W E L CO M E ! !
August 9, 2012
East Asian Languages and Cultures
Indiana University
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Professor Natsuko Tsujimura
(Japanese Linguistics)
Goodbody Hall 247
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Bob Eno
(Chinese intellectual history)
Goodbody Hall 328
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Erin Garcia
Goodbody Hall 230
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Deb Speer
Office Manager & Fiscal Officer
Goodbody Hall 248
Rachel Gray
Receptionist & Administrative Assistant
Goodbody Hall 250 (main office)
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 Alex Burch
 Yanfei Chen
 Tiphani Dixon
 Misato Hiraga
 Daniel Idziak
 Chelsea Liddell
 Xiaosu Xue
 Xiaomeng Zhang
 Huiqi Zhou
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 Indiana University, Bloomington
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 Founded in 1962
 as East Asian Languages & Literatures (EALL)
Our 50th Anniversary!
 Changes to EALC in 1975
 Focal department for all East Asian studies faculty
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“GREATER” EALC
FI
Folk & Ethno
Business
BH
SB
Anthropology
Education
WH
Poli Sci
History
Sociology
Comp Lit
SY
Rel. Studies
Goodbody Hall
EALC
800 E. 3rd
Comm & Cult
CEUS
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Research Center for
Chinese Politics and
Business (Woodburn Hall)
Chinese Flagship
(Eigenmann Hall)
EALC – Goodbody Hall
East Asian Studies
Center (Memorial Hall)
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 Undergraduate: B.A.
 Graduate:
 MA in Chinese / Japanese
 Language Pedagogy Track
 Chinese Flagship Track
 MA in East Asian Studies (EAS - C / J / K focus)
 Joint/Dual MAs (with EAS): MA/MPA; MA/MBA
 Ph.D. in Chinese / Japanese
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 Degree completion within 5 consecutive years
 Excluding joint/dual degrees (within 6 years)
 Total credit hours: 30 (for all MA tracks)
 Exception EAS/MPA: 24
 Language requirement (varies with degree track)
 placement test is required
 placement must be observed
 Final project: thesis / essay / pedagogy project
 Maintain 3.0 Grade Point Average (GPA)
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 Up to 8 credit hours from another institution
 Grade of B or higher
 Requires faculty evaluation and approval
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 8 hours
 6 hours – Associate Instructors (AIs)
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A. 20 hours - “C/J courses”
- C511/J511
- 2 additional courses
at/above 500-level (not
C533/534)
e.g., EALC C506; J506
(Red = courses offered Fall 2012)
B. 10 hours – elective
courses; e.g., EALC E505 (8
topic options Fall ‘12); REL
R554: FOLK F600
- Thesis (C701, J701) or
Essay (E597): 1 - 4 cr.
Note: Taking credits for project
not required (most students
take them)
C. Language
completion of 4th level
- 1st/2nd year do not count
- 3rd/4th: count for a. or b.
(but not as 500-level)
[2nd EA lang. at 3rd yr level or
above may also count for A. or B.]
Why the focus on 500/600-level courses?
Old system: 300/400 level courses could
be for undergraduate or graduate courses.
New system: only 500+ for graduates but
old courses allowed to keep their old
numbers, so a few 300/400 courses do still
count for graduate credit, e.g., POLS Y334.
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A. 20 hours
– Required Courses:
Chinese: C525, C535; C527; C506 or
C507; (C520)
Japanese: J520, J525, J527; J506 or
J507
– Plus 8 more credits from available C
or J courses
B.
C.
Language
completion of 4th level
- 1st/2nd – year do not count
- 3rd/4th year may count for A.
or B. (but not as 500-level)
10 hours – non- C or J electives
e.g. EALC E505 (8 topic options Fall
‘12), EDUC L630, SLS S532
- Master’s Pedagogy Project (C598,
J598) 1-4cr.
Note: Taking credits for project not
required (most students take them)
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A. 20 hours of Chinese (Cprefixed courses)
– During yr. 1: 18-24 credits,
inc. C557 and/or C567
– During yr. 2: 4-month
internship in China (EALC
C599) and one semester
courses at Nanjing University
C. Language
Completion of fifth-year
level
- 1st /2nd yr do not count
- 3rd /4th yr do count
B. Master’s Project: Enroll in
EALC C597 during
internship
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A. 20 hours - “culture &
area courses”
- 3 courses above 500-level
MANY OPTIONS
C. Language
Completion 3rd yr. level
- 1st/2nd year do not count
- 3rd/4th year count for b.
