections.org
For daily posts, visit the Digital Education Blog @
www.edweek.org/go/diged
Guest
Michelle Davis
Senior writer, Education Week Digital Directions
Featured Guests
Chris Small
Vice president of curriculum and instruction, R. Frank
Nims Middle School, Tallahassee, Fla.
Barbara Greenstone
Statewide integration mentor, Maine Learning
Technology Initiative
Joe Kitchens
Superintendent, Western Heights School District,
Oklahoma City, Okla.
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One-to-One Computing in Our
Middle and High School
Classrooms
The Maine Learning
Technology Initiative
Barbara Greenstone
MLTI Statewide Integration
Mentor
[email protected]
The MLTI has at its core
5 operational goals:
1) Equity,
2) Integration with Maine’s Learning
Results,
3) Sustainability/Avoiding Obsolescence,
4) Teacher Preparation and Professional
Development, and
5) Economic Development.
Professional Development is the
underpinning that makes it work.
•Day-long, face-to-face workshops in each of nine regions
•Regional leadership team meetings
•Workshops at state conferences
•Tech updates
•School-based workshops
•Online workshops
•Weekly webinars
•Blog posts
•Podcasts (iTunesU)
•Informal support
8
Gains in Student Achievement
Writing
• Compared before and after 1to-1 implementation
•Writing scores on MEA
improved approximately 1/3 of a
standard deviation
•Twice as many students using
laptops for all stage of writing
process met proficiency
standard
•Improvements were
independent of test format –
online or paper and pencil.
http://usm.maine.edu/cepare/
Gains in Student Achievement
Math
• 2-year study that included
professional development for
teachers in experimental group
•Improvement in teachers’
knowledge and practice with
technology
•Improvement in students’
scores on tests designed for
study and on MEAs.
http://usm.maine.edu/cepare/
Student Tech Team Conference
•Annual conference at
University of Maine
•PD for kids
•800+ participants in 2009,
planning for 1000 in 2010
•Sessions led by
professors, students,
teachers, community
members, MLTI staff
•Door prizes include
university scholarships
For more information...
www.mlti.org
www.maine121.org
iTunesU
How do
educators meet
new technology
demands?
With The Alan Sitomer BookJam,
you can bridge the gap
between the
English Language Arts classroom
and 21st-century, high-tech
compositions.
Education Week Webinar
Joe Kitchens – Western Heights Superintendent
[email protected]
Dr. Mwarumba Mwavita – Western Heights Director of
School Improvement
[email protected]
Objectives
* Scope of the drop-out problem
* Factors contributing to drop-out &
completion rates
* Data-driven solutions
Western Heights: “Intent on 10%”
Western Heights Public Schools is a diverse, multicultural, high-challenge school district consisting of
six school sites located in the southwest quadrant
of Oklahoma City, serving 3,400 students.
 African American
23.5%
 Asian/Pacific
4.0%
 Hispanic
19.5%
 Caucasian
43.9%
 Native American
9.0%
 Other
.1%
 Low Socio-Economic
 Eng. Lang. Learners
 Special Services
 Male
 Female
 Mobile (4 year rate)
79.3%
13.2%
14.8%
51.7%
48.3%
70.0%+
America’s Promise: A Special Analytic Report
on High School Graduation- 2008
• Half of all public high school students in the US’ fifty largest cities fail
to graduate. 2003-2004 Data
Graduation Rate
• Tulsa
• Oklahoma City
• Western Heights (FY 2007)
50.6%
47.5%
53.1%
Rank
32
36
NA
• The report states that only 52 percent of public high school students
in these cities graduate after four years, while the national average
is 70 percent
Academic Performance of Durational Cohorts at
the Middle School Level (State Test)
Students who begin their education early and stay in
the same school tend to do better academically.
Academic Success/Failure:
10th-12th Grade versus 12th Grade Only
10th- 12th Grade
Success Rate
12th Grade Only
Success Rate
Original Students
430/630 = 68%
144/206 = 69.9%
Transfers In
167/364 = 46%
64/133 = 48.1%
Transfers Out
W/Request for Record
195/357 = 54.6%
86/146 = 58.9%
Transfers In/Transfers
Out
126/225 = 56%
*Mobility
236/496 = 47.7%
45/83 = 54.2%
105/196 = 53.6%
What does the Longitudinal Data Tell Us?
 Mobility has a Huge Impact on
Academic Achievement and
Student Success
 The Negative Impact of Mobility is
Evident at all Levels of Education
(Elementary, Middle, High School)
How Do We Address the Problem
of Mobility in Our Schools?
 Establish Intervention Strategies at Site
Levels that Effectively Identify and Serve
Mobile Students
 Set Standards for the Articulation of RealTime Data Between Districts and States:
 Student Performance Data
 Teaching and Learning Resources Data
 Demographic Data
Effective Use of LDS
 How Does LDS Impact Parents and
Students?
 How Does LDS Impact Teachers?
 How Does LDS Impact
Administrators?
Western Heights SIF Infrastructure
– Zone Integration
Server (ZIS)
Network Account
(EduStructures)
Student
Information System
(Pearson SMS)
Library
Automation (Follett
Destiny)
– SIF Agents
Food Service
(Data Futures)
Transportation System
(Route Point)
– Applications
– SIF Data Objects
Coming Soon:
Human Resources &
Finance
State Student
ID System
(Mizuni)
Data Warehouse
(Mizuni)
Data Analysis
& Reporting
(Mizuni)
Instructional Services
(Microsoft Class Server
& Renaissance Place)
Instructional
Management
(Campusware
Grade book, EZ
IEP, & EZ Planner)
Business Processes that Drive the LDS

