Training on the
2008-2009 LPAC Decision-Making
Process for the
Texas Assessment Program
1
TEA trains ESCs
ESCs train districts
LPACs use manual to make
spring 2009 testing decisions
2
Procedural Manual for 2008-2009 3
What’s New This Year?
• Updated information on assessments
for students served by special
education
• Information about new English language
proficiency standards
• Information related to transition from
RPTE to new TELPAS reading tests
• Updated state assessment results
4
Updated Information on
Assessments for Students Served
by Special Education
• Page 2: Updated program descriptions
• Changes detailed on page iii of 2009
District and Campus Coordinator Manual
• Page 37: TAKS-M accommodation
changes affecting LAT (more on this in
later slides)
5
References to English
Language Proficiency
Standards (ELPS)
◦ Page 5: References to ELPS
requirements and ELPS-TELPAS
alignment
◦ Page 41: ELPS related to
linguistically accommodated
instruction
6
Information Related to
Transition from RPTE to New
TELPAS Reading Tests
• Page 14: Indicates change in use of
past RPTE results in exemption
criteria
• Page 71: Summarizes effect of
transition on 2007-08 AMAO
requirements and plans for current
school year
7
Spring 2008 Statewide
TELPAS Results
• Page 72: Results by years in U.S.
schools for grades 3-12
• Page 73: K-2 results by grade
8
A Close Look at
the LPAC Manual
9
Statutory Authority
TEC, Section 39.027(e)
TEC, Section 39.023(m)
Page i
10
Purposes of LPAC Manual
• To help ensure that LPACs make
consistent, informed assessment
decisions
• To increase awareness of
second language learners’
educational needs
Page i
11
5 Major Topics of
the LPAC Manual
1. Determining student needs
2. Providing instructional interventions
3. Monitoring student progress
4. Making assessment decisions
5. Maintaining necessary documentation
Page i
12
Table of Contents
• Overview
• Giving TAKS in English or Spanish
• LEP Exemptions and LAT
• Exit Level LEP Postponement
• Student Examples
• Documentation Requirements
• Using Test Results to Monitor Progress
• LEP Students Served by Special Education
• FAQs
• Appendices
13
Overview
Pages 1-8
14
Components of the Texas
Assessment Program
•
•
•
•
•
•
TAKS
TAKS (Accommodated)
TAKS–M
TAKS–Alt
LAT
TELPAS
Pages 2 & 3
15
Background
• The Texas ELL population is growing.
• Curriculum, assessment, and
accountability requirements have
become more rigorous.
• It is important to help this growing
population meet new, higher
standards.
16
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
• ELLs in grades 3–8 and 10 must be included
in state reading and math assessments. Most
ELLs take TAKS in English or Spanish.
• ELLs designated as LEP-exempt by Texas
policy are included in math and reading AYP
calculations through TELPAS reading* and
LAT.
*LEP-exempt first-year immigrants only
Pages 4 & 5
17
AYP Inclusion
Subject
Math
Reading
and
ELA
Test
School Yr.
in U.S.
AYP
AYP
Participati Performance
on
2nd and 3rd


*

TELPAS
Reading
1st

*
LAT
2nd and 3rd


LAT
1st
* = not evaluated for AYP
Science: No science results are used in AYP (hence, no LAT
science results are used in AYP).
18
Annual Measurable Achievement
Objectives (AMAOs)
• AMAOs are specific to ELLs.
• AMAOs hold districts accountable for
improving the English language proficiency
and academic achievement of ELLs.
• Two AMAO indicators evaluate English
language proficiency. The third AMAO
indicator evaluates academic achievement.
• Details about AMAO indicators are on
page 71.
Page 4
19
TELPAS Reading, Grades 2–12
• Revised TELPAS reading tests for
grades 2–12 were implemented in
spring 2008.
• Will be administered as an online
testing program starting in spring
2009
20
TELPAS Reading, Grades 2–12
• In rare instances a student may need an
accommodation not available in an online
administration.
• In such instances, an Accommodation Request
Form must be submitted to request a paper
administration.
