Title your paper “Famous
Cases”.
Fold your paper from the right
edge to the red line.
We will be answering five
questions about Brewer v
Hamilton Middle School and
five questions about a real
Supreme Court case that
affects your lives.
Paper Preparation
Famous Cases
Ben’s Case
What right
are we
talking
about?
How is it
limited?
Precedent?
Factors?
What
happened in
the
precedent
case?
Savana’s Case
1. What right are we talking
about?
What right did Ben claim was
being violated?
SUPREME DECISION REVIEW
2. How is the right limited?
SUPREME DECISION REVIEW
3. Which case was used as
precedent?
When deciding this case, the
justices looked at a previous
case to see how they handled
the situation in the past.
SUPREME DECISION REVIEW
4. What factor(s) is/are used
from the precedent case?
In Tinker, the court
determined that speech could
be banned under certain
circumstances.
What are the circumstances?
SUPREME DECISION REVIEW
5. What happened in the
precedent case?
Summarize the precedent
case in one sentence.
At the very least, include:
WHO
WHAT
and WHY
SUPREME DECISION REVIEW
Savana’s Case
Savana Redding’s school principal heard Savana had
been giving pills to other students. He talked to
Savana, and then ordered the school nurse and a
female school employee to search Savana. They told
Savana to take off her outer clothing and shake out
her underwear. They didn’t find any pills.
How the Supreme Court Decided
The Fourth Amendment protects people from
“unreasonable searches.” Nobody argued that what
happened to Savana was not a search. But the
Constitution puts a limit on the right to not be
searched: it only protects people from unreasonable
searches.
How the Supreme Court Decided
How does the Court know when a search is
unreasonable? It looks for a similar case that was
already decided, called a precedent case. A
precedent case usually gives factors that must be
considered in future cases.
How the Supreme Court Decided
To decide Savana’s case, the Court looked at a case
called New Jersey v.T.L.O., where a school was
allowed to search a high school student’s purse after
she was caught smoking. In the T.L.O. case, the
Supreme court had said that whether a search in
school is unreasonable depends on two factors:
How the Supreme Court Decided
1) whether the school had good reason to believe the
search needed to be done
2) whether the search went too far
Using these two factors, the Court decided that the
school did have a good reason to believe they
should search Savana, but that a strip search went
too far.
1. What right are we talking
about?
What right did Savana claim
was being violated?
SAVANA’S CASE REVIEW
2. How is the right limited?
SAVANA’S CASE REVIEW
3. Which case was used as
precedent?
When deciding this case, the
justices looked at a previous
case to see how they handled
the situation in the past.
SAVANA’S CASE REVIEW
4. What factor(s) is/are used
from the precedent case?
In New Jersey v. T.L.O., the
court determined that
searches could be carried out
if two factors were taken into
consideration.
What are the factors?
SAVANA’S CASE REVIEW
5. What happened in the
precedent case?
Summarize the precedent
case in one sentence.
At the very least, include:
WHO
WHAT
and WHY
SAVANA’S CASE REVIEW
Turn to the back of your paper.
We are going to discuss seven
famous cases from the
Supreme Court and summarize
why they are important to
your life.
The case names will be on the
upcoming slides, so don’t panic
and yell “wait!” like you always
do.
Paper Preparation
Marbury v. Madison
Plessy v. Ferguson
Meyer v. Nebraska
Brown v. Board of
Education
Gideon v. Wainwright
Tinker v. Des Moines
School District
New Jersey v. T.L.O.
Marbury v.
Madison
Plessy v.
Ferguson
Meyer v.
Nebraska
Brown v. Board
of Education
Gideon v.
Wainwright
Marbury v. Madison (1803)
This case said the Supreme Court and
other courts have the power to decide
whether something is unconstitutional.
Because of this case, courts can strike down
government actions that violate the
Constitution.
Tinker v. Des
Moines School
District
New Jersey v.
T.L.O.
How does this case protect your rights?
Marbury v.
Madison
Plessy v.
Ferguson
Meyer v.
Nebraska
Brown v. Board
of Education
Gideon v.
Wainwright
Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)
This case said it was constitutional for
places like schools, buses and restaurants to
keep people of different races apart, as long
as the services offered were “equal.”
For example, it was okay to make black and
white people ride on separate train cars.
Tinker v. Des
Moines School
District
New Jersey v.
T.L.O.
If this were still law,
what could the government require you to do?
Marbury v.
Madison
Plessy v.
Ferguson
Meyer v.
Nebraska
Meyer v. Nebraska (1923)
This case said it’s unconstitutional for a
state to ban the teaching of foreign
languages.
Brown v. Board
of Education
Gideon v.
Wainwright
Tinker v. Des
Moines School
District
New Jersey v.
T.L.O.
How does this case change your options in school?
Marbury v.
Madison
Plessy v.
Ferguson
Meyer v.
Nebraska
Brown v. Board
of Education
Gideon v.
Wainwright
Brown v. Board of Education (1954)
This case overruled Plessy v. Ferguson by
saying it’s unconstitutional for the
government to require students of different
races to go to different schools.
The Court said separate schools for
students of different races are not equal.
Tinker v. Des
Moines School
District
New Jersey v.
T.L.O.
How does this case affect your quality of education?
Marbury v.
Madison
Plessy v.
Ferguson
Meyer v.
Nebraska
Brown v. Board
of Education
Gideon v.
Wainwright
Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)
This case said that people accused of a
crime must be given a lawyer even if they
cannot afford one.
It’s unconstitutional to deny them a lawyer
just because they’re poor.
Tinker v. Des
Moines School
District
New Jersey v.
T.L.O.
How does this case protect your rights?
Marbury v.
Madison
Plessy v.
Ferguson
Meyer v.
Nebraska
Brown v. Board
of Education
Tinker v. Des Moines (1969)
This case said it’s unconstitutional to deny
students the right to free speech at school,
unless the students’ speech disrupts school
activities.
Gideon v.
Wainwright
Tinker v. Des
Moines School
District
New Jersey v.
T.L.O.
How does this case affect you at school?
Marbury v.
Madison
Plessy v.
Ferguson
Meyer v.
Nebraska
Brown v. Board
of Education
Gideon v.
Wainwright
New Jersey v. T.L.O. (1985)
This case said it’s unconstitutional for
principals and teachers to search students
and their belongings, unless:
1) there is a good reason
(like safety and discipline) and
2) the search doesn’t go too far.
Tinker v. Des
Moines School
District
New Jersey v.
T.L.O.
How does this affect your rights in school?
Descargar

Supreme decision review