Single Source of Data Entry

Schools Interoperability Framework (SIF) Compliant
 SIF Agents Present to Support Zone Integration of
Disparate Applications (i.e., Allows Deployment of
Best-of-Breed Solutions)

Historical Capability Within the Student Information
System (SIS) & Other Systems (Avoid Annual
Dumping of Data)
Business Processes that Drive the LDS

Family Information Management Capability in
Place (Especially in the SIS)

Capability to Support Flexible Insertion of New
Data Packages as Federal & State Reporting
Requirements Change (e.g., English Language
Learner Parameters)
Historical Schedules for a Specific Student
FY 2010 Schedule
FY 2009 Schedule
FY 2007 Schedule
FY 2008 Schedule
FY 2009
IOWA
and
State
CRT’s
FY 2010 Teacher Schedule
Common Language / Longitudinal Growth Model
Development
Step 1: Mizuni developed a database called the “common language editor” that is uniquely
capable of receiving standards-based information and assessment-based
information from multiple sources.
Step 2: Approximately 40 Educators (including more than 25 teachers) created and
organized a “Common Language” database for Math, Language Arts, Science, and
Social Studies for grades Pre-Kindergarten through 12 that consists of more than
25,000 data objects.
Step 3: Administrators set the criteria in the Mizuni built “concept mapping profile tool”.
They choose which assessments and standards will be mapped to the common
language, based on district needs. To date the system has been set up to map all
Oklahoma state criterion tests, ITBS and Performance Series assessments.
Step 4: Educators have developed and utilized the “common language mapping tool” to
map both current and previous forms of Oklahoma State Standards to the teacher
developed common languages in math, language arts, and science. This work is
still underway in social studies and planned for completion in summer 2010.
Step 5:
Teachers will use the Mizuni built “common language mapping tool” to
map various standardized assessments including state and normreferenced assessments in languages arts, math, science, and social
studies. Math, language arts, and science is planned for completion in
Feb 2010, while social studies will be completed in summer 2010.
Step 6:
Use the information created in steps 1-5 to develop a longitudinal
growth model indicating the level of academic achievement of
individual students and groups of students over time. Thereby creating
a foundation for the establishment of longitudinal measurements of
teacher success over time.
Step 7:
By March 2010, we will create a reporting tool capable of demonstrating
the longitudinal growth of individual students and groups of students in
math, science, and language arts (social studies by Aug 2010).
Step 8:
By August 2010, we will create the longitudinal measures of teacher
success over time. (growth model reporting)
Creating a Measure of Teacher Value-Add
Having access to …
* historical student schedules
* multiple assessment results
* linkage with the common language
…. provides us the ability to demonstrate the
instructional value a teacher brings to multiple
students over time.
Raising the Bar…
Setting the Standard:
The Integration of Out of the Box
Programs in order to
Impact Student Achievement
Motivating Students to be College Bound
Organized by Department Divisions
(not grade levels)
NEW
College
Style
Web
Design
for better
Communication
Each
School
will
have its
own
Entry
Page
SOFTWARE
FOR THE
CLASSROOM
Each
Grade
Level
and
Teacher
has a
Page
Statistics