• At least 2 weeks are needed for TEA to
process the request; about 1 additional week
is needed for ordering and shipping approved
paper materials.
See page 210 of the 2009 District and Campus
Coordinator Manual for process to follow to request
paper tests if rare circumstances aren’t related to
testing accommodations.
21
Meeting the Needs of ELLs
• Learning challenging academic
content along with a second language
is not easy.
• Many LEP students are not able to
succeed academically without prompt
and carefully targeted instructional
support.
22
ELLs Have Varying Needs
While some ELLs have an excellent
academic foundation and knowledge of
2 or more languages, others may enter
U.S. schools with no English and limited
prior schooling.
23
Effective Instructional Programs
for ELLs —
• focus on helping students excel rather
than meet minimum expectations
• help immigrants with adequate prior
schooling “stay in step” academically as
they learn English
• intervene quickly to help students with
insufficient prior schooling
24
3 Educational Goals
The following goals are
reinforced by the
assessment requirements.
25
Goal 1
When the needs of ELLs are addressed
promptly and effectively—
LEP students enrolled in U.S. schools
since 1st grade will be able to meet the
TEKS requirements as measured by TAKS
in English or Spanish by grade 3.
26
Goal 2
When the needs of ELLs are addressed
promptly and effectively—
most immigrant LEP students in Spanish
bilingual programs will be able to meet the
TEKS requirements as measured by
Spanish TAKS in their 1st year in the U.S.
27
Goal 3
When the needs of ELLs are addressed
promptly and effectively—
most immigrant LEP students entering
U.S. schools with little or no English or
with limited prior schooling will be able to
meet the TEKS requirements as
measured on TAKS by their 3rd year in
the U.S.
28
Role of the LPAC
• In order for the LPAC to implement the testing
requirements, committee members must
– adhere to the provisions in this manual,
– monitor student progress and determine appropriate
instructional interventions,
– make assessment decisions on an individual student
basis,
– function as a committee to make assessment decisions,
– document assessment decisions, instructional
interventions for exempted students, and the reason
for each exemption in the student’s permanent record
file.
29
TAKS in English or
Spanish?
Pages 10-12
30
Giving TAKS in English or
in Spanish
LPACs are responsible for deciding
whether non-exempt Spanish speakers
in grades 3–6 will take TAKS in English
or Spanish, in accordance with the
following rules.
31
Rules
• Spanish TAKS may be taken for 3 years.
• Years of LEP exemption plus Spanish
TAKS may not exceed 3.
32
Counting Years
Years of taking Spanish TAKS are
counted in terms of years of TAKS
administrations. That is, grades 1
and 2 don’t count because TAKS is
not administered in these grades.
33
Language Appropriateness
Decisions about whether to give
TAKS in English or Spanish are
guided by—
•
•
the language of the student’s
instruction, and
the language in which the student
is best able to demonstrate
academic skills.
34
Subject Area Decisions
The decision to administer TAKS
in Spanish or English may vary by
subject area.
35
Students in Spanish Bilingual
Programs
Spanish TAKS is generally
appropriate for students
receiving most of their academic
instruction in Spanish.
36
Students in ESL Programs
Spanish TAKS may sometimes be
appropriate for a student in an
ESL program.
37
LEP Exemptions
(pages 13-32)
&
LAT Administrations
(pages 33-39)
38
Commissioner’s Rules
LEP exemption criteria are based
on the commissioner’s rules in the
Texas Administrative Code (TAC),
Section 101.1007.
(see TAC link in Appendix A)
39
LPAC Manual Terminology
General exemption criteria
Specific exemption criteria
Category 1
Category 2
40
Term: General Exemption Criteria
5 “record-keeping” criteria a
student must meet before LPAC
can consider specific exemption
criteria
41
Term: Specific Exemption Criteria
Criteria relating to whether a LEP
student has academic or
linguistic difficulties stemming
from schooling outside U.S.