B. 10 hours – elective
MANY OPTIONS
- Thesis (E700) or Essay (E597):
1-4cr.
Note: Taking credits for project
not required (most students
take them)
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A. 24 hours
-Including:
3 social science courses
2 history
1 humanities
-Ordinarily, at least 18 of
these 24 credits would
be drawn from the list of
“Culture & Area
Courses”
-3 courses must be at 500level or above
-Thesis (E700) or essay
(E597): 1-3cr.
B. Language
Completion of 3rd yr level
- 1st /2nd yr: do not count
- 3rd /4th yr: count (but not as
500-level)
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A. 30 hours
- Including:
3 social science courses
2 history
1 humanities
- Ordinarily, at least 18 credits
would be drawn from the
list of “Culture & Area
Courses”
- 3 courses must be at 500level or above
- up to 6 hrs. may be Business
courses (with approval)
- Thesis (E700) or essay
(E597): 1-4cr.
B. Language
Completion of 3rd yr level
- 1st /2nd yr: do not count
- 3rd /4th yr: count (but not as
500-level)
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 University Graduate School Academic Bulletin
 “General Requirements for Advanced Degrees”
 Policies & Procedures/Degree Requirements tabs
 “East Asian Languages and Cultures Department”
Section
 EALC Handbook for MA Students (hardcopy & online)
Any divergence requires faculty advisor and DGS
permission.
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 Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and
Conduct
 Plagiarism & academic dishonesty
 Definition
 Consequences
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 Master’s research project
 Major aspect of MA degree requirements
 Be thinking from the day you begin class about
potential research topics
 Project normally conceived by the end of your
first year; committee in place by beginning of
second year
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Three possible project types depending on program
and track:
 Thesis
 Original, scholarly work, demonstrating research
skills for advanced (Ph.D.) work
 Essay
 Critical evaluation of scholarly literature in the
field
 Pedagogy project
 Critical evaluation of empirical/methodological
work
 Development of teaching tools
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 Committee of 3 Readers:
 Your faculty advisor and two additional readers
 Likely topic (or topics) should be identified by the end of
the 1st year
 Procedure for Approval of Project must be completed
Project approval form (includes committee list, committee
signatures, a project description)
One-page proposal draft before you approach second &
third committee members
..
Helpful Hints
 Language Testing
 Almost everyone tests lower than they think they will!
 Our tests are geared toward our specific curriculum and designed to
pinpoint where you fit in here at IUB! Don’t despair!
 Study Space
 Find your niche! There are quiet spaces all over campus in all of our
many libraries to take advantage of that can offer a quiet
environment to study in.
 Cars, Bikes, Busses, and Parking
 Cars are not ideal for students on campus! Parking is hard to find
and tickets and towing charges add up fast!
 Bus rides are free to students this includes campus and city routes.
Your Student ID card is your Bus Pass.
 If you still want to bring a car you will need to see parking
operations
for a permit.
 Bikes are popular, fast, and healthy and Bloomington is a Bike
Friendly City. However, you still want to observe traffic laws and be 27
careful when riding.
 Register for Classes
 After you have met with the DGS and turned in your
progress sheet to me (Erin ) you should register
ASAP so you can get your Student ID Card.
 ID Cards
 ID Cards can be obtained in the IMU or Eigenmann
Hall (10th and Union) if you need a campus map let
me know.
 You can use your ID card as a bus pass, library card,
and add money for use to purchase food at the food
courts etc. and around town at locations that accept
Campus Access Cards
 You MUST be registered before you can obtain your
ID Card!
 Books
 You can purchase your books at the IU Bookstore
located in the IMU or at TIS. You will probably
need to visit both locations to acquire them all.