In today’s workplace, only 40 percent of adults who dropped
out of high school are employed, compared to 60 percent of
adults who completed high school and 80 percent for those with
a bachelor’s degree or higher (Alliance for Excellence, 2005).
High school graduation especially benefits African-American
workers: those with a diploma earn an average of 47% more
annually than their counterparts who did not graduate
(Southern Regional Education Board, 2005).
The overall poverty rate of a person in Florida measured in the
2000 census was 2 million persons. 78 percent of children
whose parents do not have a high school degree live in lowincome families (National Center for Children in Poverty).
Statistics Continued...



High school graduation rates are below par, with only an
estimated 68 percent of students who enter the ninth grade
graduating with a regular high school diploma in the twelfth
grade (US Department of Education).
The Census data for 2000, when corrected for various
measurement problems, show that whites graduate with a
regular diploma at a rate about 15 percentage points higher
than blacks and about 13 points higher than Hispanics.
Six of the ten fastest growing occupations listed by the U.S.
Department of Labor in its employment projections through
2012 require an associate’s or bachelor’s degree (US
Department of Labor Statistics, 2004).
Florida Virtual Schools
Course Acceleration Program
1.
Indentify Target Overage Students
a.
2.
Parent Town Hall Meeting
a.
3.
4.
Screening Interviews
Parent / Student Contracts
Parent / Student Registration Night
Computer Accessibility and Monitoring
Technology Rich Classrooms
PARENT INVOLVEMENT
TOOLS TO
KEEP
PARENTS
CONCERNED
AND
INFORMED
COMPUTER FOR 6TH, 7TH, & 8TH
GRADER STUDENTS
@ HOME
Questions and Comments…
Contact Information:
Nims Middle School
723 W. Orange Ave
Tallahassee, FL 32305
Mr. Christopher Small
Assistant Principal of Curriculum
[email protected]
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Spotlight on E-learning
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provides insights on the growth of online classes,
research on the effectiveness of online learning,
managing the schedules of virtual classrooms,
organizing and preparing to teach virtual classes,
online professional development, and more.
Buy now!
www.edweek.org/go/elearn-spotlight
@
Join our community of ed. tech leaders and
educators at the Digital Directions social
network on Ning. Discuss, collaborate, and
get answers to your most pressing ed. tech
questions.
http://digitaldirections.ning.com
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available at
www.edweek.org/go/webinar
in less than 24hrs.
Thanks for taking part today. We really appreciate it.
The Editors @ edweek.org
How do educators meet
new technology demands?
The Alan Sitomer BookJam
provides educators with:
• options for execution
• composition prompts and
outlines
• technological assistance
• grading rubrics
You can choose
from No Tech –
Low Tech – High Tech
projects because
all educators and
students have
different
technological
capabilities!
All high-tech projects meet 21st-century technological learning standards!
For more information on
The Alan Sitomer BookJam
and to take a tour,
please visit www.thebookjam.com
or call 1-800-638-1304.
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