42
Terms: Category 1 and Category 2
Category 1:
Immigrant LEP students in Spanish
bilingual programs in grades 3–6
Category 2:
Other immigrant LEP students
in grades 3–10
43
The 5 General Exemption
Criteria:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
LEP Status
Program Participation
TAKS Immigrant Status
Years in U.S. Schools
Grades 2-12 TELPAS Reading
Rating
Page 14
44
Use of Previous Reading
Proficiency Ratings in Exemption
Decisions (5th criterion)
• Grades 2–12 TELPAS reading rating,
not RPTE ratings, are to be used for
this exemption criterion
• Because of differences between the
two tests, RPTE ratings not to be
used anymore
See footnote
7 page 14
45
Question:
What impact will this change have on
students who in previous years had
RPTE ratings that preclude LEP
exemptions?
RPTE Ratings That Preclude
LEP Exemptions
• First-year (Y1) immigrants with AH
RPTE ratings
• Second-year (Y2) immigrants with A or
AH RPTE ratings
46
Answer:
This change will have little impact.
• Y1 in US: No impact on 08-09 Y1 immigrants
(These students will not have taken RPTE.)
• Y2 in US: Could potentially affect small number
of immigrants who left US for one or more school
years after Y1 and are back in 08-09 as Y2
immigrants
• Y3 in US: Could potentially affect small number
of 08-09 Y3 immigrants
47
Potential Impact on Small Number of
08-09 Y2 Immigrants Who Left US
after Y1
Example:
• Spring 07, Y1 in US, LEP-exempt, scored AH on
RPTE
• Spent 07-08 school year outside US
• 08-09 in US, Y2 in US
The change: 07 RPTE score of AH does not
automatically preclude Y2 exemption in 08-09. All
other exemption criteria must still be considered,
though, to determine exemption eligibility.
48
Potential Impact on Small Number of
08-09 Y3 Immigrants
Example 1: Immigrants Who Left US after Y2 with
RPTE Score of A or AH
• Spring 07, Y2 in US, LEP-exempt, scored at least A
on RPTE
• 07-08 in Mexico
• 08-09 in US, Y3 in US
The change: Previous RPTE score of at least A
does not automatically preclude Y3 exemption in
08-09. All other exemption criteria must still be
considered, though, to determine exemption
eligibility.
49
Example 2: Student not exempt in Y2 based on
advanced high RPTE score in Y1 could potentially
be eligible for Y3 exemption (but not likely)
• Spring 07, Y1 in US, LEP-exempt, scored AH on
RPTE
• Spring 08, Y2 in US, student took TAKS, scored I on
TELPAS reading test
• 08-09 in US, Y3 in US
The change: Previous RPTE score of AH in Y1
does not automatically preclude Y3 exemption in
08-09. All other exemption criteria must still be
considered, though, to determine exemption
eligibility.
50
Specific Exemption Criteria
Specific exemption criteria differ
according to a student’s—
• category
•
number of school years in the U.S.
51
Categories 1 and 2
The specific exemption criteria
for these students are in
different sections of the manual.
• Category 1: pages 17-24
• Category 2: pages 25-32
52
Specific Exemption Criteria
LPACs must always examine the
immigrant’s—
• school experiences outside U.S.
and
• progress by time of spring testing
53
Exemption Flow Charts
reinforce that students may not
be exempted unless —
• they meet all 5 general criteria; AND
• they entered U.S. with insufficient schooling,
as defined by their category and years in
U.S. schools; AND
• their progress is unsatisfactory as of spring
testing despite interventions; AND
• LPAC attributes lack of progress to schooling
outside U.S.
54
Specifics on Category 1
and Category 2
• The specific exemption criteria differ
depending on the student’s category and
years in U.S. schools.
• The key differences are presented on
the next 5 slides.
55
Category 1—
1st School Year in U.S.
Insufficient schooling outside U.S. =
student was not provided the
foundation of learning outside
the U.S. that Texas requires
at the student’s enrolled grade
56
Category 1—
2nd/3rd School Year in U.S.
Exemptions are rare.
For these students, insufficient schooling
outside the U.S. =
an extensive absence of schooling
outside the U.S. in addition to
limited academic preparedness
Note: Page 20 defines extensive absences of
schooling outside U.S.