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 Bloomington and Beyond
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IU Art Museum
Mathers Museum
Bryan Park
Lake Monroe
Oliver Winery
Lotus Festival, 4th Street
Festival
Jacobs School Of Music Events,
Operas, Ballets
Ruth N Halls Theatre
Downtown-Art, Food,
Handmade shops
IU Auditorium
Events/Shows/Concerts
IU Football, Soccer, Basketball
Events Calendar Link
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 Indianapolis
 Eiteljorg Museum, Zoo,
Colts, IMA, Indians,
Pacers, Children’s
Museum, Motor
Speedway/Museum,
Concerts
 Brown County
 Artist Galleries,
200 Unique Shops,
Restaurants, Foliage,
TC Steele Site
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Advising driven by:
 Your Individual Faculty Advisor
 Director of Graduate Studies
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Two main components of Advising Procedures
(after your initial session at the beginning of this term, with DGS)
1. Fall and Spring advising sessions with individual faculty advisor
- These must be completed, with forms filled out, before your
“registration hold” is removed
- You must make the appointments with faculty advisor
2. Annual Review of all Grad Students
1. Faculty advisors write assessment of progress
2. Student self-evaluation of progress
3. Review of reports by DGS and Graduate Staff (Erin Garcia)
4. Follow up by DGS, staff, and advisor with student, identification of
potential problems; notification of warnings and probations, etc.
MOST STUDENTS DO STAY ON TRACK
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 Graduate School is professional training
 Take responsibility for your progress
 Ask for help when you need it
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 Graduate program grade expectations:
Minimum GPA 3.0 (B) far below actual expectations
Graduate grading scale is very high
A : Very good work
A- : Good
B+ : Satisfactory, with some concern
B : Cause for concern
B- : Major problems
 For the Graduate School at IU
At least a “C” for credit
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1. Keep in touch with
your advisor and
initiate your
Fall/Spring advising
sessions
1. Hope that everything
will work out and that
your advisor will sign
your form at the last
minute
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2. Think about your
progress and
provide a good
and timely
assessment on
your annual
review
2. Just focus on
day-to-day
assignments and
assume that the
annual
assessment isn’t
really important
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3. Start thinking
about your Master’s
project early, and
begin speaking to
possible committee
members about
topics by the end
Spring term.
3. Decide that your
Master’s project
idea will come to
you without effort,
and put it off as you
wait for inspiration.
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4.
If you encounter
4. Avoid letting
problems, talk to
anyone know if
your teachers,
you’re having
advisors, or the
problems. Ignore
DGS to get
them or postpone
support. Check in
dealing with
regularly with Erin
them.
Garcia.
Be invisible
Be visible.
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 EALC Graduate Student Association
 Representative function
 Organizational meeting early in the term
 Interaction with other students
 Often your best resource
 Attend departmental events!
 Parties once a term (with EASC)
 Special lectures (job searches)
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 Fridays, 12:00-1:15, about every two weeks
Usually in Ballantine Hall 104
 Local faculty & PhD students
 Invited specialists from other schools & countries
 China / Japan / Korea
 All periods and disciplines
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 GPSO
 Graduate & Professional Student Association
 Role in campus governance
 Representation for graduate students
 Services for graduate students
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Thursday, August 16th—Get Oriented @ IU Information Fair
2–4pm Herman B Wells Library, main lobby
Learn about campus and community organizations, enjoy
refreshments and library tours, and meet and network with incoming
students
Friday, August 17th—Q & A on Student Insurance Plans
2-4pm Herman B Wells Library
Sessions begin at 2pm and 3pm in room E-174 (Media Room)
Friday, August 17th—Graduate Student Social Hour at FARM
free appetizers
7-9pm Farm Restaurant (108 E. Kirkwood)
in the Root Cellar
Sunday, August 19th—New Graduate and Professional Student FREE Lunch
2-4 pm Bryan Park (Woodlawn Picnic Shelter)
Free, family-friendly event for IUB graduate students.
Food provided by the GPSO!
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 Sign up for tomorrow’s advising session with DGS
 Your hosts for lunch: continuing EALC students
 Jingjing Cai
 Jude Coulter-Pultz
 Anthony Ross
 Lunch at the Chow Bar Restaurant
 Language placement tests
 (meet in Goodbody 201 at 2:00)
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 Learn how to apply critical thinking in specialized
contexts
 Become accustomed to hard thought and work on
your own initiative
 Determine your career path and master the
specific tools you’ll need
 Learn to communicate on all levels with others
pursuing academic/professional careers
Have fun!
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EALC Graduate Orientation