57
Category 1: Determining
Progress by Spring
For students determined to have had
insufficient schooling outside the U.S.,
progress by spring =
progressing satisfactorily
in the TEKS required at the
student’s enrolled grade
(in either English or Spanish)
58
Category 2: Insufficient
Schooling Outside U.S.
Insufficient schooling
outside the U.S. =
an inadequate foundation
of learning outside the U.S.
in terms of knowledge of
English and/or academic skills.
59
Category 2: Determining
Progress by Spring
In student’s 1st school year in U.S.,
LPAC considers both academic
language proficiency in English and
academic skills mastery.
In student’s 2nd/3rd school years,
LPAC considers only academic language
proficiency in English.
60
LPAC Decision-Making
Process
A step-by-step process for
examining the specific exemption
criteria and making appropriate
assessment decisions.
For category 1, see pages 22 & 23.
For category 2, see pages 30 & 31.
61
LPAC Decision-Making Process
Step 1. Review schooling outside
U.S.
Step 2. Determine and monitor
instructional interventions
Step 3. Examine current year’s
progress
Step 4. Make and document
assessment decision
62
Exemptions and Targeted
Instructional Support
The LPAC decision process
establishes a link between the
need for exemption and the need
for increased instructional
support and monitoring.
63
Remember
• Students must meet all 5
general exemption criteria to be
eligible for exemption.
• Students must also meet the specific
exemption criteria to be eligible for
exemption.
64
Summaries of Exemption
Criteria
A 1-page list of all exemption
criteria for students in each
category is provided.
For category 1, see page 24.
For category 2, see page 32.
65
What about the
following special
circumstances not
covered in the manual?
66
Special Circumstances
• Would an exemption ever be
permitted for—
– a student who took TAKS last year in
error?
– an elementary student who took Spanish
TAKS last year while in a bilingual
program but switched to a district this
year where only an ESL program is
offered?
Continue 
67
Points to Remember in Handling
Special Circumstances
• Such special circumstances should be
rare, and any error from a previous year
must be explained thoroughly in the
documentation.
• All the general and specific exemption
criteria apply according to the student’s
category and year in U.S. schools, and all
documentation procedures still apply.
Continue 
68
Points to Remember in Handling
Special Circumstances
• The LPAC must be confident that the
decision to exempt a student who
tested previously is not based more
on school accountability concerns
than on concerns for appropriate
measurement of student learning.
Continue 
69
Points to Remember in Handling
Special Circumstances
• It must be clear that a decision to
exempt was made on an individual student basis
(“blanket” decisions are prohibited).
• If a Spanish-speaking student took Spanish TAKS
last year, is in an ESL program this year, and is in
a grade in which Spanish TAKS is an option, the
LPAC must document why Spanish TAKS is not
more appropriate than exemption.
70
Linguistically Accommodated
Testing (LAT)
71
LAT Scheduling for 2009
Date
LAT Test
Grades
Mon, Apr 6
Math
5 and 8
Mon, Apr 27
Math
3, 4, 6, 7, 10
Tues, Apr 28
Reading/ELA
3–8 and 10
Wed, Apr 29
Reading/ELA
Fri, May 1
Science
(Day 1)
(Day 2)
3–8 and 10
5, 8, 10
72
LAT Eligibility
• Eligibility criteria for math/science vs.
reading/ELA differ somewhat.
• LAT math and science
– Given to all LEP-exempt students whether it is
their 1st, 2nd, or 3rd school year in the U.S.
• LAT reading and ELA
– Given to 2nd and 3rd year LEP-exempt immigrants
– NOT given to 1st year LEP-exempt immigrants
73
What about LAT and
SSI?
• Students assessed with LAT math
and reading are not subject to SSI
test requirements.
• They do not retake SSI tests if they
are not successful.
74
LAT Accommodations
75
Determining LAT
Accommodations
• Multiple accommodations are often
appropriate.
• Decisions must be based on the individual
needs of the student and whether the
accommodations are used routinely in
instruction and testing.
• LAT administrations of TAKS vs. LAT
administrations of TAKS–M differ
somewhat. Page 37 and slides 82-84 outline
the key TAKS–M differences.
76
LAT Accommodations
• LAT accommodations are now
described in detail in 2008-2009
Accommodations Manual
• LPAC manual lists LAT
accommodations in charts on pages
34-35
77
Allowable LAT Accommodations
for Math and Science
Indirect
Linguistic
Support
• Clarification of
Test Directions
• Breaks at
Request of
Student
Direct
Linguistic Support
•
•
•
•
•
•
Linguistic Simplification
Oral Translation
Reading Assistance
Bilingual Dictionary
Bilingual Glossary
English and Spanish Side by
Side (grades 3–6 only)
For LAT TAKS–M differences, see slide 84.
78
Allowable LAT Accommodations
for Reading/ELA
Indirect
Linguistic Support
• Clarification of Test
Directions
• Breaks at Request of
Student
• Testing Over 2 Days
Direct
Linguistic Support
•
•
•
•
•
•
Bilingual Dictionary
English Dictionary
Reading Aloud – Word or Phrase
Reading Aloud – Entire Test Item
Oral Translation – Word or Phrase
Clarification – Word or Phrase
Not all of these are allowable for LAT administrations of writing
sections of grade 10 ELA. See page 35 of LPAC manual for details.
79
2-Day LAT Reading/ELA
Administrations
Directions in administrator manual
indicate where in test booklet to
stop at the end of Day 1
80
LAT Reading Tests
For LAT reading, a student may use
an English version or Spanish version
TAKS test in grades 3–6, but not
both.
81
How LAT for TAKS–M
Differs from LAT for TAKS
• Two-day administration of reading/ELA:
A two-day LAT administration of TAKS–M for
reading/ELA is optional, not required. The ARD
committee in conjunction with the LPAC should
determine in advance whether to provide a two-day
administration.
82
How LAT for TAKS–M
Differs from LAT for TAKS
• Test booklets:
Regular TAKS–M test booklets are used for LAT
administrations. Exception: Grade 10 TAKS-M ELA
booklet is marked “LAT”
• Test administrator (TA) manuals:
Rather than using the LAT TA manual, TAs will refer
to the LAT information in the appendix of the
appropriate TAKS–M TA manual. The appendix
includes student scenarios and TAKS–M sample items
that show how to provide the linguistic
accommodations.
83
How LAT for TAKS–M
Differs from LAT for TAKS
• LAT TAKS–M accommodations for math and
science:
– Linguistic simplification guides are not provided for
LAT administrations of TAKS–M. TAs may, however,
simplify the language on the test at the request of the
student in accordance with the specified guidelines for
students who receive this accommodation.
– Spanish versions of TAKS–M are not available. Hence,
they are not available for LAT administrations of
TAKS–M, nor is the accommodation of using English and
Spanish tests side by side.
84
2008-2009 Changes in
LAT Administrations of TAKS-M
• LAT administrations of TAKS-M now
occur at the same time as TAKS and
TAKS Accommodated
• Therefore, the following LAT TAKS–M
administrations will occur in late April
rather than March
–reading for grades 3, 5, and 8
–ELA for grade 10
85
2008-2009 Changes in
LAT Administrations of TAKS-M
• Reading aloud test questions: Reading
aloud questions and answer choices on
TAKS–M reading tests is no longer a
standard test administration procedure.
• Reading aloud test questions is a LAT
accommodation for reading. Therefore,
the LPAC and ARD committee will decide
whether to provide this as a LAT
accommodation.
86
2008-2009 Changes in
LAT Administrations of TAKS-M
• Dictionary use: Dictionaries are no longer
permitted on the revising and editing section
of grade 10 TAKS–M ELA test.
• Dictionaries are not an allowable LAT
accommodation for the revising and editing
section of ELA. Consequently, dictionaries
are no longer allowable for the revising and
editing section of the LAT TAKS–M grade
10 ELA test.
87
Planning for LAT
Administrations
88
Planning for LAT
Administrations
Planning for LAT involves –
• determining and documenting
accommodations
• determining the need for individual vs.
small group LAT administrations
• identifying and training appropriate LAT
test administrators
• identifying test locations
See page 36 for details and pages 38 & 39
for LAT Administration Planning Rosters.
89
Exit Level LEP
Postponement
Pages 40-43
90
Commissioner’s Rules
The LEP postponement rule is
found in the commissioner’s rules in
the Texas Administrative Code
(TAC), Section 101.1005.
(see TAC link in Appendix A, page 90)
91
Exemption vs.
Postponement
• LEP exemptions apply to grades 3–10
TAKS.
• The LEP postponement applies to exit
level TAKS.
92
Exit Level LEP
Postponement
May be granted for the initial exit level
administration of a LEP student who
first enrolled in U.S. schools no more
than 12 months prior to the
administration of the exit level tests
from which the postponement is sought.
93
LEP Postponement
Documentation
•
•
•
•
LEP status
Program participation
Length of time in U.S. schools
Evidence of inadequate foundation of
learning outside U.S.
• Instructional interventions
• Evidence of insufficient progress by spring
(see pages 41 & 42 and sample form on page 43)
94
Student Examples
Pages 44-47
95
6 Student
Examples to Review
• Alejandra Ruiz
Category 1, Year 1
• René Robles
Category 2, Year 1
• María Dávila
Category 1, Year 2
• Wang Lung
Category 2, Year 2
• Sergio Torres
Category 1, Year 3
• Anna Hrgovcic
Category 2, Year 3
See pages
44-47
96
Documentation
Requirements for
Exempted Students
Pages 48-64
97
Required Documentation
Required documentation includes—
– records indicating all 5 general exemption
criteria met
– evidence of insufficient schooling outside
U.S.
– description of instructional interventions
– evidence of insufficient progress by spring
of year
– reason for exemption
See page 49
98
Records, Signatures, and
Forms
• Needed for exempted students
• School records or parental
verification needed for some criteria
• LPAC and teacher signatures needed
for other criteria
• Sample forms provided
99
TAKS Immigrant Status
• The TAKS definition of
immigrant differs from the PEIMS
definition.
• TAKS definition: A student who has
resided outside the 50 U.S. states for at
least 2 consecutive years at some point in his
or her history.
100
Years in U.S. Schools
For TAKS exemptions and TELPAS
data collection, enrollment in a U.S.
school for all or part of a school
year counts as 1 year.
101
Extensive Absences of
Schooling Outside U.S.
Extensive absences of schooling
outside U.S. must be documented
for exempted students in category 1
who are in second or third school
year in U.S.
102
Insufficient Schooling
Outside U.S.
For all exempted students,
evidence of an inadequate foundation of
learning outside U.S. must come from—
• assessments from
state-approved list
OR
• informal assessments
103
Instructional Interventions
LPACs are required to
describe the instructional
interventions that are being
implemented to target the individual
educational needs of immigrant
students for whom an exemption is
necessary.
104
Definition
Instructional intervention =
assistance that is designed to
accelerate the progress of a
struggling learner and that requires
carefully targeted, individualized
instruction in class and, in many
instances, beyond the classroom.
105
Instructional
Interventions Form
See page 54 of the manual for a
sample form for documenting
instructional interventions for
students in grades 3–10.
106
Insufficient Progress
by Spring
Evidence may come from—
• ongoing informal assessments
(inventories and checklists)
OR
• teacher reviews of class
performance
107
Reasons for Exemption
The reasons—
• are provided in the manual
• are to be referenced in
documentation
See list on page 59
108
Using Test Results to
Monitor Progress
Pages 65-73
109
Using Test Results to
Monitor Progress
Schools should use TELPAS
results in conjunction with TAKS
results for instructional
planning.
110
Understanding TELPAS
Reading for Grades 2–12
• Page 66 of the manual explains how the
TELPAS reading tests differ from
standardized reading achievement tests
such as TAKS.
• Schools that understand the differences
will be able to use results more effectively
to impact teaching and learning.
111
Purposes of TELPAS
• To assess progress of LEP-exempted students
• To indicate when LEP exemptions are
no longer necessary
• To monitor English language reading proficiency
of Spanish TAKS examinees
• To monitor English language reading proficiency
of students who are no longer eligible for a LEP
exemption and are struggling in English
acquisition
112
Instructional Planning
Under Title III of NCLB, schools are
required to use English language
proficiency assessment results in
developing individualized instructional
acceleration plans for LEP students not
making adequate progress in English
language development.
113
Understanding the TELPAS
Proficiency Levels
To understand TELPAS results, we
must understand what the TELPAS
proficiency levels mean.
Page 69
114
TELPAS Proficiency Levels in a
Nutshell
• Beginning: Little or no ability to function in English in
social and academic settings
• Intermediate: Limited ability to function in English in
social and academic settings; can understand and use
simple language structures and high-frequency English in
routine contexts
• Advanced: Can handle grade-appropriate English,
although ongoing linguistic support is needed
• Advanced high: Can handle grade-appropriate English
with minimal linguistic support; limited English does not
stand in the way of academic achievement
115
What TELPAS Results Tell Us
•
TELPAS ratings of beginning and intermediate
indicate a significantly limited ability to use
English as a medium for learning academic
material.
•
ELLs in U.S. schools 3 years or more who are still
at these levels need carefully planned, highly
intensive instructional interventions to accelerate
English acquisition.
116
What TELPAS Results Tell Us
• ELLs in U.S. schools 3 years or more who
are at the beginning or intermediate
level are NOT likely to understand the
English used on standardized
achievement tests. Their results on such
tests must be interpreted with caution.
117
About ELLs in Texas,
Spring 2008
• In spring 2008, approximately 677,000
ELLs were assessed in all domains with
TELPAS.
• In grades 3–12, over 20,000 1st year
immigrants were reported.
• In grades 3–12, about 40% of 1st year
immigrants received a TELPAS
composite rating of beginning.
118
About ELLs in Texas,
Spring 2008
• In grades 3–12, over 161,000 ELLs were
reported as enrolled for 5 or more
years.
• About 71,000 ELLs in grades 3-12 who
had been enrolled for 3, 4, or 5 or more
years were still at the beginning or
intermediate levels of English language
proficiency (composite ratings).
119
TELPAS and AMAOs

TELPAS is used in the AMAO accountability
system for ELLs. Under NCLB, states must show
annual increases in the progress ELLs make in
learning English and in attaining English language
proficiency.

Our progress goal is to evaluate the percent of
ELLs making at least one proficiency level of
progress a year.

Our attainment goal is to evaluate the percent of
ELLs reaching the advanced high proficiency level.
AMAOs are Annual Measurable
Achievement Objectives.
120
TELPAS Results in the
LPAC Manual
Statewide results in the manual include:
• attainment in spring 2008, Gr. 3-12
• attainment in spring 2008, Gr. K-2
• The results are in terms of composite
proficiency ratings (not individual domain
ratings).
Pages 72 & 73
121
Language Domain Weights
in TELPAS Composite Ratings
This chart shows the weight of each language domain in
the overall composite ratings.
Listening
Speaking
Reading
Writing
5%
5%
75%
15%
These domain weights have been used since
2005-2006 but may change in the future.
Page 106
122
AMAO Performance Targets
AMAO
Indicator
Target
20052006
Target Target
2006- 20072007
2008
Target
20082009
AMAO 1: K–2 Progress
15%
17%
-
TBD
AMAO 1: 3–12 Progress
42%
44%
-
TBD
2%
2.5%
2.5%
TBD
AMAO 2: 3–12 Attainment, M1
25.5%
26%
25%
TBD
AMAO 2: 3–12 Attainment, M2
42%
44%
40%
TBD
AMAO 3: LEP AYP Math
42%
50%
50%
58%
AMAO 3: LEP AYP Reading/ELA
53%
60%
60%
67%
AMAO 2: K–2 Attainment
AMAO 1 and 2 targets (standards) for 2008-2009 TBD as of December 2008.
123
% of ELLs at Each TELPAS Proficiency
Level, Spring 2008
(Composite Ratings)
Grade
Group
No. of
Students
K–2
303,012
3–12 373,622
%
B
39
%
I
26
%
A
20
%
H
16
8
17
30
45
B = Beginning
I = Intermediate
A = Advanced
H = Advanced High
124
K-2 ELLs by Grade: Percent at Each TELPAS
Proficiency Level in Spring 2008
(Composite Ratings)
Grade
Number of
Students
K–2 Combined
Kindergarten
Grade 1
Grade 2
303,012
100,518
105,049
97,445
TELPAS Composite
Proficiency Ratings
%
B
%
I
%
A
%
H
39
64
37
14
26
19
29
30
20
11
20
30
16
6
14
27
125
3-12 ELLs: Percent at Each TELPAS Proficiency Level
in Spring 2008 by Years in U.S. Schools
(Composite Ratings)
School Years of
Enrollment in U.S.
Number
of
Students
Years Combined
Sec. Sem. Immigrant
First Sem. Immigrant
Two Years
Three Years
Four Years
Five or More Years
No Info Provided
373,622
3,971
16,732
22,781
91,556
75,108
161,231
2,243
TELPAS Composite
Proficiency Ratings
%
B
%
I
%
A
%
H
8
54
37
19
8
6
4
10
17
20
26
27
19
17
14
19
30
14
19
26
30
30
31
28
45
12
19
29
43
47
51
43
126
LEP Students Served by
Special Education
Pages 74-78
127
Provisions for LEP Students
Served by Special Education
LPAC and ARD committees must work
in conjunction when making and
documenting assessment and
accommodation decisions.
128
Provisions for LEP Students
Served by Special Education
• The provisions in this section of the
manual should be used in conjunction with
the ARD committee manual that was issued
by TEA earlier in the school year. Title of
manual: ARD Committee Decision-Making
Process for the Texas Assessment
Program (Grades 3–11): Reference Manual
Updated for the 2008–2009 Testing Year.
129
Provisions for LEP Students
Served by Special Education
Academic Achievement
See –
• Information about LEP exemptions from
TAKS, TAKS (Accommodated), and
TAKS-M (page 75)
• LAT information (pages 75 & 76)
130
Provisions for LEP Students
Served by Special Education
• The exemption criteria, found on pages 13-32
of the manual, apply to all recent immigrant LEP
students, including those served by special
education.
• However, for LEP students served by special
education, criteria that reference the TEKS or
TAKS should be interpreted in accordance with
the student’s IEP and whether the student would
be taking TAKS, TAKS (Accommodated), or
TAKS–M.
131
Provisions for LEP Students
Served by Special Education
• To meet federal requirements, students
served by special education who qualify for a
LEP exemption should participate in LAT
administrations of TAKS or TAKS–M in the
following grades and subjects
-Grades 3-8 and 10 reading/ELA and
math, and
-Grades 5, 8, and 10 science
Remember, students who need LAT versions of
TAKS Accommodated use the regular LAT test
booklet.
132
Provisions for LEP Students
Served by Special Education
Assessing English Language Proficiency
See –
• participation guidelines for TELPAS
reading, grades 2–12 (page 77)
• participation guidelines for TELPAS
holistically rated assessments (page 78)
133
Exemptions from TELPAS on
the Basis of a Disability
• In rare cases, a LEP student served by special
education may qualify for an ARD exemption (score
code of X) from TELPAS on a domain-by-domain
basis.
• This exemption is now termed “ARD Decision” in test
administration materials.
• The ARD and LPAC committees must collaboratively
make these decisions.
• The LPAC must document the reason for the decision
in the student’s permanent record file, and the ARD
committee must document it in the student’s IEP.
134
Frequently Asked
Questions (FAQs)
Pages 79-88
135
FAQs
The frequently asked questions on
pages 79-87 of the manual
provide a quick way to find
answers.
136
Contact Information
• E-mail address:
[email protected]
• Student Assessment Division phone
number:
512-463-9536
• The LPAC manual and this PowerPoint are
posted in the “ELL Assessment
Information” section of the Student
Assessment Division website.
137
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